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PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2007 7:03 pm 
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Many on here are proponents of low-carb diets, so I figured I could ask a question about it here.

If one's body is in Ketosis or otherwise accustomed to low carbohydrate intake, how does the body respond to a rapid, large intake of high-GI food? Alcohol? Is there any significant increase in the risk of diabetes or other diet-related problems, is what I'm looking for, should this occur.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2007 7:18 pm 
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I can't speak for the alcohol side of this, but I'm guessing it couldn't be good. On the other hand, there are many plans out there based up low carbing for s few days, then "carbing up". The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet comes to mind, in various forms. Mainly for bodybuilders, to keep the mscles from getting flat, the hi carb once a week or so gets the glycogen in and that plus the water retention of carbs fill up the muscles and pumps tham. Dr. DiPasquale (an former IPF champ at 145 aned 165) recommends this type of thing for strength athletes trying to keep their weight down.
Tim


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2007 9:43 pm 
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It will respond to high GI better because your insulin receptors will be more sensitive. Alcohol has very little effect on sugar/insulin. However most drinks are quite sugary. I tend to drink Scotch, Canadian whiskey, fine wines, and low carb beer like Michelob Ultra and Ultra Amber and Miller Lite. I chase average whiskeys with diet soda. Nicer ones I have on the rocks. Never had a problem with it. The better beers, are quite fattening. Once a bulking phase or so I have have a nice ale, porter, or stout. They are not as bad as the mixed drinks, but still fattening.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 12:17 am 
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Another quick question...

About the fats, does it matter what type they are? Obviously trans fat is bad and places everything seems to be rid of it now, and certain types (monounsaturated, i think) are better than saturated. But is there any ratio that I should be going for, here, with regards to saturated and monounsaturated / polyunsaturated.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 3:42 am 
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You want to get as much of the omega 3 as possible to offset the omega 6. So take fish oil. I wouldn't give saturated fat a second thought. It just fills out your calories. So if you aren't eating much in the way of carbs, you will probably be eating a lot of saturated fat. Trans-fat is the only thing you have to cut out.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 6:28 am 
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I pretty much agree w/ Ironman, to a point. However, even the Atkins camp came out with a statement of while you don't have to be overly concerned with saturated fats, try to get the bulk of your fat from lean meats (rather than sausage), nuts, avacados, olives, olive oil and cold water (fatty) fish.
Tim


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 Post subject: fats
PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 7:44 am 
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Hi!
yes you are right about trans fats and most people know about the omegas 3 6 9 and the other saturates but...

...i just want to say a quick word about cholesterol here; in my nutrition advisor training i was told that there are "good" and "bad" cholesterols to be found in fatty foods including red meat. these good cholesterols help the body synthesise the steroid and sex hormones as well as helping fat soluble vitamins A,D,E,K to be absorbed by the body which is a good thing for everyone in moderation and with obvious advantages for the body builder.
I have a brief nutrition guide on this forum.
nicole :0)

Dave X wrote:
Another quick question...

About the fats, does it matter what type they are? Obviously trans fat is bad and places everything seems to be rid of it now, and certain types (monounsaturated, i think) are better than saturated. But is there any ratio that I should be going for, here, with regards to saturated and monounsaturated / polyunsaturated.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 12:36 pm 
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Ok, I will admit I don't know what happens when you eat nothing but bacon and sausage. People would get bored with that wouldn't they? So my post assumes people don't have such strange eating habits.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2007 1:44 pm 
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Not to disagree with anything anyone said, following is how I've sorted it out.

You want to get about 1/3 from each of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated and no transfats.

Saturated fats are easily obtained from fats and most people get too much. There are about 20 different types of saturated fats, some of which are quite healthy, some not so good. Meat is a good balance source of all of them.

Monounsaturated fats are usually underrepresented in most diets so it's wise to add olive oil and nuts to most diets.

Polyunsaturated fats are the only essential fats. Made up mostly of Omega 6 and Omega 3. These should be in a balanced ratio. Ideal is 1:1 although 4:1 Omega 6 to Omega 3 is still considered healthy. Most people get about 20:1 or worse. To much Omega 6 competes with Omega 3 for the enzymes they need making an imbalance even worse. Supplementing Omega 3 (Fish oil, Flax, Walnuts) can improve many chronic conditions and aid in fat loss.


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