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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 8:17 am 
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I have a request for some thoughts from people.

The palaeolithic diet is one which basically consists of eating No grains, no starches, no dairy produce, no refined sugars. Basically nothing which has to be processed and isn't intended for human consumption.

What it seems to really boil down to in my opinion is eating the slow digesting foods, lots of meat and fibrous veg.

But how does this work with Exercise?

When we exercise we should recover with easily digestible proteins and carbs (generally lots of). But this goes against the whole palaeolithic diet.

So my question is basically what are people's thoughts on this. My diet tends to be very palaeolithic, not through intention but by accident. Also, I am not sure that cutting out anything entirely is strictly good. Lets be fair, when you feel like crap sitting down with a pizza, 6pack of beer and 1/2 a tub of Ben and Gerries makes me feel much better than a slice of steam and a raw broccoli.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 8:35 am 
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In Memoriam: TimD
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Apparenty it seems to work pretty well, a lot of the crossfit community are strict paleo types and swear by it. While I'm not strict paleo, I;m close; like you I don't believe in cutting things out entirely. I think grains, legumes and some dairy (if you can tolerate it) have a place, albeit a limited place. As to recovery, I never went in for the mega hicarb, hi GI postworkout meals.I just made sure that post workout I got a regular meal in within a decent period of time and have never had any recovery problems. I do know this from personal experience, the closer I am to Berardi's 7 habits/the Zone/or Paleo, the better off I am in terms of inflamation and joint pain. I've got some nasty arthritus, and seem to be able to make it liveable eating this way.
Tim


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 9:33 am 
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Lately I've been eating a couple of oranges or bananas after workout and protein shortly after, often canned fish. Cavemen used can openers didn't they?

I think Paleo is the way to go but I'm not that hard core about. I like oatmeal for breakfast and sometimes it's just more convenient to have my meal in the form of a sandwich. That's probably why I'm still a little soft around the middle.

Stu


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 10:06 am 
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I'm actually a paleo-eater and thanks to this diet I healed almost all the food allergies I had!

there's also an athlete version of the diet with potatoes, you shuould give it a try!


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 3:15 am 
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There is a lot of information about Paleo on the Performance Menu site, too. PM always has food recipes each issue, and they try to cover low-carb, paleo, and Zone (and combinations thereof) in it.

I'm like TimD, I don't want to cut anything out entirely. I'm wary of some of the pronouncements about how "primitive man" ate and didn't eat, but that's not really important. No matter how people ate before, the diet seems to work for the Paleo weight-training folks here and now, and that's what is important. I can't go full-bore into it, but I try to err on the side of Paleo when I can. I figure it's pretty close to Jack Lalanne's "If man made it, don't eat it!" pronouncement, and he's in better shape in his nineties than I am in my 30s...


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 5:29 am 
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Think about life expectancies then and now. Well, I don't really know what the cavemen's life expectancies were, but at least compare a couple of hundred years ago with today. Have we improved our longevities despite our diet, or because of it?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 2:59 pm 
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Jungledoc wrote:
Think about life expectancies then and now. Well, I don't really know what the cavemen's life expectancies were, but at least compare a couple of hundred years ago with today. Have we improved our longevities despite our diet, or because of it?


I think the reason we live longer is because of better medicine and doctors. No longer are we relying on blood letting.....although there are still a few instances where leeches are medicinally used. These days, we have antibiotics, inoculations, anti-venoms, incredible diagnostic machinery, etc.

I think it’s the science and medicine that has increased our lifespan even though our diets have gotten a lot worse. Just look at how much of science is dedicated to fixing the problems caused by our diets such as obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, etc.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 4:22 pm 
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Chris_A wrote:
Quote:
I think the reason we live longer is because of better medicine and doctors. No longer are we relying on blood letting.....although there are still a few instances where leeches are medicinally used. These days, we have antibiotics, inoculations, anti-venoms, incredible diagnostic machinery, etc.

This can only account for part of the increase. Historically lifespans started increasing prior to these innovations.
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I think it’s the science and medicine that has increased our lifespan even though our diets have gotten a lot worse. Just look at how much of science is dedicated to fixing the problems caused by our diets such as obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, etc.

So true.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 5:13 pm 
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Jungledoc wrote:
This can only account for part of the increase. Historically lifespans started increasing prior to these innovations.


If you look back in history, people lived as long as we do now. It was the “average” lifespan that increased which means more people are living longer. But, it doesn’t necessarily mean life itself is longer. In the old days, the big 3 for taking you out were accident, sanitation, and disease. And sanitation is far more than just a good sewer system or trash disposal, it also covers medical practices such as doctors washing their hands before working with patients! Ever heard of the amazing and controversial discovery by the physician Ignaz Semmelweis?


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