ExRx.net

Exercise Prescription on the Net
It is currently Thu Nov 20, 2014 9:20 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Canned fish
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 5:00 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:21 pm
Posts: 928
Location: Ohio, USA
The to or to not supplement topic got me thinking...I am trying to do all I can to avoid supplements (I am just stubborn I know), and have thought of a way to at least add something I think my normal diet is lacking. I have decided to add 3 cans of fish (tuna or salmon probably just cause they are cheaper) per day to my diet because I've read they are a pretty good natural source of creatine, fish oils (duh), and protein (duh as well). I am only a little concerned due to the fact that I have heard high amounts of fish is not good due to mercury content. Is this justified? Should I try not to eat this much?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 5:08 pm 
Offline
moderator
moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:44 pm
Posts: 6426
Location: Halifax, NS
If you do, mix it up. White tuna has the highest mercury. Salmon, herring, tuna, mackerel, etc all have different nutrients and contaminants. You can mitigate any risk by getting a little of each rather than all the same. There's may be no harm in 1-2 cans a day and 3 may be ok if you're not pregnant.

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tnam ... e&dbid=103


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 5:27 pm 
Offline
Associate Member
Associate Member

Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 2:21 pm
Posts: 397
Location: Florida panhandle
stuward wrote:
White tuna has the highest mercury.


Interesting....I just bought some albacore tuna from Sams the other day. I was growing tired of the same ole regular tuna. The tuna was even getting a tad smelly and whiter than usual....weird. I figure it was time for a change.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 5:40 pm 
Offline
moderator
moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:44 pm
Posts: 6426
Location: Halifax, NS
It's not as bad as shark and swordfish but among canned fish it's probably the largest and oldest living fish, hence, higher mercury.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 6:57 pm 
Offline
Associate Member
Associate Member

Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2009 12:55 am
Posts: 468
Location: Seattle
Canned tuna has mercury in significant enough quantities that you might want to avoid eating it every day.

The Monterey Bay Aquarium keeps tabs on this stuff and produces useful "pocket guides" that show which seafood is okay, bad, worse, etc.

http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/download.aspx


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2010 4:42 am 
Offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 11:40 am
Posts: 3987
jml wrote:
Canned tuna has mercury in significant enough quantities that you might want to avoid eating it every day.

The Monterey Bay Aquarium keeps tabs on this stuff and produces useful "pocket guides" that show which seafood is okay, bad, worse, etc.

http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/download.aspx


The problem with that is they got different results in all their samples. So it's not very conclusive. I still wouldn't eat it every day though.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2010 3:55 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:21 pm
Posts: 928
Location: Ohio, USA
Is the mercury contained in seafood a result of pollution or human effects, or does it naturally just occur in the sea?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2010 4:55 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Thu May 07, 2009 4:31 pm
Posts: 613
The heat and pressure involved in the canning process basically destroys the omega 3 content (can't think of a better word!) which is why fresh fish is one of the best sources.

Edit: I knew this was the case for tuna, but here's some info for other fish.

Quote:
Salmon, sardines, mackerel, trout and pilchards all count as oily fish when they're canned and when they're fresh. This is because the canning process doesn't significantly reduce the fat content of the fish.

Fresh tuna is an oily fish, high in fatty acids. But when it's canned, these fatty acids are reduced to levels similar to white fish. This is because tuna is cooked before it’s canned and most of the oil is lost during this process. So, although canned tuna is a healthy choice for most people, it doesn't count as oily fish.


http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/asksam/health ... q/#A221141


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 


All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group