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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 12:37 pm 
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I know of a couple different "tempos" for lifting (ie 4 pt, 3 pt, etc) but what are the actual physiological reasons for using different tempos? How and why do particular tempos match certain goals (ie: strenth, hypertrophy, calorie expenditure, etc)?

If someone could point me toward some research articles about it that would be great because my info needs to be pretty detailed and citeable.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 1:19 pm 
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If you lift faster, your muscles will (of course) contract faster and thus they need more fast twitch (type IIb) fibres then when you lift slow. If you lift as fast as you can, you will develop/convert more fast twitch fibres then slow twitch(type I). This stands perpendicular upon most bodybuilders' vision (lift slow, gain big muscles). Because fast twitch fibres have a bigger growth potential then slow twitchfibres.
I don't have any research articles, but you can go to www.t-nation.com and go to Chad Waterbury, he really is into this subject and advises his trainees to develop explosiveness power.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 2:07 pm 
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Try this article. There is a link at the bottom to a study like that addresses your query to some extent.

http://www.davedraper.com/fusionbb/show ... ?tid/9300/

"Therefore, using heavy loads during explosive resistance training may be the most effective strategy to achieve simultaneous improvements in muscle strength, power, and endurance in older adults."

You should also read: http://www.cbass.com/SLOWFAST.HTM


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 3:31 pm 
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Wouter, I'm not sure I agree with you completely. Fast twitch muscle fibers can be recruited heavily if the force output is high enough (>65-70% max) regardless of the speed of movement.

Winett, Ph.D wrote:
The notion is that if you move slowly in training you only activate the slow-twitch fibers and if you move quickly, you will activate the fast-twitch fibers. This is part of the rationale for advising athletes to train with not just fast, but explosive movements. This intuitively obvious rationale is actually incorrect. It is one instance where "common sense" is wrong.


Well this issue is way less cut and dry than I expected. Neither of those articles comes to a definitive conclusion but they were helpful anyways. Anyone else have articles? I'm doing a big project on this.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:37 pm 
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I'm sorry, I just have to yell "LIGHT WEIGHT!"


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 6:03 am 
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That is exactly what I was thinking when I saw the name.

"I got about 800 pounds on there now. Everybody wanna be a bodybuilder but don't nobody wanna lift dis weight. Yeah Buddy! Light weight! Light weight!"


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:29 am 
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"BOOOOOOOOOO!"

Funny story...one time during a lifting competition at my school a girl I'm friends with was maxxing out her bench. My other friend was watching and as she has the bar about 1/4 back up from the chest in a high pitch voice he goes, "Nothin' but a peanut!" She couldn't help laughing and the weight came crashing off both ends.

But uh, anyways I'm talking to my neuromuscular control prof today about the rep cadence/tempo. I'll fill you in if you're interested.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 6:22 pm 
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http://www.precisiontraining.com/

Pete Sisco developed a couple of different training methods that make use of fast tempo, short range reps. Power Factor training is what he calls it.

I haven't actually done it myself but I talked with my physics professor about the idea once. Basically, your just trying to measure how much work your muscles do in a given amount of time. If you exert the same force in a shorter time period, your muscles have to generate more power. Physicists call it impulse.

I don't know if it exactly translates to bodybuilding but it seems to make sense. Made for an interesting conversation with my physics prof at least.

{EDIT}

I actually wrote a short paper about the subject for that class. It only deals with the physics of it, so it might not help with physiology and how it relates to hypertrophy etc, but I can email it if your interested.

P.M. me


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 10:41 pm 
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Just to clarify,
"If you exert the same force in a shorter time period, your muscles have to generate more power. Physicists call it impulse."

this is not exactly right. Strictly speaking, impulse is force times the time, so you could generate more force but in a smaller amount of time and the impulse would stay the same.

The important notion here is power which is work/time. So the relevant quantity to concern yourself with is the power. You can increase it by moving the weight faster (reduces the time), which is usually a byproduct of increasing the force(work is force*distance, and distance is constant for a lift).

The impulse is actually a somewhat confusing quantity that does not get used often except in the theory of colliding bodies. It is actually a measure of the change in momentum. Generally speaking, physicists would talk about the power output in a lift, not the impulse.

Perspectives have certainly shifted in recent years so it is possible your teacher has an older viewpoint but I can certainly say that "impulse" is something brushed over in an introductory course and then seldom discussed again.


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