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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2007 11:19 am 
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My sister wants me to train for a marathon with her. The only thing is I do not want to give up what I have gotten in weight training so far, seeing as how I have pretty much only focused on weight training for about half a year. Here is the problem: last year, everytime I did both and really tried to get far with running (like say, over an hour), I think my body would either just crash or my immune system was lowered or something, cause I would sick really easily. And, just the other day, I did 33 minutes at a pretty good pace (granted, it was rainy and cold outside, so this might have had something to do with getting sick again.) Well I got really sick after this run. Do you think I could correct this by just eating more food or getting more sleep? I really do not want to stop lifting...but I kinda made a promise to my sis I would run with her. I do not seem to really ever get sick when I am just lifting...and very seldomly when I am just running, but whenever I combine both, it just messes me up. Anyone else ever had this problem?


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2007 12:53 pm 
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It appears that you can't burn the candle at both ends. If you want to run with your sister in a marathon, you have to downshift your weight workouts as you ramp up your cardio. Once you complete the marthon, you can go back to weight training as normal.

Excess weight - whether muscular or fatty - is a hinderance in distance running, so be prepared to lose some bodyweight as you advance in your cardio training. But when you resume weight training, muscle memory will restore it back to you faster than an untrained lifter would gain mass

I've never trained for a marathon, but I have engaged in overly vigorous cardio programs while doing serious lifting. And like you, I suffered physically for it.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2007 8:46 pm 
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SJ is right on saying you need to shift gears, however I would not completely give up weights , just switch routines to a more sports supporting oriented workout. Increase your reps to around 15-20, lighten the weights to match and possibly go to a whole body circiuit style or a simple upper lower split. As SJ said, after you are done with the marathon, then go back to the standard weight routine you used before. And since you are going to do one hell of a lot of running this means your caloric expediture will be high. Keep your carbs up for fuel. Navy Seals and other special forces burn up to 10,000 cal per day with high intensity running and obstical courses during their training and long distance runners can do the same, maybe not quite as extreme.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2007 12:38 pm 
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When I trained for my marathon (successfully WhooHoo!), leg work was the only thing I cut out. I also spaced my running and lifting as far apart during the day as I could. I lifted in the morning and did my runs in the evening. I didn't have any problems. As for your body crashing, I think everyone's does after about an hour of hard cardio. Navy Seals are just super human (no, I think the program is designed to force a Seal to think when his body no longer wants him to). I highly suggest you look into your pre-run and during run nutrition. Look into some sports related nutritional products. You want to add fuel to your body before you run out. If I ran more than 1.25 hours, I would add some sort of energy to what I ate or drank during my run. It has been two years, but I think I would drink 12 oz of gatorade every 30 minutes and choke down a packet of Gu every 45 minutes or hour. The lemon-lime isn't too bad. Try it. I bet you won't hit the wall nearly as soon as you have been. You have to have energy to burn energy.

BTW, good luck with your training and keep us posted. I used the Runner's World intermediate training schedule and finished in less than 5 hours at 245 pounds. I will never, ever run another. If you are intersted, I'll tell you stuff that no one tells you about while you are training. Then again, you may just want to find out for yourself.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2007 1:13 pm 
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hoosegow wrote:
When I trained for my marathon (successfully WhooHoo!), leg work was the only thing I cut out.


I once read that many elite runners weight trained their upper bodies only, putting the focus on the lower back, abs, upper back and shoulders. The rationale for this is to maintain good posture as they run. Training these bodyparts with higher repetitions like Scott suggested earlier will help you forestall the fatigue-induced slouching that occurs during a long run. Practicing longer runs is the primary means of increasing your endurance, but weight training like that is a useful adjunct.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2007 8:25 pm 
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I am no elite runner, and no one would confuse me with one either. Running just made me really regret squats the next day.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2007 11:00 pm 
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I decided after I got back from the realm of sickness I would take it a little easier this time. I am still going to weight train for awhile and build up my run slower than I want, at least for the first month or two. Then I'll see where it goes from there (I only ran 20 minutes at good pace today). Maybe I'll lighten the load on weight training and just do more reps...that way all my muscle won't be eaten away, as long as I eat enough! (Correct me if my rationale is wrong!)


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 12:52 pm 
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Be careful, though. I gained 35 pounds training. I must be the only one in the world that can gain 35 pounds while running 50 miles a week.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 4:37 pm 
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hoosegow wrote:
Be careful, though. I gained 35 pounds training. I must be the only one in the world that can gain 35 pounds while running 50 miles a week.


The funny thing is....I was 210-215 last year mostly when running, and I could go forever. Now I am at 170 and I suck. Heh, well I lost like 40 pounds when I wasn't running. Running too loose weight always seemed stupid to me, because unless you are running REALLY far and it can outbalance the extra food, it just does not seem to work. My appetite increase exponentially when I am running, as opposed to marginally when I am weight training.


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