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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 4:10 am 
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n00b
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Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2016 1:05 am
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Hi guys,

So I've been trying to design my own program, but I'm a little confused on both set/rep ranges and progressing.

First, looking at the Weight Training Guidelines page it seems that there are some differences between the stuff from ACSM 1995 and the stuff from 2002...am I wrong for thinking I should be going mainly off the 2002 stuff being more recent? Because it almost seems to me that the 1995 stuff has more "prominence" I guess.

Also going off the 2002 stuff is there a recommendation over say the hypertrophy vs general guidelines for reps, as someone who is just a recreational lifter/looking to reach my "natural" limit in size while not getting fat while doing so...I'm torn with whether I'd say my main goal is also to get as strong as possible because I know how in general strength=size so I pretty much think of both goals as being the same thing.

I was also looking at periodization, and was thinking of doing the Undulating Periodization (the weekly example not the high-low/daily one) seeing as how I'd say I'm almost advanced but not quite. But is there any reason why a person couldn't just indefinitely stick to the very basic "stay at the weight until you can do 12 reps, then move up to where you can only do 8, and stay until you can do 12"? It seems like that's also in the general guidelines but then the page starts talking about all the different periodization methods....

Also with Undulating Periodization, would that method be used for every exercise in your program, or just the non-auxiallary exercises? And would it generally be recommended that if you did more reps than predicted (let's say on your 85% day you did 8 reps) that you adjust your 1RM/workload immediately for the next workout, or stay at the same weight for the whole cycle and then test your 1RM at the end of the cycle?

Lastly there seems to be no hard set ranges for the undulating periodization. I'm assuming the low volume training would be fine?

Thanks!


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 1:03 pm 
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Powerlifting Ninja
Powerlifting Ninja

Joined: Sun Dec 24, 2006 10:36 am
Posts: 1113
jco5055 wrote:
Hi guys,

So I've been trying to design my own program, but I'm a little confused on both set/rep ranges and progressing.

First, looking at the Weight Training Guidelines page it seems that there are some differences between the stuff from ACSM 1995 and the stuff from 2002...am I wrong for thinking I should be going mainly off the 2002 stuff being more recent? Because it almost seems to me that the 1995 stuff has more "prominence" I guess.


The American College of Sport Medicine

This is one of of the two top Personal Training Organizations.

The ACSM focus has been on cardiovascular and health. They are still playing catch up with their resistance recommendations.

Some of the information they currently provide is generic and not quite up to speed.

Quote:
Also going off the 2002 stuff is there a recommendation over say the hypertrophy vs general guidelines for reps, as someone who is just a recreational lifter/looking to reach my "natural" limit in size while not getting fat while doing so...I'm torn with whether I'd say my main goal is also to get as strong as possible because I know how in general strength=size so I pretty much think of both goals as being the same thing.


Strength and Size

"In general" strength does not equal to size; size does not necessarily equal strength.

Training for strength and size are two different type of strength training requiring different emphasis on training protocols.

That why you see smaller individuals who lift more than large bodybuilders.

Quote:
I was also looking at periodization, and was thinking of doing the Undulating Periodization (the weekly example not the high-low/daily one) seeing as how I'd say I'm almost advanced but not quite. But is there any reason why a person couldn't just indefinitely stick to the very basic "stay at the weight until you can do 12 reps, then move up to where you can only do 8, and stay until you can do 12"? It seems like that's also in the general guidelines but then the page starts talking about all the different periodization methods....


Limited Training Affect

Maintaining an exercise program of 8 - 12 repetition will increase size and strength.

However, it does not allow you to optimize you're full potential.

Research and empirical data have demonstrated that one of the major keys to increasing strength and/or size is using a variety of repetitions, sets, exercises, rest periods between sets, etc.

Hypertrophy

Research by Dr Brad Schoenfeld found the three keys are...

1) Mechanical Tension: Lifting heavy weight for low repetition with long rest periods between sets..

2) Metabolic Stress: Low to moderate load/weight and moderate to extremely high repetitions (8 repetition plus, ...20 repetition or more per set).

a) Short rest periods between sets (about 1 minute) were found to dramatically increase Metabolic Stress (The Pump) which triggered a cascade of anabolic hormones; increasing muscle mass.

The research simply documented how bodybuilder have trained for decades.

b) Long rest period between sets were found to be effective for increasing muscle mass, as well. Longer set elicit a somewhat different effect.

For maximal muscle growth, both Short and Long Rest Periods between set need to be employed at some point in one training program.

3) Muscle Damage: This is elicited by infrequently pushing an exercise to failure, eccentric training and full range movement in that placed the muscle in the fully stretched position under a lot of tension.

Examples: Full Squats, Dumbbell Bench Press, Lat Pulldown, etc.

Quote:
Also with Undulating Periodization, would that method be used for every exercise in your program, or just the non-auxiallary exercises? And would it generally be recommended that if you did more reps than predicted (let's say on your 85% day you did 8 reps) that you adjust your 1RM/workload immediately for the next workout, or stay at the same weight for the whole cycle and then test your 1RM at the end of the cycle?


Undulating Periodization Strength Training

Research by Dr Michael Zourdos (Powerlifter) found greater increases in strength were obtain with Conjugate Training (combining different strength training protocols into one program).

Example

1) Monday: Hypertrophy Training

2) Wednesday: Power Training

3) Maximal Strength Training

Zourdos' finding supports Schoenfeld.

Conjugate Training

Again, this means combining different type of strength training into one's program/Undulating Periodization Training.

The "Poster Children" for Conjugate Training are Olympic Lifters. They combine Maximal Strength Training with Power Training (Olympic movements). Research shows that Olympic movement produce some of the highest power output measured in sports.

Olympic Lifer generating up over 52 watts per kilo of body weight. Thus, a 200 lb lifter would generate around (52 watts per kilo X 98 kilos) around 5,096 watts of power!

The Westside Powerlifting Training Method that was developed circa 1980 is a Conjugate Training Program. The Westside Training Method employs Maximum Strength Training, Power/Speed Training and Repetition Method(Hypertrophy) Training.

Olympic Lifter and The Westside Powerlifting Method have successfully employed this Undulating Periodiztion Training model for decades.

Quote:
Lastly there seems to be no hard set ranges for the undulating periodization. I'm assuming the low volume training would be fine?


Undulating Periodization

There are definitive set, repetition, rest periods, etc for the different type of strength training that need to be employed in a well written Conjugate Training/Undulating Periodization Training Program.

A good article that will provide you with a quick, easy overall reference on this is...

From 0 to 100: Know Your Percentages!
https://www.t-nation.com/training/from- ... ercentages

Stu can also provide you an additional perspective and information that I may have missed.

Kenny Croxdale

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Thanks TimD.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 6:25 pm 
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n00b
n00b

Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2016 1:05 am
Posts: 10
Wow thanks for the big response, I really appreciate it!


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 12:55 pm 
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Powerlifting Ninja
Powerlifting Ninja

Joined: Sun Dec 24, 2006 10:36 am
Posts: 1113
jco5055 wrote:
Wow thanks for the big response, I really appreciate it!


That was one of my shorter responses.

You are welcome.

Kenny Croxdale

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Thanks TimD.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 10:43 pm 
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moderator
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Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:44 pm
Posts: 6593
Location: Halifax, NS
Kenny Croxdale wrote:
Stu can also provide you an additional perspective and information that I may have missed.

Kenny Croxdale


How do I top that?

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Stu Ward
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Let thy food be thy medicine, and thy medicine be thy food.~Hippocrates
Strength is the adaptation that leads to all other adaptations that you really care about - Charles Staley
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Thanks TimD


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