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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 1:47 pm 
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Was comparing normal version to this version. Was wondering if anyone on the board did either of them.

I was thinking, the one that is shown has you leaning back onto the bench (face-up, semi-supine). I can't find a demo but does anyone do it in the other direction, where you lean forward, face-down, onto the incline bench, semi-prone?

Have seen people recommend stuff like Y or W raises for traps or shoulder health done on incline bench, usually with dumbbells, so was wondering if a barbell version of it could also work.

People seem to stop at ~90 degrees with front raises, I guess to try and isolate the front delt or something, but I don't care as much about that and was wondering about the differences in going higher up. With chest on inc. bench you could lift the arms fully "overhead" while still keeping tension on the muscles. Compared to when you're standing, you can just hold it there for a long time since the bones are aligned to support it.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 6:21 pm 
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With regards to standing barbell front raises.

What I would really love is to have some EMG analysis reading's on what is happening with the lower body, particularly the glutes, hams & quads, when performing them for reps & held isometrically.


Last edited by Performance on Fri Feb 03, 2012 8:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 6:24 pm 
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Would I be right in saying that performing standing barbell front raises (isometrically) with straight legs & no knee band, there wouldn't be any chance of quadricep involvement?.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 11:37 pm 
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Performance wrote:
Would I be right in saying that performing standing barbell front raises (isometrically) with straight legs & no knee band, there wouldn't be any chance of quadricep involvement?.


No, you would not be
You need your quad muscles to stand

I'm guesing here


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 7:19 am 
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Oscar_Actuary wrote:
I'm guesing here


:roll:

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 7:23 am 
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Performance wrote:
With regards to standing barbell front raises.

What I would really love is to have some EMG analysis reading's on what is happening with the lower body, particularly the glutes, hams & quads, when performing them for reps & held isometrically.

You're too new here to know which trolls to feed and which to ignore.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2012 12:43 am 
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Oscar_Actuary wrote:
Performance wrote:
Would I be right in saying that performing standing barbell front raises (isometrically) with straight legs & no knee band, there wouldn't be any chance of quadricep involvement?.


No, you would not be
You need your quad muscles to stand

I'm guesing here


OK!. It's just that I read performing straight legged exercises, the quadriceps are taken completely out of the exercise.

Maybe it only relates to being in the supine position.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2012 4:45 am 
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Performance wrote:
OK!. It's just that I read performing straight legged exercises, the quadriceps are taken completely out of the exercise.

That's one weird thing to say. With purely upper body exercises like front raises I can't see why the quadricep-activation even matters. They are not getting work, maybe if they are in smaller angles but still, with something like a shoulder movement it never does too much eccentric or consentric work. Maybe a little bit isometric. But not enough to make it actually matter. It's not like your legs give in first when doing front raises. Ever.
Quads are one of the most important stabilizers of the leg, TFL, glutes and hamstrings to say a few mostly stabilize the hip. So no matter what you do, most likely your quads will atleast do something. When knees-locked straight-legged, the muscle contract because it's function is to extension of the knee.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2012 6:31 pm 
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I'm hoping we can perhaps avoid discussion of legs/quads because this really wasn't what I intended for it to focus on. While it's true that leaning on a bench would help to reduce leg momentum, I was thinking moreso of the shift in active lifting angle.
Performance wrote:
I would really love is to have some EMG analysis reading's on what is happening with the lower body, particularly the glutes, hams & quads, when performing them for reps & held isometrically.
I imagine some light activity due to stabilizing. Much like there is in the lower back to stop from falling forward. If it's too high compared to max output, somebody's got some weak legs.

Performance wrote:
Would I be right in saying that performing standing barbell front raises (isometrically) with straight legs & no knee band, there wouldn't be any chance of quadricep involvement?.
I imagine if the knees are locked it'd be hard to cheat weight up with quads. Probably some light activity in them assuming you're not hyperextending the knee, but shouldn't be anything significant.

Jungledoc wrote:
You're too new here to know which trolls to feed and which to ignore.
Trolling requires lying to get negative reactions. I'm stating genuine curiosities in hopes to get positive ones from those who share the interest. I regret if you are skeptical of my truthful interest in this field of study. If you are not and are simply calling me a troll to upset me when you recognize my honesty, then that would mean you would be the one trolling ;)


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