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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 3:18 am 
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n00b
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So I've already read this article here posted on this site titled "Misconceptions About Training Youth." But I still have some questions. In the article, it mentions that the majority of epiphyseal plate fractures are due to "to improper technique in the execution of the exercises and excessive loading."
What exactly constitutes as excessive loading?

I'm doing a program at the moment which emphasises high weights and low reps. At the moment, my squat is 85kg (187 pounds) and my deadlift is 90kg (198 pounds.) Is this considered excessive?
I also expect to make more linear progress because I started just last week. I'm 17 years old.

Thanks for taking time to read this.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 8:30 am 
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By age 17, your vertical growth is largely over although you will continue to start filling out your frame. However, even if it wasn't, reasonable weight training has not been shown to cause any effect to growth even in younger trainees. The risk comes from using more weight than you are prepared for. Perhaps that is due to max attempts or stunts or imporper form. This risk is not age related except that unsupervised children are more likely to engage in risky behavior.

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Let thy food be thy medicine, and thy medicine be thy food.~Hippocrates
Strength is the adaptation that leads to all other adaptations that you really care about - Charles Staley
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 4:04 am 
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Thanks for the response. Can you provide some clarification on what reasonable weight training and "lifting more weights than you are prepared for" means?
I'm aiming to achieve at least a 140kg squat before I advance to a different program. Is that an unreasonable weight?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 11:57 am 
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I didn't want to give a precise number because it varies for each person. When my son was your age, I used to train him mostly with 5 reps and even heavier at times and weights that would crush me, but it was all within his capability and always done with good form. His squat was well over 140Kg at your age but I can't remember exactly. It's becoming more common for young people to compete in powerlifting and weightlifting at young ages. They obviously use maximal weights but injuries are rare. As long as you progress at a reasonable pace, your body will adapt in a sustainable manner and you can continue to get stronger without injury. The important thing is to use common sense.

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Stu Ward
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Let thy food be thy medicine, and thy medicine be thy food.~Hippocrates
Strength is the adaptation that leads to all other adaptations that you really care about - Charles Staley
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Thanks TimD


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 4:59 pm 
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I see. Thanks heaps for your help!


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2015 1:35 pm 
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williampower wrote:
Thanks for the response. Can you provide some clarification on what reasonable weight training and "lifting more weights than you are prepared for" means?
I'm aiming to achieve at least a 140kg squat before I advance to a different program. Is that an unreasonable weight?


Like Stuward already stated and which I don`t want to repeat... I liked the following article for your question "what a reasonable weight..." is:

http://www.exrx.net/WeightTraining/Weightlifting/WFW2005.html

Or, like Boris Sheiko put it (from the official sheiko-forum):
Quote:
...Another concern in training novices is they frequently overestimate their possibilities, with a strong sense of rivalry present between them. In each training session they try to lift maximum weights which can lead to injury and poor technique development. One very important way of mitigating these issues is to group the novices so that they are all of very similar ability. This way they do not attempt to replicate what another student has done which may be beyond their current ability.

The trainee must remember that during the study of classical exercise technique, the principle value is not the weight of the bar, but rather the number of repetitions. When learning technique it is not possible to allow large stresses. Learning technique is best done with moderate weights. Then the weight on the bar increases proportionally to mastery of the exercise and improvement of the general physical state of the student. Both strong and weak stimuli are not optimal for the formation of conditioned reflexes. Only moderate stresses can ensure the successful acquisition of effective movement patterns of the classical exercises and contribute best towards physical development, which are necessary for lifting maximum weights.

In the end of the month we carry out competitions among the novices to determine the best classical exercise technique, not the amount of weight lifted. These competitions help the trainer to reveal the effectiveness of instruction as revealed by the errors of execution of exercise technique. This makes it possible to introduce corrections in the instruction procedure and to additionally include exercises which influence the correction of errors.

Thus, the primary objective for the novices is to obtain proper classical exercise technique and also the improvement of the physical condition. ...


So your main concern should always be to concentrate on proper technique. Everything else will come along with time... Setting a fixed number as a goal before switching to an intermediate program is o. k., but be flexible enough to switch earlier in case the simple programming doesn`t work anymore (or stay with it, as long as it works for you).

Good luck!


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