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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:08 am 
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I have a couple of questions regarding the "sphere" of lifting exercises...why does dynamic dominate over isometric based training? Is it more effective? I realize most lifts use some sort of isometric muscle use even when the lift is dynamic...but wouldn't an isometric-based workout be closer to real life scenarios? And what I mean by that is, generally, pushing a heavy object, lifting, and pulling don't generally use a dynamic movement 5 or 8 times to do so. Is it because it is easier to quantify "I lifted this much weight, this many times" vs "I pushed on a wall as hard as a could for 10 seconds"?. I know that isn't all isometric workouts consist of but you get the idea. Even holding a box you have lifted and moving it is more similar to isometric just holding a deadlift after you have lifted it...but I never really see any isometric-type work being done by most people.

Also...are explosive movements (Olympic style maneuvers and whatnot) easier to get into the "overtraining" zone than the previous two? I don't do very high volume workouts but since I have included some power type exercises, along with sprints, I tend to get into the cranky, I don't have the energy to workout stage.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 11:39 am 
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I guess the main problem with isometric exercises compared to dynamic exercises is that isometric exercises just strengthen the muscle at a specific joint angle. A dynamic exercise works through the whole ROM. For this reason, I think it is more effective in real life than doing only isometric training in most cases. How do you get the mentioned box in the isometrically trained position and what if you somehow can`t hold it there or have to put it somewhere else than you trained for, for other reasons? (And yes, you can`t compare "how hard you pushed against a wall" with others very well.)
On the other hand... exercises like Farmer`s walk or Planks come to my mind...

Explosive movements are normally placed at the beginning of a workout (before training for other types of strength) for a reason... If you included Sprints (Speed) and Power-Exercises (you are talking about Power Cleans or High Pulls and the like?) and left everything else unchanged, you can expect to be more exhausted, before you adapt...


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 5:31 pm 
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Rucifer wrote:
I have a couple of questions regarding the "sphere" of lifting exercises...why does dynamic dominate over isometric based training?


Dynamic over Isometrics

By "dominate", I assume you mean that dynamic movements are trained more that isometric actions.

If so, the two primary reasons are...

1) Lack of Isometric Knowledge. Individuals are unfamiliar with the training effect obtained from them. Plus, they don't know enough about isometrics to write a program.

2) Unable to measure progress. Weight have a "Yard Stick" which allows you to measure progress.

Isometrics only have a time differential.

Gym talk revolve around how much weight your pushing or pulling, not about how many seconds you pushed against an immovable object.

Functional Isometrics

The exception to is Functional Isometrics in which weight is used. Google it to find out more.

Quote:
Is it more effective?


Absolutely! Isometrics allow for an all out effort at the point of exertion.

Isometrics allow you to strengthen you "Sticking Point".

Quote:
I realize most lifts use some sort of isometric muscle use even when the lift is dynamic...but wouldn't an isometric-based workout be closer to real life scenarios? And what I mean by that is, generally, pushing a heavy object, lifting, and pulling don't generally use a dynamic movement 5 or 8 times to do so.


Isometrics are another training tool in your "Exercise Tool Box". It is an effective tool for those who know how to use it.

However, the majority of individuals never use it.

Quote:
Is it because it is easier to quantify "I lifted this much weight, this many times" vs "I pushed on a wall as hard as a could for 10 seconds"?. I know that isn't all isometric workouts consist of but you get the idea.


Yes. It primarily male ego thing.

Quote:
Even holding a box you have lifted and moving it is more similar to isometric just holding a deadlift after you have lifted it...but I never really see any isometric-type work being done by most people.


The reason is as I noted and you stated above.

Quote:
Also...are explosive movements (Olympic style maneuvers and whatnot) easier to get into the "overtraining" zone than the previous two?


No. Olympic movements basically are concentric contractions that eliminate the eccentric part of the the movement which causes the greatest muscle trauma.

There is no eccentric action with Isometrics, either.

While you can overtrain with any method, it less likely.

Quote:
I don't do very high volume workouts but since I have included some power type exercises, along with sprints, I tend to get into the cranky, I don't have the energy to workout stage.


Overtraining

You statement indicates you are in the early stages of overtraining.

Kenny Croxdale

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 7:19 am 
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This article http://bossstrengthinstitute.com/blog/2 ... r-strength talks about a study that compared full range exercise to partial range. Obviously isometric is different than partial range but this may be related to your original question. The best results came from using full range of motion exercises.

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Let thy food be thy medicine, and thy medicine be thy food.~Hippocrates
Strength is the adaptation that leads to all other adaptations that you really care about - Charles Staley
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