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Post Workout Nutrition
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Author:  George G [ Sat Dec 31, 2005 11:27 am ]
Post subject:  Post Workout Nutrition

Dr John Berardi has it all figured out here http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do? ... dy_142post

But in addition to being informative the article is also "a full fledged, in your face, introduction to a new Biotest supplement " so I have to be cautious.

My current post workout nutrition consists of a regular meal. An example meal might be: chicken breast, rice, vegetables.

Should I reconsider this? What has been your experience with various post workout drinks?

Thank you.

Author:  TimD [ Sat Dec 31, 2005 12:34 pm ]
Post subject: 

Hi George. Well, I read that article, and I can't and wouldn't disagree with Berardi when it comes to the science. It is a pretty blatant ad for a new Biotest product however. My experience has been that right after a workout, I generally have no apetite whatsoever for solid food, so I usually take a post workout shake in similar poportions to what Berardi is talking about, and try to keep the carbs somewhat high up on the glycemic index. Now, your choice of solid food isn't bad. Maybe add some high glycemic fruit if you wish to. In one of Berardi's other articles, he comes right out and says that supplements only make up to a 5% difference, and unless you've already laid a strong foundatio, they won't really matter that much
Tim

Author:  George G [ Sat Dec 31, 2005 12:38 pm ]
Post subject: 

TimD wrote:
Hi George. Well, I read that article, and I can't and wouldn't disagree with Berardi when it comes to the science. It is a pretty blatant ad for a new Biotest product however. My experience has been that right after a workout, I generally have no apetite whatsoever for solid food, so I usually take a post workout shake in similar poportions to what Berardi is talking about, and try to keep the carbs somewhat high up on the glycemic index. Now, your choice of solid food isn't bad. Maybe add some high glycemic fruit if you wish to. In one of Berardi's other articles, he comes right out and says that supplements only make up to a 5% difference, and unless you've already laid a strong foundatio, they won't really matter that much
Tim


Tim,

Do you make the shake yourself?

P.S. Thanks for moving the topic to the approporiate forum.

Author:  TimD [ Sat Dec 31, 2005 2:11 pm ]
Post subject: 

Yes, I used to make them myself. It all depended on what I had on hand. Sometimes I went with a straight MRP, at other times I might mix some straight protein powder with milk or fruit juice. I think my two favorites are a vanilla protein powder mixe with about 6 oz of pineapple juice with milk or water, and a vanilla or strawberry flavored powder with some milk and frozen strawberries. . I also took a couple of ish oil tabs separately. Your imagination is the only limiting factor. I've seen some people turn it into a gainer, and add ice cream and peanut butter, but I like the lower calorie, yet nutient dense stuff better.
Tim

Author:  dian in spokane [ Sun Jan 01, 2006 12:35 pm ]
Post subject: 

I just have to add a tip on my favorite way to make post workout shakes bearable. I freeze my bananas right when they get so ripe that I have to either use them or throw them out.

I just peel and slice them, and put them in individual ziploc bags. Then I toss them in the blender with my protein shakes.

It makes them thick and icy like a milk shake. Makes almost any lousy protein shake better.

I generally start with a regular vanilla protein shake, and I often add a little chocolate (it doesn't take much)

You can get pretty inexpensive protein mixes on the web without going for any particular brand. I think there isn't a lot of difference

although.. a regular meal is great too!

dian

Author:  Drew [ Tue Jan 03, 2006 9:10 am ]
Post subject: 

I do my workouts in the evening after I put the kids to bed. And since I end up finishing shortly before I go to bed myself, I prefer a shake to solid food. I've found that 2 scoops of chocolate whey protein powder mixed with 8 oz water or milk and 8 oz OJ makes it taste like an Orange Julius. Not quite sure why, but I stumbled on it and like it.

Author:  CDB [ Tue Jan 03, 2006 9:48 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Post Workout Nutrition

George G wrote:
Dr John Berardi has it all figured out here http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do? ... dy_142post

But in addition to being informative the article is also "a full fledged, in your face, introduction to a new Biotest supplement " so I have to be cautious.

My current post workout nutrition consists of a regular meal. An example meal might be: chicken breast, rice, vegetables.

Should I reconsider this? What has been your experience with various post workout drinks?

Thank you.


A shake isn't a bad idea. It's digested quicker and available sooner. A regular meal is optimal, though not always feasible. I'd be suspect of anything from T Nation or Biotest. Just not the best company/site in my opinion.

Author:  Nunya [ Wed Jan 11, 2006 10:35 am ]
Post subject: 

I take a protein shake on days that I lift weights. Should I also take one on days where I only do cardio, or days where I don't do anything at all and relax?

Author:  TimD [ Wed Jan 11, 2006 11:53 am ]
Post subject: 

Protein powders are just a supplement. Pure and simple. If you are not getting enough in your diet, then it's an easy, convenient way to get your requirement met. After a workout, a shake is often used, because of it's convenience and it's an easy way to get post workout nutrition, especially if you are like me and wouldn't even think of choking down solid food at that time. On off days, your body is in maint/repair mode, and again, you have certain protein requirements (along with carb, fat, and other nutrients), and if you aren't getting your requirements met, then take a shake. If you just want to take a shake, then fine, but it certainly is not necessary. IMO thise workout drinks are way overhyped. Protein powder is nt a magic bullet, it just helps you get your requirements met if you are deficient (which by the way, most Americans are NOT).
Tim

Author:  CDB [ Wed Jan 11, 2006 12:09 pm ]
Post subject: 

TimD wrote:
Protein powder is nt a magic bullet, it just helps you get your requirements met if you are deficient (which by the way, most Americans are NOT).
Tim


Evidence for which can be seen at the local mall's food court.

I'd offer one modification to this, and that is on off days get whole food. Protein shakes are absorbed very fast and are more suited for use around workouts where quick bioavailability of protein and carbs is needed. From a nutrition and cost effectiveness standpoint it's best to use them on workout days, pre, post or both.

During off days you really should have a good, constant stream of nutrients and whole food is the best option. For protein, beef jerkey or canned/bagged tuna, and for carbs, raw oatmeal and flax meal are good options for portable food sources. I always have a few cans of tuna in my desk at work. Take it easy on the flax though. That much fiber and protein in your diet is sure to liven up your digestive system if you're not used to it.

If you want to use a shake to help fill out a caloric defecit and turn it into a surplus, don't use the shake to replace a meal, use to augment one.

Author:  DELETED [ Tue Nov 02, 2010 5:20 am ]
Post subject:  fergus

DELETED

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