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Developing Real Athletic Speed
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Author:  Jason Nunn [ Tue Jul 06, 2010 3:31 pm ]
Post subject:  Developing Real Athletic Speed

Kind of off topic (Maybe?) for this forum, but here's a new article.

Developing Real Athletic Speed

I would've posted it here, but it has embedded videos, ect. and wouldn't work.

Author:  pdellorto [ Tue Jul 06, 2010 5:13 pm ]
Post subject: 

Telling us you wrote more stuff is pretty much on-topic, I think.

Author:  Jungledoc [ Tue Jul 06, 2010 9:58 pm ]
Post subject: 

More-or-less incidentally, has anyone besides me looked at Jason's videos on You Tube? They are (for the most part) brief and to the point. You don't have to watch 15 reps of the same thing over and over, nor do you have to watch extraneous stuff while waiting for the real content. He shows 2 or 3 reps and cuts to the next thing. They are taken with clear camera angles so you can see what he's doing, and are set up so that the light is decent. When he doesn't have needed audio (most don't) he mutes the audio so you don't have to listen to amplified background noise. Not professionally-produced, but well-done basic amateur videography, which is all I need. Content is very good, some technique for specific exercises, some dynamic warm-ups, etc. I even came across one of his wedding, but it didn't have any real exercises in it! :lol:

Author:  ApolytonGP [ Tue Jul 06, 2010 11:52 pm ]
Post subject: 

It's a lot of good content and I appreciate sharing, but it was a little hard for me to process. Think, given all the work you're doing, might try to take it even a notch higher.

1. Felt like you were talking to people who had already seen other speed programs and you were just trying to differentiate from that. But I and a lot of readers don't have that background. Feels too in group, if you get my drift. There's probably a way to describe alternate theories and how you disagree with them. but the stuff about "other people don't do it right, and I do"...it kind of made me want to see evidence of how many other people don't do it right. and then again, do you really want to define yourself in that manner, anyhow?

2. Also, it seems like there were a lot of comments about drills, not being proven to result in speed, but the same could be said of your program (or any) unless you're somehow testing the results by actual speed. I guess you are trying to connect it to a theory that will result in speed...but still that is not tested speed. And anyhow, I didn't really understand the theory.

3. Seems like some of what you are developing is not speed, but agility. Also, obviously drills are useful for any complicated activity. I mean people do scales, when you learn an instrument! But, wouldn't they be pretty different based on the sport? (you sort of adreess this, but I coulnd't be clear if there is an all different program or you try to have all athletes do all types of drills, also I'm not clear how all this is integrated with their sports training).

Author:  Jungledoc [ Wed Jul 07, 2010 3:32 am ]
Post subject: 

I think his target audience is other strength and conditioning coaches.

Author:  KPj [ Wed Jul 07, 2010 3:57 am ]
Post subject: 

I don't think Poly actually read the whole article, otherwise half the points he made wouldn't of made enough sense to post.

Anyway, good article Jason and thanks for posting. It's good to see more material coming from you.

Jungledoc - Yes I watch his videos, subscribe to his blog, and am generally quite envious of his strength! :grin:

Author:  Jason Nunn [ Wed Jul 07, 2010 5:36 am ]
Post subject: 

Jungledoc wrote:
More-or-less incidentally, has anyone besides me looked at Jason's videos on You Tube? They are (for the most part) brief and to the point. You don't have to watch 15 reps of the same thing over and over, nor do you have to watch extraneous stuff while waiting for the real content. He shows 2 or 3 reps and cuts to the next thing. They are taken with clear camera angles so you can see what he's doing, and are set up so that the light is decent. When he doesn't have needed audio (most don't) he mutes the audio so you don't have to listen to amplified background noise. Not professionally-produced, but well-done basic amateur videography, which is all I need. Content is very good, some technique for specific exercises, some dynamic warm-ups, etc. I even came across one of his wedding, but it didn't have any real exercises in it! :lol:


Thanks for watching the vids. Most of them were put together for a certain project. Some were for local factories and some were for a few local fire departments.

The wedding is NOT me. It's another guy that has the same name lol. The weirdest thing is that my sister's name is Brandy. Which is the name of the bride in that video...gross. :lol:

I'll respond to the other comments in a bit, I've got some clients coming in to train.

Author:  wilburburns [ Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:06 am ]
Post subject: 

I thought the article was quite good. Simple and to the point.

As for the target audience, I'm not a strength or any type of coach and fully understood what Jason was saying. My only experience would be as a former amateur Athlete (as in elementary and middle school, way to many years ago) and someone who has watched some of the NBA Combines and other sports prep shows on TV.

I'll definetely check out some of Jason's other Videos. And Yes, I'm also envious of his strength and conditioning, because I will likely never be half as strong, due to lack of work on my part. :wink:

Cliff

Author:  Jason Nunn [ Wed Jul 07, 2010 12:06 pm ]
Post subject: 

ApolytonGP wrote:
Think, given all the work you're doing, might try to take it even a notch higher.


I agree. More on that later.
Quote:

1. Felt like you were talking to people who had already seen other speed programs and you were just trying to differentiate from that. But I and a lot of readers don't have that background. Feels too in group, if you get my drift. There's probably a way to describe alternate theories and how you disagree with them. but the stuff about "other people don't do it right, and I do"...it kind of made me want to see evidence of how many other people don't do it right. and then again, do you really want to define yourself in that manner, anyhow? [/quote}

That article was meant for other people who train athletes for a living, hence the comment about it being possible off topic. So, yes I was talking to other people who have already seen other speed programs.
[qoute]
2. Also, it seems like there were a lot of comments about drills, not being proven to result in speed, but the same could be said of your program (or any) unless you're somehow testing the results by actual speed. I guess you are trying to connect it to a theory that will result in speed...but still that is not tested speed. And anyhow, I didn't really understand the theory.


I test my athetes regularly. They do my drills; they get faster and better at their given sport.
Quote:
3. Seems like some of what you are developing is not speed, but agility. Also, obviously drills are useful for any complicated activity. I mean people do scales, when you learn an instrument! But, wouldn't they be pretty different based on the sport? (you sort of adreess this, but I coulnd't be clear if there is an all different program or you try to have all athletes do all types of drills, also I'm not clear how all this is integrated with their sports training).


This is just a brief exerpt of my program. If I wrote out my entire program, it would be a book, not an article. I don't have time for that. You're missing the point. Yes, I do individualize my programs to fit the needs of the athlete, but it still boils down to whether or not the athlete can sprint, change direction, and jump efficiently. So, usually, there are more similarities than differences.

As far as the speed versus agility thing, your arguing over semantics. Most of my athletes come from basketball, soccer, and football. Given this, they will hardley ever run a distance greater than 10 - 20yards in a straight line. So, it doesn't make sense to spend much time working on linear speed - although we still do spend a little.

Thanks for the compliment fellas (I'm assuming you're guys) :lol:

Honestly, not very happy with the article. Probably should've went into more detail in my own progressions, even though I initially thought it was beyond the scope of the article. Also, they messed with my formatting and changed the pictures. I was a little peeved. Also, they put the wrong website at the bottom.

Oh well, is what it is.

Author:  ApolytonGP [ Wed Jul 07, 2010 12:31 pm ]
Post subject: 

thanks for the detailed response, man. lot of content in there.

Switching from editor mode, to content mode:

Any experience or reading or opinion on the needs of javelin throwers? How about gymnasts on the vault exercise (especially those pushing the difficulty boundary in terms of number of flips and twists). Intuitively, I would think both have a runup before the "release". And that higher horizontal speed translates into 45 degree flight (of object or body) And in both cases, the releases is somewhat of a technical movement (and you can't overrun). I would think top end speed might help the spear thrower more, since the movement seems less technical...but I really don't know...just like to talk and think on the message boards.

Author:  Jason Nunn [ Wed Jul 07, 2010 1:55 pm ]
Post subject: 

Quote:
Any experience or reading or opinion on the needs of javelin throwers? How about gymnasts on the vault exercise (especially those pushing the difficulty boundary in terms of number of flips and twists). Intuitively, I would think both have a runup before the "release". And that higher horizontal speed translates into 45 degree flight (of object or body) And in both cases, the releases is somewhat of a technical movement (and you can't overrun). I would think top end speed might help the spear thrower more, since the movement seems less technical...but I really don't know...just like to talk and think on the message boards.


Keep in mind I'm a strength coach. Not a throws or gynastics coach. From my prospective:

Javelin = Strong Anti rotation, explosive hip extension, also may need to address the rotator cuff and probable glenohumeral internal rotation deficit. Similiar to pitchers in baseball.

Gynastics = I don't have much experiance with, but just shooting from the hip = good relative body strength, explosiveness/plyos/oly lifts, general joint mobility/stability

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