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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 3:45 pm 
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In the biomechanical deficiencies area of this site, there are sections for areas of weakness and such. Example below:

Hamstrings Weakness
Increased risk of knee injury (instability) occur during knee extension activities, specifically when knees are flexed more than 90°. When hip and knee are simultaneously extending during a compound movement, hamstrings counter the anteriorly directed forces of Quadriceps. Also see Knee Stability and Angle of Pull for force vector explanation. Hamstrings / Quadriceps strength ratios should be greater than 56% to 80% depending on the population tested.

Examples of affected exercises: Squat
Leg Press
Example preventative / corrective exercises:
Leg Curls
Straight Leg Deadlift

Where it says "examples of affected exercised" (in red) does that mean exercises that will aggravate the weakness?

Thanks!


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 4:19 pm 
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The way I read it is that there is a greater chance of injuring your knees by doing squats or leg press if you don't correct your hamstring weakness. Squats and leg press may or may not make the problem worse depending on your technique. However if you have weak hamstrings, chances are you should start doing RDLs.

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Let thy food be thy medicine, and thy medicine be thy food.~Hippocrates
Strength is the adaptation that leads to all other adaptations that you really care about - Charles Staley
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 5:23 pm 
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what would be a good way to tell, assuming you dont have a way to do leg curls.
I'm not sure other than I'm weak all over, whether my hammies lag or not.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 5:46 pm 
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I think the proper way is leg ext to leg curl. I don't think you get the right ratio otherwise. What you could do is compare your RDL to front squat but think it should be closer to 100% or over rather than 56 to 80%. I know once my RDL passed my back squat, my squat started to go up.

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Stu Ward
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Let thy food be thy medicine, and thy medicine be thy food.~Hippocrates
Strength is the adaptation that leads to all other adaptations that you really care about - Charles Staley
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Thanks TimD


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 6:02 pm 
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my RDL is better than Back Squat
My dead is 50% higher than the Squat, so, maybe its the quads that lag...also weak core so I have trouble staying upright... and tight shoulders....

Ok, thank for that info. That's good general stuff, Probably I'm not in danger zone then.
Thanks to you all here I've kept a pretty balanced program


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