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Repetition Ranges
http://exrx.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=8273
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Author:  Institutionalized [ Thu Sep 01, 2011 6:09 pm ]
Post subject:  Repetition Ranges

I am trying to get my hands on research or related material about the effects of different rep ranges in weight training. I see this issue debated a lot everywhere but little evidence posted, if any, and it bugs me, for one cause I would really like to read about it and second, because there is so much "information" out there its pretty confusing.

Seeing as this place is civilized and pretty reasonable Id like to see what I can gather from here.

Thanks in advance!

Author:  stuward [ Thu Sep 01, 2011 6:23 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

The trouble is that the research is really lacking. There is some and I'll look for it but there really isn't much "science" behind the recommendations. It's pretty much based on what works and what doesn't, which, from a "science" point of view is mere anecdotal.

Author:  stuward [ Thu Sep 01, 2011 6:33 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

This article is important basic reading: http://drsquat.com/content/knowledge-ba ... ning-split

This article was pretty good when it was written (2007). http://www.bodybuildingweb.net/blog/bes ... le-growth/

This one written in 2010 came to the same conclusion. http://www.simplyshredded.com/strong-sc ... sults.html
Quote:
Regardless of what the study found to be optimal, no single rep range, total number of sets or training frequency will give you optimal results forever. You need to mix it up and change these variables from time to time. You are an individual and should train like one.


This article (with references) says that as long as you get over 60% load, your good. http://www.exercisebiology.com/index.ph ... le_growth/

Here's a good debate on last year's controversial 30% is as good as 90% study. Lots of good links and good analysis. http://www.leangains.com/2010/08/high-r ... -gain.html

My summary of all this is to vary your rep ranges. Include light and heavy days. Put some effort into. Don't just go in, do the reps and leave. Take each set to the point where form starts to break down and stop. You need to reach the point where it's hard to do the last rep but not so hard that you can't do it. I don't see the point in going past 20 reps or so but personally, my lower body has more stamina, so on light (60%) leg presses, I could get up there.

Author:  uggy [ Thu Sep 01, 2011 8:05 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

Very nice post Stuward; thanks :grin: .

Author:  Jungledoc [ Thu Sep 01, 2011 9:58 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

There are basically 2 reasons to do research: to discover previously unknown truth or to settle a controversy. Something that is universally, or even almost universally accepted may not attract the attention of researchers. It's only when a question about something comes up that someone is willing to invest time and money to find an answer. The fear of researchers is that their conclusions will be met with "so what? We already know that." It's usually only when there has been a clear challenge to "common knowledge" that studies are done.

Author:  Jungledoc [ Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:02 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

BTW, Stu--great compilation of studies. I'll look at them all in detail later. Thanks.

Author:  Institutionalized [ Fri Sep 02, 2011 10:09 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

Jungledoc wrote:
There are basically 2 reasons to do research: to discover previously unknown truth or to settle a controversy. Something that is universally, or even almost universally accepted may not attract the attention of researchers. It's only when a question about something comes up that someone is willing to invest time and money to find an answer. The fear of researchers is that their conclusions will be met with "so what? We already know that." It's usually only when there has been a clear challenge to "common knowledge" that studies are done.


But in this case, "common knowledge" has been on debate for a long while. We dont actually "know", do we? I think its pretty clear by now that the challenge is out there.

Thanks for the links, stu.

Author:  Jungledoc [ Fri Sep 02, 2011 9:52 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

Well, I guess I've missed out on the debate. I still see "low rep=strength, high rep=hypertrophy, very high rep=endurance" pretty-well accepted as gospel.

Author:  CorlessJohnJ [ Sat Sep 03, 2011 12:31 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

From ACE's Essentials of Exercise Science for Fitness professionals Chapter Three pg 142.

"Using free weights or elastic tubing, individuals can perform from shoulder raises in sets of eight to 12 repitions."

This is referring to strength gaining rep ranges. It didn't mention % of one rep max or if muscle hypertrophy was acheived. This straight out of my ACE text. I have been highlighting stuff that seems to be interesting here's another interesting things I read last night.

Chapter 3 pg 138
"Concentric activity of the pectoralis minor results in abduction, depression, and downward rotation of the scapula. However, if the scapular adductors are weak, fatigued, or injured, the muscular tension created by the pectoralis minor will tilt the scapulae forward and down, worsening a rounder- shoulders posture(kyphosis)"

Didn't realise certain work and or injuries could change posture that is crazy.

John Corless

Author:  stuward [ Sat Sep 03, 2011 12:35 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

That's why working your rhomboids are so important. When I had my shoulder injury, that was what the therapist dove right into. Half my rehab was strengthening my rhomboids, the rest was actually shoulders.

Author:  jlmoss [ Sat Sep 03, 2011 12:56 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

I feel the same with massage. In class, and in the training sessions that I gave throughout, everyone wanted work done on their back. I would watch their posture as they came in with rounded back. It's just not good to do deep tissue work on the back if a person is already rounded in the back. So, I usually just did superficial work on the back and really dug in on the front. Much to the dismay of the practice person since they are usually so tight and sore in the front, but I finished knowing that I helped straighten them out a little more.

Author:  Institutionalized [ Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:21 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/non ... lmyth.html

Something I found around, very interesting.

Author:  CorlessJohnJ [ Mon Sep 05, 2011 8:41 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

Institutionalized wrote:
http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/nonfunctionalmyth.html

Something I found around, very interesting.


Very good read definitely just read the whole thing. Best bang for your buck? Exactly the rep range I'm at 8 or 80 to 85% of your one rep max :) good read.

Author:  uggy [ Tue Sep 06, 2011 10:22 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

stuward wrote:
That's why working your rhomboids are so important. When I had my shoulder injury, that was what the therapist dove right into. Half my rehab was strengthening my rhomboids, the rest was actually shoulders.


How did you go about strengthening the Rhomboids? Any exercises in particular?

Author:  stuward [ Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:03 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Repetition Ranges

In ExRx they're all grouped under General Back. An rowing motion will engege them but having the elbows out preferentiall recruits them relative to the lats. Dan John came up with an isolation exercise called "Bat Wings". Do a search. It's been discussed here before. In my opinion, the best big exercise for the rhomboids is Pendlay Rows. http://exrx.net/WeightExercises/BackGen ... erRow.html

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