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 Post subject: best quad exercise
PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2005 6:45 pm 
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just wondering...cause i do legs all on one day and i do squat, straight leg/back deadlift, good morning, step ups and lunges all in one day. Then I also do sprints once a week. Just wondering if I should be doing this, because the other two days in the gym i do chest shoulders bis on one day and back and tris the other. I like lunges and step ups more than the others, but people tell me the others are much better for you. Any advice, thanks!


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 Post subject: Re: best quad exercise
PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:18 pm 
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leif3141 wrote:
just wondering...cause i do legs all on one day and i do squat, straight leg/back deadlift, good morning, step ups and lunges all in one day. Then I also do sprints once a week. Just wondering if I should be doing this, because the other two days in the gym i do chest shoulders bis on one day and back and tris the other. I like lunges and step ups more than the others, but people tell me the others are much better for you. Any advice, thanks!


I'd be in favor of ditching the lunges altogether (except you claim to like them. These are dumbell lunges right?)

Then, personally, I'd switch your bis and tris, doing your triceps the same day as chest, and your biceps on your PULL day. If that seems too light on your back day, you could add in another hamstring exercise. Are you doing conventional or sumo deadlifts on your back day?

dian in spokane


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 8:43 am 
Are you wanting to isolate the quads specifically? Hell, leg extensions do that.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 10:17 am 
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Personally, I see nothing at all wrong with lunge or step ups. I think, that overall, the squat is king, but the lunge and step ups work the lower body in a way that squats really don't, and lunges in particular are great for hip flexibility. I usually do them as a split squat - bar held at shoulders, and split from there. It;s a throw back to the old split style of O lifting, when the movement used to be a staple. Just my .02
Tim


Last edited by TimD on Wed Dec 28, 2005 4:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 12:00 pm 
I tend to agree with Tim on this matter but I also send it one step more, I do standard medium stance squats squats and then follow them up with wide stance front squats with bar across clavicles. Then I go to assist moves like lunges and leg extentions. Sprints on off days are a great way to add a different dimension along with plyometric jump squats or different height box jumps.

I keep direct shoulder workout seperate than chest/tris and back/bis on a different day themselves. For a second day of heavy tri/bis I will throw them in with shoulders.

Desire, Dedication, Discipline

Scott Ismari


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 5:30 am 
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What do you mean by best? Isolates the best? Produces the most hypertrophy? To me, "best" means the exercise that will help ____ while doing the most for the rest of me at the same time. So in this case the answer would be squat.

Also, I don't see how people can give specific programing advice without knowing any more about the OP--age, experience lifting, weight, goals, etc., etc.

I agree with Tim (I almost always do :grin: ) about single-leg work. I'd never tell somone to lose lunges without a darn good reason. Maybe suggest variations of single-leg work that they can do, but single-let is too valuable to leave out altogether.


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 Post subject: Re: best quad exercise
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 8:43 am 
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leif3141 wrote:
just wondering...cause i do legs all on one day and i do squat, straight leg/back deadlift, good morning, step ups and lunges all in one day. Then I also do sprints once a week. Just wondering if I should be doing this, because the other two days in the gym i do chest shoulders bis on one day and back and tris the other. I like lunges and step ups more than the others, but people tell me the others are much better for you. Any advice, thanks!


Straight leg deads and good mornings are a bit redundant in the same workout, but the other exercises make for a good leg workout.

And for people who say that step-ups aren't a valuable exercise, it should be noted that Eastern European Olympic weightlifting training programs have largelyreplaced the back squat with a high step up:

Quote:
Ten years ago, the full squat was the foundation of exercise programs for almost all elite athletes in the Soviet Bloc nations, whether they were weightlifters or not. Soviet athletes - be they wrestlers, runners, fencers, soccer player or swimmers - all squatted. But because the retired hammer thrower had won the gold medal in the 1976 Olympic Games and because he was a respected graduate of the Central Institute for Physical Education and Sport in Moscow, his opinions were taken seriously. His name: Anatoly Bondarchuk. His studies led him to conclude that a particular form of what we'll call the high step-up had two significant advantages over the standard back squat. Bondarchuk concluded that high step-ups, firstly, produce greater gains in thigh and hip power and secondly, cause fewer injuries.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 12:15 pm 
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This is a zombie topic.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 3:50 pm 
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What do you mean by zombie topic?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 4:00 pm 
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The thread is 4 yrs old.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 5:34 pm 
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:red:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 5:36 pm 
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Still, Stephen's information about the "high step-up" is really interesting.

Stephen, do you know how high? Enough so that the thigh is parallel?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 18, 2009 8:21 pm 
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Jungledoc wrote:
do you know how high? Enough so that the thigh is parallel?


From the article:

Quote:
Finally, he concluded that the ideal position generally occurred when the athlete was standing on the toes of one foot with the other foot flat on the bench and the top of the raised thigh parallel to the floor.


That seems to suggest that the working leg is slightly above parallel when the lifter is standing flat footed, since it is parallel when he is standing on his tip toes.

That's an academic point for me - when I do step-ups, my working leg is below parallel. I try to take long steps so my glutes get the brunt of the work. Sort of a bastardization of the step-up and lunge. Taking long high steps would be an invitation for my kissing the floor. :wink:

Quote:
As he began to experiment with different heights, he soon realized that he could achieve complete development of the thighs and hips by using varying bench heights, depending on the needs of the individual athlete. Being well-schooled in anatomy and physiology, he understood that the higher the bench, the more stress would be placed on the hamstring muscles on the rear of the thigh. Conversely, he understood that a lower bench would result in more work being required of the quadriceps muscles on the front of the thigh.


Nothing is said about varying the length of the step to work different parts of the legs and hips, but based on DOMS, I think that I'm doing the right thing.


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 Post subject: raphael
PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2010 7:06 am 
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