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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 11:55 pm 
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Deific Wizard of Sagacity
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What's the difference between the Floor Press and the Bench Press in terms of muscles worked? I've read that this focuses more on the triceps than the deltoids and pectorals.

I've also read that it is safer because of the reduced range of motion. I dunno, it just seems equivalent to doing a partial bench press with your feet up on the bench without the fear of overbalancing and falling off.


I'm not looking to do this just yet (I just started my new routine for goodness sakes), but I'm curious what the benefits are if I ever do. I can see one safety benefit - I can't move the bench into the rack at my gym (wouldn't fit), but I can lie down in the rack, set the safety bars at my start position and do floor presses with absolutely no fear of dropping the weight.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 3:13 am 
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I think the main benefit is the safety aspect. For example, i'm doing a rehabilitation program for an injured shoulder and I do quite a lot of BB and DB floor pressing and will gradually progress to full range of motion bench press.

It's also used to increase strength from the mid point of a traditional bench press if this part of the ROM is a weakness. Same concept as the 'Board Press'.

Here's a good description of it,

http://www.criticalbench.com/floor-press.htm

Also, it's not quite like a bench press with your feet up as it's normally done with an arched back and bench pressing with your feet up will flatten/straighten your spine. That's mentioned in the link anyway...

Even when I am able to bench again, which i am very close to, I will do floor press every so often just to give my shoulders a break... Which is worth a thought 'down the line' in your training..

KPj


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 7:01 am 
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I do my 1 arm DB presses on the floor. It allows you to rotate your torso to elevate the load. This gives extra work to the stabilizers especially your lats and core. It's a good progression to turkish getups.
http://www.wannabebig.com/article.php?articleid=214


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 7:15 am 
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The short answer is range of motion. KPJ gave the reason you might want less. But you generally want more. Powerlifters do a lot of floor press, because you can use more weight with the lower range of motion.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 10:11 am 
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So are floor presses good for size? because I am at my cousins home for the next 2 months and he has a few heavy dumbells around but no bench.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 10:46 am 
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Well, they can't hurt. Not optimal though, because of the ROM issues alreakdy discussed. They are usually used by powerlifters to help work their lockoutstrength of the upper arms. IMHO, a bridge press would be much better.Put the DB's down on either side of you, go into a wrestlers bridge, then do your db bench presses. This also gives you good overall neck strength. This used to be a staple back in the dark ages when I was wrestling in HS and college. Another better substitute would be P bar dips or push ups between benches or chairs. These allow the full ROM as well, and both can be weighted through innovation.
Tim


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 11:11 am 
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Tim, not being a wrestler do you have a good reference for the bridge press? I can't picture it in my head.

Helping out with lockout strength is also why I do them. Somebody correct me if I have it all wrong, but I pause relaxing my chest for a split second when my elbows are resting on the floor. This removes any bounce or rebound effect from my muscles tightening up. I then explode up as fast as I can. Since I started routinely including floor pressing in my training, my numbers have seem to go up a little faster.

BTW, new personal best for bench last week - 350 raw. I think I could have gotten 355 but my spotter screwed up in my first attempt. 400 by 40


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 12:59 pm 
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Here is the bridge, plus instructions. Just imagine getting into that position and then doing presses.
http://www.tacticalathlete.com/bridge2.htm
Tim


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 3:33 pm 
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TimD wrote:
Well, they can't hurt. Not optimal though, because of the ROM issues alreakdy discussed. They are usually used by powerlifters to help work their lockoutstrength of the upper arms. IMHO, a bridge press would be much better.Put the DB's down on either side of you, go into a wrestlers bridge, then do your db bench presses. This also gives you good overall neck strength. This used to be a staple back in the dark ages when I was wrestling in HS and college. Another better substitute would be P bar dips or push ups between benches or chairs. These allow the full ROM as well, and both can be weighted through innovation.
Tim


WOW! This one is totaly new to me!

I love these type of exercises because they are so efficient. I have always thought about training my neck, but never got around to it after all the pulling and pushing. Now I can push and train the neck at the same time!

Thank you, Tim!


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 9:12 am 
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Isn't the bridge press a little strenous on the lower back ? And when I press wouldn't the weight of the db's somehow harm my neck ? If its safe I will give it a go after I mastered the bridge without weights.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2007 10:56 am 
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By all means, master the bridge without weight first. But when you are ready, it's a great overall move, especially for wrestlers and MMA types. Used to be a staple for wrestlers. We used to have out partner sit on our chest while we rolled left, right, fore and aft on our heads.
Tim


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