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PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 3:50 pm 
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I have been told by a professional that these exercises are important for the health of your shoulder. (Good exercises to add to a routine...)

This web site has them listed, however I think when I looked the form was not explained 100% correctly/fully.

External rotation is listed as lying external rotation but can be performed standing.

Internal Rotation: One thing to remember is that your arm should be held against you body during the exercise. Elbow against side. You can use a towel to ensure this (if you drop the towel you have bad form).

External Rotation: When performing this exercise there are two things to keep in mind. The first is that your arm is held against your body (as in the previous exercise). The second involves the motion of the exercise. Your arm should only be rotated to 90 degrees from your body. It is important not to exceed 90 degrees. (arm straight out from body)(chest and arm make a 90 degree angle). This is not the elbow position...It is the angle created by the rotation. Although the elbow position should also be 90 degrees.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:53 am 
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Your rotator cuff is created by your internal/external rotators. Both of these muscles are crucial in shoulder stability and should never be neglected. Your external rotators (teres major/minor & infraspinatus) can either be done standing or seated. Same goes for your internal rotators (supraspinatus & subscapularis).

Use dumbbells and always do full range of motions. Play around with the angles because you want to target all of the fibers in every muscle.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 26, 2008 5:51 am 
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jamezgt wrote:
Your rotator cuff is created by your internal/external rotators. Both of these muscles are crucial in shoulder stability and should never be neglected. Your external rotators (teres major/minor & infraspinatus) can either be done standing or seated. Same goes for your internal rotators (supraspinatus & subscapularis).

Use dumbbells and always do full range of motions. Play around with the angles because you want to target all of the fibers in every muscle.


The pectoral muscles and latissimus dorsi muscles act as internal rotators as well, although they're not part of the rotator cuff. This is due to their attachment to the humerus (upper arm bone).


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PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2009 4:07 pm 
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In terms of frequency:

Would 1-2 sets of about 10 reps twice a week be about right?


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PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2009 4:31 pm 
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quad6 wrote:
In terms of frequency:

Would 1-2 sets of about 10 reps twice a week be about right?


I do 2 sets of 25 reps at least twice a week with Therabands. Tie a knot in one end and trap it in a door etc. Cheap and i find much better than dumbbells as you can control the ROM much better and have constant tension on the muscles. As you fail you can move nearer the door to decrease the tension (or drop set). Equally move away to make it harder. Add more bands as required.

I added these to my routine thanks to NNM. I had a very noticable 'POP' coming from my left shoulder for months and now its almost gone.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 1:00 am 
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the rotator cuff group works to stabilize the head of the humerous in the glenoid cavity during gross shoulder movements, its the primarly stabilizer for the joint.

If correct posture, form and technique is emphasised then your RC will get a decent work out in the usal suspects of all upper limb exercises.

if however there is an imjury, or postural problem then RC should be included.

the biggest problem is that most people emphasise the pecs and latts, which as stated above are very strong intrernal rotators. Combined with excessive biceps exercises a bad Upper body program will predispose a person to impingement be training poor posture.

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