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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 5:03 am 
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I know Im really young but Ive finally narrowed down why I get hip pains sometiems. I always used to think its ebcause I squat 3 times a week but 2 weeks ago, I did an extra day of deadlifts and my hips felt so sore and hurt and I actually couldnt squat more than 2 sets on my squat day. I dropped the deadlifts altogether this week and I feel amazing again. I can squat really heavy and there is absolutely no soreness at all. I want to know why deadlifts hurt me so much. I do everything with as good as form as possible and if you dont believe me just look at the video of me squatting that I posted. I can post a pic of me deadlifting but Ive already had several one of my friends, 2 coaches, and one trainer if my form was okay and they said absolutely. I want to know if there is any solution to this because I dont want to stop deadlifting for the res of my life but If i have to i will. Its just that I dont know any other exercise that is that damn good for hamstrings and lowerback.

I was thinking that I can reset after every rep. Like maybe if I release the bar after each rep, reset my feet and grip, it wont hurt so much or maybe drop it down a little faster? I'm not sure. If anyone can help me , I will be very greatful. Ive had this problem for well over 2 or 3 years now and it sucks. In fact I think I had this problem even longer but I never used to deadlift like I do now. COuld it just be my body? Is there an exercise I can do that fixes this problem? Muscle Imbalance?(Although i really try to hit all movements as much as possible so i dont see why there would be an imabalance.

this is actually really tough to admit. I really find it embarrassing that I have hip pains at my age. I know they eventually come to everyone but I feel like I'm the only kid now with some damn bad hips and it only happens when i deadlift.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 5:32 am 
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http://bretcontreras.com/an-interview-w ... c-cressey/

Read the first comment as that's the most important part.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 6:56 am 
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I've given up on the DL. My form sucks and it tears my body to pieces. I'm also the world's tallest midget. I've got short arms and legs and a long torso. I've said time and time again, and this time I mean it, I will never deadlift again other than at a meet. I'm 42 and no longer care that much about my totals. I have pride in my bench and in my squat. The DL can come along for the ride, but I'm not going to tear myself up for a number. I'll hit my 500 and walk away.

So... unless you are training for a PL meet, I see no reason why you should have to deadlift. I think if you can, it is a great lift. I'm not knocking the lift and have always said it is a superior lift. I'd recommend it to anyone. I just can't do it without hurting.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 7:02 am 
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I gave up on deads too. I always really liked the lift but I just have so much wrong with my posture and back that it's just not worth it. The slightest little breakdown in form leaves me crippled.

I could probably spend the next year of my life regressing the form, doing hour after hour of posture correction exercises, stretch this, activate that, but fv(k it. I'd rather just get in the gym and build some muscle.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 1:40 pm 
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I don't do it anymore either, at least not heavy. I have a family history of back problems. I think there is some sort of genetic weakness in the spine. I had an injury a few years ago, and after that it is very easy to injure it again.

I do actually do a high rep deadlift with light weight. It's not a strength exercise though. It's for back endurance and general functionality.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 3:03 pm 
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I deadlift heavy (conventional) about once a month. The rest of the time I do Good Mornings and Rack Pulls. It seems to be working, since my deadlift is improving.

@ hoosegow - Do you deadlift conventional or sumo?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2014 4:21 pm 
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Ironman wrote:
I do actually do a high rep deadlift with light weight. It's not a strength exercise though. It's for back endurance and general functionality.


Romanian deadlifts lend themselves quite well to that sort of thing. My flexibility is so shocking though it means the ROM is so small it hardly even seems worth it.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 1:20 am 
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I love deadlifting. I have quite long arms so the leverage is on my side. I have a strong grip and great mobility. Also my back can tolerate high loads even when slightly flexed and low back doesn't seem to mind. I deadlift twice a week these days and only if I go heavy on a single variation for weeks, it starts to wear me down. So I vary. I rotate different deadlifts in about 3-4 week cycles so I'm good.

Just wanted to be the guy who likes deadlifting and does it often. All kinds. Sumo, conventional, deficit, block, trap bar.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 3:57 am 
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Right now i'm deadlifting twice per week :headbang:

I've spent a lot of my deadlifting "career" pulling twice per week, too. Honestly, though, I don't know many people that train the deadlift like me. I don't mean in terms of frequency, but in terms of load used in training and technique.

My best deadlift last year was 530lbs in August. Since then, i've went up to or over 440lbs twice, once was an impromptu test day before xmas that I jumped in on and the next time was last week. Minus the test day, i've only just got back to 440 in training. The rest of the time, i've been working with 350-400, mostly.

So, i've barely went over 80% of my 1RM... 1RM meaning my dirty, belted, rounded back, do or die best.... Which is absolutely not what I want to base my training numbers on. This makes sense to most people, but hardly anyone can do it. My training goal is to get a nice looking and beltless 460, which I know will translate to an insane looking 550 (which I failed with at my knees in August).

It's far too easy to do wrong. Far too easy to go way too heavy. The majority of powerlifters I know don't think/care much about form.... Even when they're in pain.

Imagine your squat broke down to the extent that most "heavy" deadlifts do - you would get crushed. In deadlift it's too easy to just hang off the spine.

Not many people train variations either. Right now i'm doing RDL's one day, and sumo DL's the next. I hate them both. I can't lift as heavy, I struggle more with form..... Which is why I do them.

You should get as strong as you can with as light a weight as possible :wink:

KPj

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 4:09 am 
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For the OP - It would be interesting to see how you felt if you reduced all the squatting. Squatting is hip "stress", too. Deadlifting may just be the straw that breaks the camels back, total stress could be more like the issue.

Other than that, common causes are not locking the weight out with the hips/glutes, using the lower back to move. I like partial RDL's (to just below the knees) to train this, as well as hip thrusts (especially try single hip thrusts... and remember you should feel the glutes work - not hamstrings or lower back).

Also i've seen people with similar issues get a little "twist" on the pelvis on heavy reps and the bar drifts out on one side.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 6:16 am 
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KPj wrote:
Also i've seen people with similar issues get a little "twist" on the pelvis on heavy reps and the bar drifts out on one side.

I actually had this problem. I still have a little crooked posture and asymmetry, but most of the twisting and weight shifting went away after I started to do some Glute medius/TFL strengthening exercises every work out. It turned out I had trouble activating other one of my external rotators/adductors.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 8:18 am 
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Pfft, all this deadlift talk. I'm off to train my arms LIKE A REAL MAN


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 11:00 am 
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With KPj up above. I train deadlift at least once a week, quite often twice a week. And I only get close to my max maybe once a year (half a decade?). Of course I don't actually know what my true max is; as KPj puts it "my dirty, belted, rounded back, do or die best." I pulled 605 with no belt, good form and felt I had maybe 30-50lbs more, but I didn't go there. I most often work out in the 400-500 range with very occasional forays up to 550. Anything over 450 will also be a single.

Unless you're a powerlifter who is competing I don't see a real need to know what your "true" max is. Train with as light a weight as possible to still challenge yourself. If it doesn't feel right, lower the weight and concentrate on form until it does. For me it's keeping the bar as close to my body as possible. Damn thing keeps drifting forward. But when I get a clean pull up the shins and thighs... a weight that felt barely doable turns into an easy rep.

Also... maybe try snatch grip deadlift? It's my absolute favorite variation and it forces you to use both lower weight and good technique.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 12:18 pm 
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Deadlifts are my favorite exercise - and the doorway that led me from distance running to weight training.

Because I was tall and thin with long limbs (and no upper body strength), bench presses were never a good exercise for me. Squats were a problem, too. But an old-timer at my gym taught me how to deadlift - a somewhat controversial move back in the 1980s. I progressed pretty quickly with the exercise, and as my deadlift poundage went up, so did my poundage in the other exercises. If I hadn't learned to deadlift, I would have dropped weight training - my performance in the other exercises were that bad.


My best deadlift was 455# back in 2001, when I was 48. Since I'll be 61 in a couple of months, heavy lifting is out of the question now. But I still deadlift at least once a week. If done right, it's a good exercise for most people, and a great exercise for me.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 4:06 pm 
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It's really interesting... Ive actually ended up going separate ways with a training partner because we didn't really see eye to eye in this.... Was always a constant struggle between me insisting on better form with less weight, and her stubbornness to always want to lift more. Still very good friends, was all amicable and ended on a nice high note (getting 4 records in her last meet - squat, bench, deadlift, total - and highest female raw total in Scotland across all weight classes :smile: ).

I think it's more important for the deadlift than any other. I've been meaning to make a couple of videos, as I have loads of my training partners battle with the deadlift as well as mine. For him, he was stuck at 170kg (sorry can't be bothered converting to lbs)... For like, 18months Atleast. He dropped a lot of weight as well in that time so this played apart as well. I have videos of him struggling with 160-170, form breaking down and the bar drifting on one side constantly. Then various videos working on technique with 140-160 until he gets a solid but messy 180....also have a 195kg, and then a failed 200, glued to the floor. Same thing thereafter, only now he's working with 160-180 most of the time, until the latest one when he got 200x3, one of the cleanest triples with 200kg I've seen in person. I'm certain he has 220kg in him right now. It's not so much the weight, which is of course a lot, but the solid technique it's done with. He now fails with good form, amazing really, so I actually make him go heavier than planned quite a lot just now.

On the other hand, I've picked up some bad habits after doing a couple of meets last year. I even lost the ability to actually "feel" my back and hip position. I would start off rounded when I thought I was arched... I blame the belt, as I could only ever get it to feel good if i let myself "crunch" into it during the reps. My technique with 190-200kg got WORSE after increasing my absolute strength by 20kg (220-240). So whilst I got stronger, I also drastically widened the gap between my "technical" max and my absolute max.... And I have enough experience to know where this road heads (plateau, pain/injury), having had to learn the hard way before.

So I'm now back doing what my training partner was doing. Closing the gap between technical and absolute max. I have a video to mark the start of this, a belted 210kg. The weight flies up but my technique sucks. My training goal is to clean that up, then train for another meet.

When I really fight for technique with 190-200, it feels just about as difficult as 240...

Anyway, it's been a while since I've rambled....

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