Andy's Journal Comments

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Post by Jungledoc » Wed Dec 24, 2008 7:56 pm

Thanks, Peter! Merry Christmas to you. It's Christmas Day here now.


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Post by Jungledoc » Sun Jan 04, 2009 7:52 am

Here's my template for the next cycle (6 weeks):

Lower body
DL/Rack Pull
Back Squat
Bulgarian Split Squats

Push
Flat Bench
DB shoulder press

Pull
Wide-grip pronated pull-ups
DB one-arm row

Core
Extension Ab Braces (cable)
Pallof Press
Turkish Get-ups
Woodchops

Accessory
Cuban Rotations
External rotations
Lying fly
Lateral Raise

I'll continue doing one exercise from each category each day, for instance rack pulls are every third workout, and flat bench is every other workout. Also, I'm not as strict with the choice of core and accessory lifts, changing the order or subbing other lifts.

On the DL/rack pull, I'll continuing to increase the weight on the full range DLs and drop the rack pulls to 8 inches and then increase as I can.

On all lifts I'm going to lower volumes this time, doing a lot of the lifts 3 x 3 or 3 x 5. The core and accessory lifts are mostly 3 x 12. It's 5 exercises per workout, but with the lower number of sets, I'll try to shorten my time for the total workout.

I'm not unwilling to make changes during the cycle, so comments and suggestions are certainly welcome.

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Post by pdellorto » Sun Jan 04, 2009 10:03 am

Sounds good Doc. Looking forward to seeing how it works out.
Jungledoc wrote: Turkish Get-ups
Is this your first time with TGUs? I love them...such a simple yet challenging movement.

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Post by Jungledoc » Sun Jan 04, 2009 3:48 pm

Yeah. I've wanted to try them for a while. I've only done them BW, so I have no idea where to start on weight. Thought I'd just grab a DB and try it and see what happens.

Did you see that I broke a grip trying neutral-grip pull-ups? I think I'll put some heavy hooks in the ceiling to hang the grips properly by their steel D-rings and try again. After I sew the strap back together. Nylon suture should work.

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Post by pdellorto » Sun Jan 04, 2009 4:32 pm

Jungledoc wrote:Yeah. I've wanted to try them for a while. I've only done them BW, so I have no idea where to start on weight. Thought I'd just grab a DB and try it and see what happens.
Start light. I did my first ones with about 2-3kg in my hand, until I got the motion down. It gets hard fast.
Jungledoc wrote:Did you see that I broke a grip trying neutral-grip pull-ups? I think I'll put some heavy hooks in the ceiling to hang the grips properly by their steel D-rings and try again. After I sew the strap back together. Nylon suture should work.
I did. I chuckled over the "using a tool" comment. I can relate. The hooks should work, the D-rings are designed to support weight!


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Post by Jungledoc » Sun Jan 04, 2009 10:29 pm

One of the guys here has promised to teach me to weld. He's the project manager on our new hospital, and he has managed to scavenge 4 left-over 3" steel square posts. We're planning to use them to build the ultimate power rack. I'm planning the ultimate, adjustable, any-grip, any-width chinning bar as part of that. Maybe just daydream, cause he's really busy, and I can understand if he doesn't want to spend his rare leisure time teaching an old doctor to weld, but it would be fun.

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Post by pdellorto » Wed Jan 07, 2009 9:54 am

Ahem.
pdellorto wrote:Start light. I did my first ones with about 2-3kg in my hand, until I got the motion down. It gets hard fast.
So how were those 6kg TGUs again?

:roll:

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Post by Jungledoc » Wed Jan 07, 2009 4:52 pm

The first one was fine. :lol:

There some little pink DBs in the corner. Maybe I should use them next time.

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Post by pdellorto » Wed Jan 07, 2009 4:58 pm

Jungledoc wrote:The first one was fine. :lol:
I started with an empty dumbbell handle. And I'm sure glad I did.
Jungledoc wrote:There some little pink DBs in the corner. Maybe I should use them next time.
Unless you video it, we'll never know what color your foam-covered DBs are.

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Post by KPj » Tue Jan 20, 2009 5:17 am

Jungledoc wrote:Pallofs--This time I was careful to really lock out for a full second on each rep, and longer at the end of the set. This is lighter weight than I have used, but I felt that it was doing more. This is a great exercise--Why doesn't everybody do them?
I just wanted to quote this because it reflects my feelings exactly. I LOVE the Pallof Press. It's good as a hold as well, if you like doing holds. I much prefer doing reps, though.

I wanted to mention the WG pull ups - These put your upper arm/shoulder right in the impingement zone. It's the 'impinge' you'll feel. If you don't actually feel the 'ping', it may just feel sort of numb/weak, if not, painfull?

And are 'side raises' just the same thing as 'lateral raises? If so, try them with your arms out in front of you slightly, like this article, just before the summary at the end. in the article it's also done with a shrug, obviously you don't need to do it with the shrug. It's amazing the difference such a subtle change can make. And it will still get the job done just the same.

http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_art ... and_shrugs

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Post by Jungledoc » Tue Jan 20, 2009 7:55 am

Well, I'm not thinking it's impingement, as I feel it more distal in or under the anterior deltoid, along the bicipital tendon. It's not really painful, just a bit of a snapping bowstring effect.

Yeah, lateral raises. I do them with my arms forward. I have read this article, and I think that's where I read about this. It's a very good article, and I needed to read it again. It is also relevant to the push-up discussion thread.

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Post by KPj » Tue Jan 20, 2009 8:14 am

hmmm....

Well, if you're thinking bicipital tendon then the first thing that comes to mind is your DL's/Rack Pulls - just to say, make sure your arms are straight, or 'taut'. I know you'll know that anyway, but with all the other Cues that need remembering, it's easy to forget about that one.

With the side raises all else I would say is think about keeping your shoulder blades tight and see if it makes a difference. Keeping them down will technically give the upper arm more room to manoeuvre.

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Post by Proper Knob » Tue Jan 20, 2009 8:42 am

I've been reading Clinical Sports Medicine (as you do), and i came across this yesterday which is relevant to me and i'm guessing it could be relevant to you also. I'll quote it word for word.

'The long head of the biceps tendont hat passes from the superior lip of the glenoid through the bicipital groove in the humerus is susceptible to overuse injury. This occurs particulalry in athletes performing a large volume of weight training, such as BP and dips. This injury is not common but is often incorrectly diagnosed when, in fact, referred pain or rotator cuff tendinopathy are producing pain in the bicep region'.

Maybe that helps, maybe it doesn't, it helped me.

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Post by Jungledoc » Tue Jan 20, 2009 9:46 am

Thanks both of you.

The tendon isn't tender at all. There's no pain in this, as I would expect with tendonitis, and there is no trouble when I DL or rack pull.

I just discovered that I could reproduce this with the movement unweighted, and thus can palpate it with my other hand. (Brilliant that I didn't try this before.) It is, indeed close to the acromion. And it goes away when I am careful to keep my scapula back and down. KPj you're right.

I'm going to go back and re-read everything by Eric Creasey. Tomorrow. Good night.

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Post by KPj » Tue Jan 20, 2009 11:26 am

Ach, it's not much to worry about.

See, when I said 'impinge' or 'impingement zone', I didn't mean 'impingement syndrome'. It's actually quite a 'false' term.

Reading/re-reading Cresseys stuff is always a good idea.

One good place to start is the following newsletters. Here's a little snippet that might get you thinking. It gives you a new perspective on exercises that (arguably) unnecessarily put you in the impingment zone.

"Impingement is a physiological norm. Everyone – regardless of age, activity level, sport of choice, acromion type, gender, you name it – has it."

Impingement? yeah, no kidding...
http://ericcressey.com/newsletter130.html

And the second part,

Putting the Nail in the Impingement Coffin
http://ericcressey.com/newsletter131.html


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