Getting enough Fat

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daniel4738
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Getting enough Fat

Post by daniel4738 » Thu Aug 16, 2007 8:48 am

So, I have recently decided to try and cut out dairy products like milk, natural yogurt, cheese etc from my diet on the advice of my doctor.

The last few days, my diet has been about 25% protein, 25% fat and 50% carbs. But only at 2800 Kcal (which is probably not enough for me). (about 180g protein.

The problem is that I am quite poor, I am a phd student and my weekly food budget is about 50 euros (2 chicken breasts costs 5euros, can of tuna 1euro, 1ltr milk 1euro), and is about adequate to eat about 180g of protein and most of the carbs comming from veggies.

Does anyone have any good suggestions for getting that fat level up. Nuts are quite expensive (2-3euros for 200g) and I just can't afford to supliment my diet with lots of nuts.

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Post by TimD » Thu Aug 16, 2007 9:22 am

I don't know how much olive oil costs where you are, but a little goes a long way. Drizzle your meat and veg w/ some after cooking.
I do it all the time, mainly for taste. Olive oil and herbs seem to perk up even the most mundane veg.
Tim

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Post by stuward » Thu Aug 16, 2007 9:42 am

Flax seed meal is fairly inexpensive. $4 per lb here. I add it to my oatmeal. It's a good source of good fat. You can check the baking or bulk sections of your stores for nuts. Sometimes walnuts are reasonably priced. If you can't find anything better, peanuts aren't bad but they have no Omega 3.

Canola oil has some good fats and is usually fairly cheap. It's not as good as olive oil but a lot cheaper.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canola#Health_effects

Avocados are good too.

There are 2 types of safflower oil. One high in monounsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid) and the other high in polyunsaturated fatty acid (linoleic acid). You want the former.

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Post by Ironman » Thu Aug 16, 2007 12:53 pm

Beef, cheese and nuts maybe?

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Post by TimD » Thu Aug 16, 2007 2:54 pm

He said he is on a tight budget (beef, nuts) and dropped dairy (cheese). Good try anyway. I know the beef thing isn't hard to get cost effectively here in the US, our local supermarket regularly runs certain cuts on sale; I just came home with a five lb tray of ground beef chuck for a buck 50 / lb (weekly special) and at the local Costco and Sam's you can buy 6 lb trays of the 90 per cent stuff for about 2.40 ' lb. Also, I don't know about Europe, but here in the SE US, I can buy a 10 lb bag of chicken legs for 5 bucks. Yeah, chicken breast is good for stir fry's , but for just throwing something on the Barbey, hey, those cheap legs are GOOOOD and cheap in comparison to most other things. Your probably thinking, what am I going to do with that much? Simply, wrap them up, put them in a freezer tight zip-lock, throw them in the freezer. You can also cook them up, then keep a few days worth in the fridge, freeze the rest.
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Post by Dave X » Thu Aug 16, 2007 6:53 pm

I dunno how expensive it is but things like sausage or pepperoni isn't that expensive where I live and it has tons of fat and protein, and no carbs.

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Post by daniel4738 » Fri Aug 17, 2007 3:04 am

Thanks for the suggestions, I'm not on *that* tight a budget, my main hobby is physical training so I think it's worth spending a bit more to get the right foods, but I do need to be careful. The problem is there are no 'cheap and nasty' places to buy food so it's all good quality but relatively expensive.

Olive oil is a good one, I do eat ground (minced) beef fairly often but it's like €4 for 500g here. I guess I should try and find a 'health food store' which has lots of nuts and stuff in.

The good thing about here is that i'm close to Italy so good red wine is pretty cheap (almost as cheap as 2 chicken breasts).

The other thing is I don't have a freezer :)

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lactose free!

Post by nicolecarter'sfunfitness » Fri Aug 17, 2007 7:26 am

Hi!
I had to cut out dairy products for a few years on the advice of my doctor too and eventually found it quite easy. I prefer rice milk to soya although apparantly there's more protein in soya milk, theres lots of alternatives to dairy products out there especially in big supermarkets and health food shops. it's amazing what tofu and soya can be turned into. there is a nice cream chees called tofutti which i hope you can get where you are. it has no cholesterol but no fat either. good comments from the rest of the guys about oils and stuff, nuts and seeds are quite important so try compromising on the wine budget!

i suppose what you have to watch out for is your calcium levels dropping but there are vegan rice and soya milks you can get with non-lactose calcium and other vitamins in them. this is important if you are cutting out dairy products to get the vitamins from other things in your diet

here is a good link

http://www.thisiscool.com/mohan/nondairy.html

let me know how it goes!!

nicole :0)




daniel4738 wrote:Thanks for the suggestions, I'm not on *that* tight a budget, my main hobby is physical training so I think it's worth spending a bit more to get the right foods, but I do need to be careful. The problem is there are no 'cheap and nasty' places to buy food so it's all good quality but relatively expensive.

Olive oil is a good one, I do eat ground (minced) beef fairly often but it's like €4 for 500g here. I guess I should try and find a 'health food store' which has lots of nuts and stuff in.

The good thing about here is that i'm close to Italy so good red wine is pretty cheap (almost as cheap as 2 chicken breasts).

The other thing is I don't have a freezer :)

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Post by stuward » Fri Aug 17, 2007 7:47 am

Calcium levels are more affected by your acid/akiline balance than dairy intake. If you get enough green veg, don't worry about calcium.

Soy can stimulate estrogen production, not something you want. The way Aisians eat soy is fermented, not as a meat/dairy substitute. Fermented soy does not have any negative aspects when eaten in normal qtys.

I've actually done the calculations myself. You can completely eliminate dairy, grains and processed foods from your diet and still get all the nutrients you need without resorting to supplements and soy substitutes, just eating a variety of normal vegetables, fruits, berries, meat, nuts, oils and herbs. It's the way our ancestors ate and it still works.

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Post by strathmeyer » Fri Aug 17, 2007 1:32 pm

High cocoa chocolate?

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Post by daniel4738 » Sat Aug 18, 2007 9:17 am

stuward wrote:Calcium levels are more affected by your acid/akiline balance than dairy intake. If you get enough green veg, don't worry about calcium.

Soy can stimulate estrogen production, not something you want. The way Aisians eat soy is fermented, not as a meat/dairy substitute. Fermented soy does not have any negative aspects when eaten in normal qtys.

I've actually done the calculations myself. You can completely eliminate dairy, grains and processed foods from your diet and still get all the nutrients you need without resorting to supplements and soy substitutes, just eating a variety of normal vegetables, fruits, berries, meat, nuts, oils and herbs. It's the way our ancestors ate and it still works.
OK sounds good. I tend to eat about 500g of frozen veggies a day anyway, calcium was one thing I was worried about but it looks like i shouldn't worry.

On the subject of veggies ... I don't know how but after 500g you are stuffed but still feal hungry having only consumed about 150kcal.

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Post by stuward » Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:49 pm

Adding some fat to your veg should make you less hungry.

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Post by daniel4738 » Mon Aug 20, 2007 2:36 am

I added some olive oil to my veggies over the weekend, seemed to work OK, thanks for the suggestions :)

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