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Full fat yogurt vs fat free yougurt

Posted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 9:53 pm
by dang.27
Hi, my question is very simple. I have heard mixed opinions on this so I want to have this clarified.

Which one is better, full fat yogurt or fat free yogurt?

Some say full fat is good because it has good fat. Others say it is bad because it is fatty.

Some say fat free is good because there's less fat and you're mainly consuming the calcium and nutrients. Others say it is bad because it contains other ingredients that are harmful.

You can see how I can be thoroughly confused.

Posted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 10:03 pm
by pdellorto
Fat isn't inherently harmful. Full fat yogurt is better than no-fat yogurt because they make up with it with lots of sugars basically.

I'm not sure about full-fat yogurt vs. 2% or skimmed natural yogurt, though. The ones I've seen of those are just lower fat, not pumped fill of crud to make them taste better.

How much fat you want to consume depends on your diet. If you're going low-carb, go for full-fat yogurt. If you're balancing out your carbs, fats, and proteins in some manner like the zone, maybe a lower-fat yogurt would be fine. But stick to natural stuff - Trader Joe's carries stuff like Fage Total yogurt, which has a low-fat and skimmed (no fat) yogurt that doesn't contain many extra carbs...it's just made with less fat in the mix. Most store-bought yogurts aren't like that.

http://www.fage.gr/page/default.asp?id=413&la=2

I think the downside to yogurt is it is apparently a high insulin index food - spikes your insulin. On that theory I stick it in my post-workout drink sometimes.

Hope that helps,

Peter

Posted: Thu May 01, 2008 7:05 am
by TimD
Doc Sears in his "Zone" recommends plain yogurt for snacks (no added sugars, flavors) either full fat or the 2% stuff. Again, do NOT be afraid of the fat, be afraid of all that high fructose corn syrup they pump into the stuff. Plain yogurt goes well with some fresh fruit pumped into it, and it also makes a nice Tzatziki spread.
Tim

Posted: Thu May 01, 2008 7:08 am
by stuward
Most yogurt is full of sugar. If you look at an 8 ft section in most grocery store, all but about 12" of shelf space is filled with sugar laden crap mixed with what looks like fruit. They will have brightly colored attractive packaging and seem to promote a healthy lifestyle. Their advertising will feature slim girls in tights and carry promises of fitness and bodily perfection.

This is marketing bull$h1t.

That 12" section of shelf will be the plain yogurt, usually with wording like "Balkan style" and is the only healthy product in the section.

Once you get it home, add fruit is you want. Mix flax seed in. Add it to your smoothies and protein drinks.

How much fat it has is not important. It's how much added sugar that's in it. Marketers don't want you to know about the sugar. That's what makes it taste good and tasting good sells more product and makes more MONEY.

Stu's rant for the day is over.

Posted: Thu May 01, 2008 7:13 am
by TimD
Stu, looks like we ranted on top of each other, but you're was a bit stronger. Same idea though, plain.
Tim

Posted: Thu May 01, 2008 7:26 am
by stuward
I used to be in the grocery business and I'm hypersensitive to manipulative marketing. Recently, food manufacturers are pushing stuff as healthy but it's the same old manufactured crap that they have always sold.

Actually the best yogurt I've had was made by my wife's cousin in law who uses the same starter batch of yogurt that has been handed down through her family for generations and she brought over from India.

Posted: Thu May 01, 2008 8:02 am
by TimD
I happen to love yogurt, the plain stuff. I'm not sure what you call "Balkan" style, but my guess is it's the same stuff we call "Greek style" here. Very thick, almost a soft cheese consistency. I usually have to make mine. I take a quart of the regular Dannon or whatever brand, line a collander with cheesecloth , place over a deep pot, and dump in the yogurt. Cover and let sit overnight, and all the liquid drains out. From there I make the spreads, adding garlic, lemon juice, coarse chopped garlic, cilantro and mint. Goes great with anytype of grilled/roasted meat, chicken or fish. Great just as a spread or on salads.
Tim

Posted: Thu May 01, 2008 8:50 am
by pdellorto
Lucky for me there is a lot of good natural yogurt here. Sugar-free, active cultures, full-fat. Still not as good as the Fage Total stuff I linked to, though. That stuff takes like soft cheese more than yogurt. Sooooo good.

Peter

Posted: Thu May 01, 2008 9:54 am
by TimD
I like watching Alton Brown's "Good Eats" on the Food Network, where he comes up with historical this and that's about foods, and he says Yogurt and cottage cheese the original cheeses.
Tim

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 11:46 pm
by Porovoz
Personally, I am very big on fat free yogurt and consume 1-2 large containers daily. If you can handle the lactose, it is insanely good for digestive health, and one of my favourite foods in terms of taste. Why fat free though, you ask? As with all milk product, the bulk of the fat in yogurt is saturated fat - and I already get plenty of that from all the meat I eat to fulfil my protein requirements. But yes, plain or something fruity but Splenda sweetened is the way to go.

Posted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 3:54 am
by Ironman
fat schmat. Contrary to popular belief ( which is based on ridiculous unproven hypotheses, with tons of contrary evidence), saturated fat is good for you. Ancel Keys employed cherry picking and confused relation with causation. Total junk science. Sugar on the other hand is not good and most yogurt has it, especially the fat free. It is best to get the kind without any added sugar.

Posted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 7:29 am
by Porovoz
It's hard to go against the medical community when there is no definitive answer. Every government agency that has any authority on the matter and most reputable dietary guides seem to be against high saturated fat intake. Cardiovascular disease? Worse serum cholesterol profiles? Cancer? Until there is some concrete consensus - I personally think it a good idea to eat a balanced diet, vary intake of different fats in accordance to some widely approved guideline, and not make myself the guinea pig that sets out to prove the one can eat unlimited amounts of grease, or die trying. :green:

Posted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 7:35 am
by ironmaiden708
Porovoz wrote:It's hard to go against the medical community when there is no definitive answer. Every government agency that has any authority on the matter and most reputable dietary guides seem to be against high saturated fat intake. Cardiovascular disease? Worse serum cholesterol profiles? Cancer? Until there is some concrete consensus - I personally think it a good idea to eat a balanced diet, vary intake of different fats in accordance to some widely approved guideline, and not make myself the guinea pig that sets out to prove the one can eat unlimited amounts of grease, or die trying. :green:
The widely approved guideline you would be talking about recommends people take in about 1.7g of omega-3 per day.

Posted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 8:00 am
by Porovoz
ironmaiden708 wrote: The widely approved guideline you would be talking about recommends people take in about 1.7g of omega-3 per day.
Uhm, I'm not entirely sure how this tangent relates to the discussion of saturated fat in yogurt which has little to do with omega-3, but whose recommendation are you referring to? This is what I found:
Many major health organizations across the world have issued recommendations as to the amount of Omega-3 EPA/DHA that should be consumed daily. While they all agree that EPA and DHA are important to overall health, the exact amount recommended varies by organization. The International Society for the Study of Fatty Acids & Lipids (ISSFAL), for example, suggests 500 mg of EPA/DHA for adults per day, which is similar to the recommendations of the National Institutes of Health of the United States (650 mg EPA/DHA per day), and The National Health & Medical Research Council of Australia (610 mg for men and 430 mg for women).
http://www.meg-3.com/about/FAQ.php

Posted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 9:41 am
by ironmaiden708
Porovoz wrote:
ironmaiden708 wrote: The widely approved guideline you would be talking about recommends people take in about 1.7g of omega-3 per day.
Uhm, I'm not entirely sure how this tangent relates to the discussion of saturated fat in yogurt which has little to do with omega-3, but whose recommendation are you referring to? This is what I found:
Many major health organizations across the world have issued recommendations as to the amount of Omega-3 EPA/DHA that should be consumed daily. While they all agree that EPA and DHA are important to overall health, the exact amount recommended varies by organization. The International Society for the Study of Fatty Acids & Lipids (ISSFAL), for example, suggests 500 mg of EPA/DHA for adults per day, which is similar to the recommendations of the National Institutes of Health of the United States (650 mg EPA/DHA per day), and The National Health & Medical Research Council of Australia (610 mg for men and 430 mg for women).
http://www.meg-3.com/about/FAQ.php
My point was referring to your statement:
vary intake of different fats in accordance to some widely approved guideline
Well the guidelines that I displayed are telling you out of the 75g of fat per day they recommend, you only need 1.6g (sorry off by .1g) to be from omega-3 which is wayyy below the amounts that any of us recommend or the amounts people eat on a daily basis in other cultures.

That's your credible source? Wow, just awesome. A website selling an omega-3 product. I'm pulling my information from a book called "Contemporary Nutrition: A Functional Approach."