Page 1 of 1

Iron Cookware

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 12:16 am
by tyler
I am going to start up my jogging again, and the last time I was jogging pretty hardcore I became iron deficient. With that in mind, I have decided to adjust my diet accordingly, with higher iron content foods and watching out for some that will block iron absorption. I have decided to go out and buy some iron cookware, for I have read that it will increase the amount of iron in foods like rice and stew cooked in it. Now here's my problem- I can't seem to find cookware at the store that isn't either aluminum or some weird space age material! Anyone know where I can buy some iron pots and pans?

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 6:25 am
by hoosegow
I'm not sure I buy into your theory since cast iron cook ware gets a coating of carbon on it, but...

If you have a Cabela's or Bass Pro Shop near by, they have them. Academy does as well. I think pretty much any place that sells camping supplies will have them.

I like cooking on my old cast iron stuff. It is better than teflon.

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 12:33 pm
by stuward
Cast iron pans should be available just about everywhere. I use a Wagner's 1891 pan. Keep it seasoned and it will last forever. I find it the most useful pan we have. If you can find an old one at an estate sale, clean it up and season it. The older ones can be quite valuable.

I find it hard to imagine that a man that eats meat would be iron deficient. If you are not a man that eats meat you could be, but if you are check with your doctor.

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 2:05 pm
by TimD
I've found cast iron in most good stores, including K and Wal marts. I consider them a staple, but don't know about them adding anyiron content.
Tim

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 11:47 pm
by tyler
Well...it was when I was running very, very hardcore distances, not running like a mile or two. Like averaging around 8 or 9 at least 4 times a week. I think it was probably because I used to also be a coffee and caffeine fiend...and I know this blocks iron absorption. So I just want to be extra sure this time. I just want to add iron bit by bit without consuming steak everyday (as I don't particularly like red meat and its expensive). But...I have read from numerous sources that iron absorption is increased cooking with iron cookware, especially highly acidic foods like tomato sauce. A sample website I read at on it (and I'm not saying this is the only one I know of, just one I have programmed into my favorites for future use) is http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes ... okery.html . But I have read in on several other web sources and books about this and while I don't know the extent of the truth of the claim, there must be some sort of validity behind it because practically everywhere I've looked on the subject has confirmed it.

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2008 11:48 pm
by tyler
Oh yea...and thanks for the suggestions...I will look at a walmart (looked at some other grocery stores with no results!)

Posted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:13 pm
by TeeBee
I think I read somewhere that the iron from a frying pan can't be absorbed by the body. Anyway, my Wagner pan is still going strong (my grandmother handed it down to me). Go online to find out the directions for its care and it'll give you yeoman's service.

Posted: Wed Aug 06, 2008 4:46 pm
by bob
My nutrition teacher was discussing a few weeks ago about iron cookware. She said the iron can leach out of the pot/pan and become part of the food.

Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2008 10:31 pm
by tyler
On a different iron note...the other day I bought shrimp from the store and it said it had a 20 % iron content...then just yesterday when grocery shopping I looked at a bag of shrimp in a different store and it said it only had 2%...the only difference being one was shelled and the other was not...isn't it kind of dumb to put the contents of a shell on the nutrition label? I mean that's like labelling the sunflower seed shell or the bone inside the chicken...

Posted: Sat Aug 16, 2008 1:30 am
by Jungledoc
Which one was shelled?

Posted: Sat Aug 16, 2008 10:44 am
by tyler
The one that had 20% of daily value

Posted: Sat Aug 16, 2008 11:03 am
by Stephen Johnson
tyler wrote:On a different iron note...the other day I bought shrimp from the store and it said it had a 20 % iron content...then just yesterday when grocery shopping I looked at a bag of shrimp in a different store and it said it only had 2%...the only difference being one was shelled and the other was not...isn't it kind of dumb to put the contents of a shell on the nutrition label? ..
It might have been a typo - according to this, a 4 oz (113 g) serving of shrimp contains 19.4% of the RDA for iron:
Shrimp is an excellent source of protein and selenium. It is also a very good source of vitamin D, vitamin B12 and a good source of iron, phosphorus, omega-3 fatty acids, niacin, zinc, copper and magnesium.
Most shrimp is farmed raised, though. I wonder if the nutritional content of farmed shrimp varies from wild shrimp.

Posted: Sun Aug 17, 2008 11:30 pm
by tyler
You're probaably right about the farm raised shrimp...they probably aren't eating what they normally would in the wild.

Ohhh...here's another link on the iron cooking-

http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/2378.html