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Posted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 5:16 pm
by pdellorto
daniel4738 wrote:This is from the top of my head, but I will check with the book at home this evening.
I'd like to see it. I read that book - by Loren Cordain and Joe Friel, IIRC. It's good, but I really felt like it was so closely aimed at endurance athletes that I couldn't make it work for me. My needs aren't for races, but for short fights that start at hard-to-determine times (when the queue of fights ahead of you ends, which can be long or short), and for anaerobic workouts.

Also, I hate to mix up fruit juice. I prefer my honey+water mix. But I'd still like to see the full recommendation if you've got it. The more options I have besides HFCS-laden artificially-colored crap, the better.

Posted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 7:24 am
by daniel4738
pdellorto wrote:
daniel4738 wrote:This is from the top of my head, but I will check with the book at home this evening.
I'd like to see it. I read that book - by Loren Cordain and Joe Friel, IIRC. It's good, but I really felt like it was so closely aimed at endurance athletes that I couldn't make it work for me. My needs aren't for races, but for short fights that start at hard-to-determine times (when the queue of fights ahead of you ends, which can be long or short), and for anaerobic workouts.

Also, I hate to mix up fruit juice. I prefer my honey+water mix. But I'd still like to see the full recommendation if you've got it. The more options I have besides HFCS-laden artificially-colored crap, the better.
So i think your situation makes it a little more complicated. That is for events lasting less than 90 minutes at an endurance pace the suggestion is that water is the main nutritional requirement, about 500ml per hour.

I would have put your problem, more into pre-exercise nutrition. If your fights work similar to the way the way my kickboxing fights would work you can spend 4 hours sitting around and fight x times randomly in that period. I know how you feel when you get in the ring, the spotlights are beating down on you and you feel your stomach growl out of hunger and your arms hang slightly numb etc.

Having read through the suggestions for pre-exercise nutrition, the author suggests that if sugar is being ingested, it needs to be metabolized by your body using it, otherwise it will go into a post-sugar crashing phase where you have less energy.

Something I read somewhere else however, suggests (for morning training) that consuming 100-200 kcal (1-2 energy gels+water) 10 mins prior to starting an event will mean you start in the middle of a spike, giving you an extra boost to hit the start of the pack (endurance events) meaning you just have to keep your pace with your aerobic system.

What this could mean for you, is that doing something similar between 10 and 0 minutes before a fight will put you into a 'high' just as you start.

You then ingest the post fight sugar from a standard recovery style drink to replenish the lost glycogen (and maybe some creatine for the ATP-CP energy system). Your stores are replenished for the next fight where you rinse and repeat.

The 'recovery' drink for a 180lb person would be: 20oz Fruit juice, 5 TBSP glucose powder, 3TBSP of protein powder. Including a piece of fruit and 3 pinches of table salt. He suggests that most fruit/juice contains enough of the other electrolytes to combat any imbalance which shouldn't be there unless you have been exercising for over 18 hours.

If I were in your position, I would consider the 1-2 energy gels (or 200kcal of glucose in some water) 10 mins before a fight, then a peice of fruit (low fibre like banana) and a 5:1 glucose-protein mix, sipped directly after until the next one. 5:3 as suggested might prevent gastric emptying.

Though I am no expert, it would just be something I would try. Yours is a very interesting nutritional problem though :)