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Milk...the other protein shake.

Posted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 12:22 am
by dyecal
While browsing your forum, I came across some info stating that drinking chocolate milk post workout is REALLY good for you. And I'm just curious if chocolate milk can replace these other protein shakes for ones diet. Say like you did....banana+peanut butter+chocolate instant carnation+milk...would that be as beneficial as any other protein shake?

Also...is there a certain fat content of milk that is the generally the best to drink?

Thanks! :)

Posted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 12:30 am
by ironmaiden708
While browsing your forum, I came across some info stating that drinking chocolate milk post workout is REALLY good for you. And I'm just curious if chocolate milk can replace these other protein shakes for ones diet. Say like you did....banana+peanut butter+chocolate instant carnation+milk...would that be as beneficial as any other protein shake?

Also...is there a certain fat content of milk that is the generally the best to drink?
Did you use the search function to find that info about choco milk?

That would be fine, don't go nuts with the peanut butter and u'll be golden. Milk can replace other protein sources but it can get expensive after a while. If you are trying to drop weight then milk wouldn't be a good choice. Fat content shouldn't bother yo all too much. After a workout you will want low fat content so the protein can get into the blood asap. At other times of the day that would be fine.

Posted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 1:10 am
by dyecal
Nah, I was just reading through all the threads on this board and finally ran into it on page 3 :). And then spent like 30 more min researching it on google hehe.

Awesome, I'll trying them this week and go from there :D.

Also, from spending over an hour now reading this forum it seems you know quite a bit...so I am curious if you know of any really good websites I should look at in regards to dieting and nutrition (I Just started reading exrx's page on it and so far it seems to be full of good information). Also, I'm around 135 lbs and am trying to put on weight, and it seems all the diet info I come across is geared more towards people who want to lose weight. Which kind of makes it confusing...I mean, am I supposed to eat less still to not increase my body fat and just keep lifting weights? I don't see how eating more would increase my muscle mass...

Any and all help is really appreciated :D

Posted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 6:07 am
by stuward
Depending on your age and how easy it is to gain fat for you, fat gain may not be an issue. Milk is a good option for bulking and in some places is cheaper than whey. If fat gain is an issue, the sugars in milk will be a problem. Whey has the sugar removed so it's better in that regard. Read all the stickies in the diet section of this forum. There are good links there. Keep in mind that nutrition requirements for a 16 year old trying to gain weight are vastly different than for a middle aged person prone to gaining fat.

Posted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 8:39 am
by ironmaiden708
Nah, I was just reading through all the threads on this board and finally ran into it on page 3 :). And then spent like 30 more min researching it on google hehe.

Awesome, I'll trying them this week and go from there :D.

Also, from spending over an hour now reading this forum it seems you know quite a bit...so I am curious if you know of any really good websites I should look at in regards to dieting and nutrition (I Just started reading exrx's page on it and so far it seems to be full of good information). Also, I'm around 135 lbs and am trying to put on weight, and it seems all the diet info I come across is geared more towards people who want to lose weight. Which kind of makes it confusing...I mean, am I supposed to eat less still to not increase my body fat and just keep lifting weights? I don't see how eating more would increase my muscle mass...
Bulking is pretty simple. Eat high energy, high protein, and highly nutritious foods. You can get more complicated, if you are prone to putting on fat easily then low GI carbs would be a wise choice and have to calculate the amount of calories you want to ingest in a day from protein carbs fats. If you don't have that problem then you can go crazy with the foods you are eating still making sure you are getting plenty of protein and eating high nutrition foods.

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 9:20 am
by dyecal
high energy, high protein, and high nutritious foods, got it :D. Hopefully I can get at least half a weeks diet plan done sometime today.

Also, this meat debate. I keep hearing meat is bad for you, meat is good for you, you should only eat poultry, lean beef is fine, etc etc...

...What do most nutritionists agree on? I really can't find the answer =\

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 9:47 am
by hoosegow
The right kind of meat is great for you. In fact I just read an article that said grass fed beef is almost as good as fish. I am lucky. I killed two deer this year so I am currently well stocked in highly nutritous hormone and drug free protein. One of the things I've recently started doing is trying to eat only what I kill. So this year I am going to try and eat a lot of wild hog as they are plentiful around here. I also have a good butcher in the area. I am going to see if he can get sell me a side of free range beef. If he can't, I'll buy a calf off of my father in law and take it to slaughter.

In reality, just be cautious of store bought, high fat meat. If you have to buy from the store, my opinion (just my opinion), the order of preference is:
Fish
Skinless poultry
Lean beef
Lean pork
beef
pork
processed meats (sausage, balony, spam, etc)

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 11:37 am
by stuward
Hooseqow is right but I want to point out, fish is not all the same, just as meat is not all the same. You will alway be better of with wild vs farmed. Wild salmon is probably the best fish, farmed catfish probably the worst. Poultry should be free range.

With beef, beware of grass-fed and grain finished. You want beef that have never eaten grain. 3 months of grain finishing will remove any benefit from being grass fed but the farmer can still use the term. They will grain finish because it adds a lot of weight just before slaughtering. Small farmer's I've talked to say they are as well of without grain finishing because what they lose in weight, they make up in lower costs and the consumer gets a better product. For big farmers the economics are different. Therefore, always buy from a small farmer you trust rather than a grocery store.

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 2:19 pm
by dyecal
Awesome, thanks for the list, hoosegow!

And thanks for that information on big farmers using grain in their diet, stuward...I never would have even thought about the difference between how small farmers raise their product vs big farmers...even though I should have lol.

Also, I'm just gonna throw this out there...
How does intaking more calories gain muscle weight? Eating fatty foods would yield in more body fat, but I thought the only way you can increase muscle mass is through the tearing and rebuilding of them. =X

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 2:42 pm
by pdellorto
Eating more adds more muscle this way:

Step 1: Go lift weights, preferably heavy weights in compound exercises (squats, deadlifts, bench presses, chinups...etc.)

Step 2: Go eat food. Eat more calories than you need just for replenishing your body's expenditure from the workout.

Step 3: Get good sleep and real rest.

Repeat after about 2 days of rest.

The "Starting Strength" workout is based on this - squat + 2 other exercises Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, eat a lot of food, sleep a lot, and GOMAD - Gallon Of (Whole) Milk A Day.

If you can digest the milk, or take enough lactase enzyme to do it, I'd say try it. I found my body can't tolerate that much dairy, in fact it works better entirely without dairy. But GOMAD, post-workout chocolate milk, and lots of food, combined with heavy lifting, has worked for many people for a long, long time.

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 3:08 pm
by dyecal
I understand the process of exercising, but could you explain how intaking more calories (besides protein) actually increases body/muscle weight?

Also on that list, sleep is probably the hardest one. I hate sleeping, and being a college student, its hard to goto bed early as well lol.

That's the first time I've heard of the 'GOMAD' thing. I'll definitely have to check into that :D

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:06 pm
by TimD
More calories equates to more energy for work, and also provides the necessary macronutrients for growth. To exceed the status quo of your weight, you need to exceed the amount of calories you intake to maintain your current weight.

The hard , heavy work (which requires energy) provides a stimulus for growth, and the extra calories you ingest allow that growth to occur.
Tim

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:09 pm
by dyecal
Hmm ok I think I understand it now :)

Also, the Starting Strength workout, pdellorto, looks very appealing. Has anyone else tried this before? Or have any comments about it? :)

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:31 pm
by wilburburns
dyecal wrote:Hmm ok I think I understand it now :)

Also, the Starting Strength workout, pdellorto, looks very appealing. Has anyone else tried this before? Or have any comments about it? :)
I am currently doing the SS Workout.

However, I'm not doing GOMAD or even eating as well as I should.

Cliff

Posted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:45 pm
by wilburburns
More Starting Strength Info..

The Book Written By Mark RippeToe and Lon Kilgore
http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Strength ... gy_b_img_b

Wikia Page - Not Written by Any of the Book Writers..
http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/ ... ength_Wiki

Great Collection of Videos by Mark Rippetoe regarding each of the SS Basic Lifts..
http://www.youtube.com/user/timdonahey

Cliff