Low carb, getting enough energy and fats.

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daniel4738
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Low carb, getting enough energy and fats.

Post by daniel4738 » Wed Jan 21, 2009 8:50 am

As a bit of an experiment, in conjunction with my training schedule I have been eating a very strict paleo diet.

The problem is getting enough calories. I need enough calories to do the work I need, then recover for either an second workout in the evening, and future recoverys.

I have been pseudo counting my calories for the last couple of weeks and my meal plan generally looks like:

Meal 1: 0600.
3 Eggs, 2 peices of fruit.

Meal 1b: 0900(only on workout days)
40g 80% Protein powder, + 40g Glucose powder.

Meal 2: 1100.
Large Handfull of nuts, peice of fruit.

Meal 3: 1230-1300
Meat and vegetables (tuna salad, last nights 2/3 chicken breast+veg)

Meal 4: 1600
Meat and vegetables (tuna salad, last nights 2/3 chicken breast+veg)

Meal 5: 1900-2000 (dinner)
Meat and vegetables (tuna salad, last nights 2/3 chicken breast+veg)

Meal 6 2200 (sometimes)
Handfull of nuts, berries, peice of fruit etc.

Obviously there is some supplimetnation with cod liver oil, flax seed oil etc. I also try to snack on nuts whenever I feel a little bored/hungry. Oil in cooking etc (olive oil, rapeseed oil).


BW = 72kg.
Caloric intake ~3000kcal
200-220g Protein
25%Protein
60%Fat
15% Carb.

My question is whether I should be eating the fats or carbs. I need the energy, but should I just stick to this OR replace the nuts with dried fruit to up the carb calories.

Is 60% of 3000 calories from fat too much?

Another question, rapeseed oil or Canola oil? I know they are almost the same thing, but is the rapeseed worse (it's damned cheap).

Cheers.

hoosegow
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Post by hoosegow » Wed Jan 21, 2009 10:15 am

60% from fat is too much. There are tons of ratios out there, but, if I remember correctly, a 40-40-20 should be adequate. At least you seem to be eating the good fats, though.

A couple of things I'd recommend. Up your carbs right before and after your training. That way you have plenty of energy to do the work and you have energy to recover. Also, try to choke down another protein shake instead of eating the fat.

I'm like you when it comes to calories when I am trying to watch what I eat. I actually struggle to consume enough calories when eating correctly. I get sick of eating. It works, though. Everytime I use the rule, eat only what I can kill or grow (with the exception of protein powder), I lose weight and I don't think I lose muscle. In fact, I'm doing that right now, just not being extremely strict on it.

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Ironman
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Post by Ironman » Thu Jan 22, 2009 4:21 am

It's not too much. Fat doesn't really matter. It depends on what you are trying to do though.

daniel4738
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Post by daniel4738 » Thu Jan 22, 2009 11:21 am

Ironman wrote:It's not too much. Fat doesn't really matter. It depends on what you are trying to do though.
My principal aim is to fund the energy deficit I am creating by doing long (>90min) endurance sessions and the intense glycogen depleting strength training sessions (<60s rest between sets, complex).

Of course it would be very nice to build a little muscle and/or burn a little fat.

Am I predisposed to burn a little muscle by including 2-3 90min+ endurance sessions per week?

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Post by stuward » Thu Jan 22, 2009 12:57 pm

I remember reading about one long distance endurance athelete that trained himself to burn fat for energy by eating a high fat diet. If I ever finf the article, I'll post it. This works very well for long slow events. You don't need to keep glycogen levels up by taking in carbs every hour. You need some time to transition, perhaps 3-4 weeks.

daniel4738
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Post by daniel4738 » Thu Jan 22, 2009 1:48 pm

stuward wrote:I remember reading about one long distance endurance athelete that trained himself to burn fat for energy by eating a high fat diet. If I ever finf the article, I'll post it. This works very well for long slow events. You don't need to keep glycogen levels up by taking in carbs every hour. You need some time to transition, perhaps 3-4 weeks.
Stu,
I have read similar articles. I even read one which suggested taking a shot of olive oil after about 3-4 hours in endurance events to encourage the body to use fat.

It is also one of the principals behind the training. The morning session depletes the glycogen stores and the body then spends the rest of the day burning fat to replenish them, only to be hit my an endurance session in the evening with low glycogen, which should transition the body into the aerobic/fat burning phase.

Lets see if it works.

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Post by stuward » Fri Jan 23, 2009 12:03 am

Here's a sample diet that is very similar to yours: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-b ... mple-menu/

The fat % works out to 60%.

Canola is bio-engineered rapeseed oil. The original rapeseed can be toxic. I'd stay away from it. http://www.soyatech.com/rapeseed_facts.htm

Olive, palm and coconut oil and animal fats are a better choices than canola.

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