A question about some vegetable proteins...

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Rucifer
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A question about some vegetable proteins...

Post by Rucifer » Tue Feb 03, 2009 11:13 am

I eat a lot of canned spinach, and notice from brand to brand how the quality seems to differ as far as nutrients. LOL. Especially the protein. Sometimes its 2 grams per serving, and other times I've seen it at 5 or 6. I mostly use it as a calcium source since I eat almost no dairy, but I was wondering if the protein was of good enough quality to eat a can of spinach at nighttime instead of drinking a protein shake? Sort of odd I know...but I like to stay away from a lot of liquids after a certain hour.

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Post by TimD » Tue Feb 03, 2009 12:44 pm

I certainly wouldn't substitute it for a good protein source, be it a powder or some type of animal/fish source. #1, there isn't that much in a can of spinach, #2, vegetable sources are usually incomplete profiles of the amino acids, and aren't that readily absorbed. Best bet, wash the spnach down with a shake or glass of milk.
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Post by stuward » Tue Feb 03, 2009 1:09 pm

Spinach may not be the best protein source, simply due to the fact that it's hard to eat enough, but the protein that's there is pretty good.
http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/vege ... cts/2629/2

I wouldn't worry about the amount of protein on the label. Every manufacturer has a different way of measuring it and there may be differences in serving size. I think you can assume 30% of calories from protein.

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Post by jtw » Wed Feb 04, 2009 10:27 am

what about some cottage cheese before bed? no fiber like spinach, but it's a great low-fat protein source.

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Post by ironmaiden708 » Wed Feb 04, 2009 11:40 am

Soy based protein

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Post by stuward » Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:24 pm

ironmaiden708 wrote:Soy based protein
Is this an example of what not to eat? It's it's not feremented, don't eat soy.

Hard boiled eggs are a good protein snack. The fat is a bonus.

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Post by Rucifer » Wed Feb 04, 2009 3:21 pm

stuward wrote:
ironmaiden708 wrote:Soy based protein
Is this an example of what not to eat? It's it's not feremented, don't eat soy.

Hard boiled eggs are a good protein snack. The fat is a bonus.
What exactly is fermented soy?

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Post by stuward » Wed Feb 04, 2009 6:05 pm

It's the way they eat soy in Asia. Tofu is the most common. Most North Americans eat it a protein substitute in processed foods and it's not healthy mainly because of the phytoestrogens.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermented_soy_products

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Post by daniel4738 » Thu Feb 05, 2009 2:11 pm

jtw wrote:what about some cottage cheese before bed? no fiber like spinach, but it's a great low-fat protein source.
Cottage cheese has a very high Insulin index. Please someone correct me if I am wrong but you really don't want cottage cheese/insulin before bed.

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Post by TimD » Thu Feb 05, 2009 3:19 pm

Cottage cheese is a very good protein source, and fairly slow digesting. It is low on the GI, causing a limited rise in blood sugar. Yes, it is true that it is fairly high on the II, but so are almost all meats/fish/fowl, but with little rise in blood sugar levels. What does this ean? A good explanation is here
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/insulin-index/
Tim

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Post by ironmaiden708 » Fri Feb 06, 2009 9:16 am

n human beings, phytoestrogens are readily absorbed, circulate in plasma and are excreted in the urine. Metabolic influence is different from that of grazing animals due to the differences between ruminant versus monogastric digestive systems.


Phytoestrogen in men
The use of phytoestrogens (as soy protein) in fast food meals and other processed foods as a low-cost substitute for meat products may lead to consumption of isoflavonoids by fast food eaters. A research team at the Queen's University in Belfast, in a review article, speculate that such intake may lead to a slight decrease in male fertility, including a decrease in reproductive capability if isoflavones are taken in excess during childhood. [16]

In theory, exposure to high levels of phytoestrogens in men could alter their hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, studies have shown that such a hormonal effect is minor. It may have health benefits for men. [17] Isoflavones supplementation has no effect in sperm concentration, count or mobility and show no changes in testicular or ejaculate volume.[18][19] Researchers are studying if phytoestrogens can prevent prostate cancer. [20]


Phytoestrogen in women
There are conflicting studies, and it is unclear if phytoestrogens have any effect on the cause or prevention of cancer in women.[21][22]. Epidemiological studies showed a protective effect against breast cancer.[23] in vitro studies concluded that women with current or past breast cancer should be aware of the risks of potential tumor growth when taking soy products, as they can stimulate the growth of estrogen receptor-positive cells in vitro. The potential for tumor growth was found related only with small concentration of genistein and protective effects were found with larger concentrations of the same phytoestrogen.[24] A 2006 review article stated the opinion that not enough information is available, and that even if isoflavones have mechanisms to inhibit tumor growth, in vitro results justify the need to evaluate, at cellular level, the impact of isoflavones on breast tissue in women at high risk for breast cancer.[25] The generally accepted position on this topic is that phytoestrogens may be beneficial for healthy women and that women with known breast cancer should be aware of potential risks and consider avoiding consumption until more information is available.[18]


Phytoestrogen in infant formula
Some studies have found that some concentrations of isoflavones may have effects on intestinal cells. At low doses, genistein acted as a weak estrogen and stimulated cell growth; at high doses, it inhibited proliferation and altered cell cycle dynamics. This biphasic response correlates with how genistein is thought to exert its effects.[26]

Some reviews express the opinion that more research is needed to answer the question of what effect phytoestrogens may have on infants[27][28], but their authors did not find any adverse effects. Multiple studies conclude there are no adverse effects in human growth, development, or reproduction as a result of the consumption of soy-based infant formula compared to conventional cow-milk formula.[29][30][29][31] While it should be noted that all infant formulas are inferior to human milk, soy formula presents no more risk than cow-milk formula.[32] One of these studies, published at the Journal of Nutrition[31], concludes that:

"...there is no clinical concerns with respect to nutritional adequacy, sexual development, neurobehavioral development, immune development, or thyroid disease. SBIFs provide complete nutrition that adequately supports normal infant growth and development. FDA has accepted SBIFs as safe for use as the sole source of nutrition"

Clinical guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics state: "although isolated soy protein-based formulas may be used to provide nutrition for normal growth and development, there are few indications for their use in place of cow milk-based formula. These indications include (a) for infants with galactosemia and hereditary lactase deficiency (rare) and (b) in situations in which a vegetarian diet is preferred."[
Get a soy protein isolate for greater purity.

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Post by daniel4738 » Fri Feb 06, 2009 10:12 am

TimD wrote:Cottage cheese is a very good protein source, and fairly slow digesting. It is low on the GI, causing a limited rise in blood sugar. Yes, it is true that it is fairly high on the II, but so are almost all meats/fish/fowl, but with little rise in blood sugar levels. What does this ean? A good explanation is here
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/insulin-index/
Tim
Tim. Great article, really clears the issue up. Yet another reminder that we are all still beginners :)

I had always associated insulin spikes with fat gain, but the article explains otherwise. :)

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