Too much fat in my diet

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stuward
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Post by stuward » Tue Jan 12, 2010 2:59 pm

Sat fat causes the LDLs to get large and fluffy. By volume the amount goes up but the numbers go down. It's the small ones that are harmful.

Its carbs that cause large numbers of small LDL's and triglicerides. The small LDLs are highly oxidative and are harmful. Likewise the trigicerides are harmful. The large fluffy LDLs and HDLs are protective. The problem is that the LDL number you're looking act is a group of potenntially harmful and protective elements and no meaningful conclusion can be drawn.

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Post by stuward » Thu Jan 14, 2010 2:57 pm

New study:
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstrac ... 09.27725v1
A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies showed that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD or CVD.

Johnny
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Post by Johnny » Tue Mar 23, 2010 8:28 am

Update my lipid profile test. (mg/dl)
Clolesterol 264
Triglycerides 32
HDL 68
LDL 185

Blood Urea Nitrogen
BUN 24.9

The result is a lot better than the last time although it's still higher than the doctor's good health range. So the good new is I don't have to take any medication. However, the doctor had a comment on my BUN and Creatinine which are too high and I should lower my protein intake or my kidney could have a problem filter out the waste from my body. Maybe I'll try to drink more water.

frogbyte
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Post by frogbyte » Tue Mar 23, 2010 11:18 am

Are you taking creatine?

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Post by jml » Tue Mar 23, 2010 11:16 pm

that BUN doesn't seem that high - just the result of a higher protein diet...

thats in mg/dL right?

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Post by Jebus » Wed Mar 24, 2010 7:19 am

stuward wrote:New study:
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstrac ... 09.27725v1
A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies showed that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD or CVD.

The hospital that did that study is currently doing another study relating to cholesterol. http://www.chori.org/Clinical_Studies/CRC/DELL_09.html

So if you know anyone in Oakland... I would be interested in being in a study haha on my high fat diet.

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Post by Johnny » Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:29 am

frogbyte wrote:Are you taking creatine?
No, but I aim for at least 170g of protein per day, plus and extra 25g after workout. I weigh 185lb.

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Post by stuward » Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:01 am

I've been thinking about this for a while but I've been heisitating since I'm not in the medical profession and don't want to give medical advice.

However, since I like giving my opinions I will.

Blood tests are like pictures. They describe a thing, but they are not the thing. Neither are symptoms. Many treat the tests as if they are the thing, and that's what gets treated. It's the lab results and symptoms that get treated, not the desease or the patient. Sometimes, that's like removing the battery from the smoke detector to get it to stop ringing. The effciacy of different tests is debatable and we've talked about that before.

Most tests measure associations between indicators and desease in normal populations. The problem comes when an individual doesn't fit in the "normal" population.

Someone who's "normal" eats a diet consisting of mostly carbs, too much sugar, too much gluten, too much Omega 6, too little protein and omega 3. As well, the "normal" person's workout consists of jogging on a treadmill for 30-60 minutes several times a week with the odd yoga or pilates class for strength building. This is the population we're being compared to. Personally, I'd give up having some odd test results in favor of having reduced heart desease and cancer risk, reduced inflamation, improved insulin response, better mobility and strength than "normal" people. I like going in to my doctor each year and hearing, nothing wrong with you, see you next year.

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