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Posted: Thu Dec 24, 2009 4:44 pm
by Jungledoc
One of the biggest guys on this forum swears by deep-fried Twizzlers.

Posted: Thu Dec 24, 2009 8:00 pm
by NightFaLL
I'm a big fan of eating everything, even if it means I have to cut a little bodyfat later on.

Something about walking away from McDonalds with 3 mcchickens, 3 double cheeseburgers and a large fry just makes my mouth water. I'm such a fatty at heart. :]

Posted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 10:41 pm
by hoosegow
Jungledoc wrote:One of the fattest guys on this forum swears by deep-fried Twizzlers.
I fixed it for you Doc.

Posted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 5:31 pm
by Rucifer
Hey I'm not fat I'm big boned :cry: .


Haha sorry Hoosegow- I just wanted to steal some of your thunder

Exercise?

Posted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 1:05 am
by imbrad07
What about the exercise guys. Should i go with exercise or not? If yes then what type of exercise i should go with?

Posted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 6:22 am
by stuward
The basic recipe is lift heavy stuff, eat, sleep, repeat. Of course the details matter.

You will have to be more specific in your questions. Read the information on this site, especially in the stickies in this forum and if you have specific questions, ask.

Posted: Wed Mar 03, 2010 8:43 am
by healthissue4qs
First is you need to see a nutritionist. It could be that your metabolism is fast. Eating processed foods is not safe. Though you are aiming to gain weight and there are a lot of processed food around that could help you with that, you still need to eat healthy foods.

Posted: Wed Mar 03, 2010 7:23 pm
by Jebus
I wouldn't recommend seeing a nutritionist, maybe a dietician atleast, but even then...

Posted: Wed Mar 03, 2010 10:57 pm
by Rucifer
What's the difference between a dietician and a nutritionist?

Posted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 5:27 am
by stuward
A nutritionist is a person who advises people on matters of nutrition. In jurisdictions such as the UK and most US states the term "nutritionist" is not legally protected. As a result, people who refer to themselves as "nutritionists" may have no officially recognized credentials. Dietitians on the other hand, have legal protections and have professional requirements. Some nutritionists rely on ideas and technologies that have little or no evidential basis. - wikipedia

Posted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 7:11 am
by KPj
stuward wrote:Some nutritionists rely on ideas and technologies that have little or no evidential basis. - wikipedia
So, what's the difference between a nutritionist and dietician, then? :lol: :lol:

KPj

Posted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 7:35 am
by healthissue4qs
KPj wrote:
stuward wrote:Some nutritionists rely on ideas and technologies that have little or no evidential basis. - wikipedia
So, what's the difference between a nutritionist and dietician, then? :lol: :lol:

KPj
Based on the definition above, its the official documents that makes the difference. However, they both function the same. You can both ask them on what are the good food for you and tells you whats not good.

Posted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 9:30 am
by KPj
Sorry, I was joking. My dad has a 'dietician' and she will also...

"rely on ideas and technologies that have little or no evidential basis. - wikipedia"

Was just being a bit of an a$$ :roll:

KPj

Posted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 11:30 am
by stuward
I got the joke. I think that's what Jebus was refering to when he said "but even then...". Here in NS only diaticians can call themselves nutritionist so the terms are interchangeable.

I tend to discount what they say unless it matches what I've read or experienced myself. In my opinion, too much of their training is based on conventional wisdom. Most advice is too much whole grains, too much dairy, too little read meat, and not enough attention to inflamitory agents like Omega 6 and not enough attention to limiting sugar. They automatically default to the government guidelines.

Posted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 11:55 am
by frogbyte
I've only ever talked to one nutritionist, and she recommended paleo foods only. Amazingly she'd never heard the term "paleo" (which I asked if she was going by). She'd only developed her guidelines based on evidence of allergies and diabetes etc. She was hardcore, too, she thought you shouldn't supplement protein powders, that meant you weren't eating enough meat and getting real nutrition and such.