Help training my girlfriend

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George G
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Re: Help training my girlfriend

Post by George G » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:29 am

Mog16 wrote:
Problem 2: as a long term dancer she is extremely flexible, particularly the hamstrings, so does anyone have suggestions of some ham stuff I could do? I was gonna do SDLs or RDLs (my gym doesn't allow deads, but you can usually sneak those or their variations in) but she said she didn't feel anything at all and her grip/arm strength doesn't allow her to hold a whole lot of weight (cap of prolly 50 lbs). Our gym doesn't have the ability to do GHRs and poor cuffs for cable hip extension (never, ever stay put). Any suggestions here?

Morgan
Try single leg rdls (http://www.eiu.edu/~strength/lowerbody_ ... umbbellrdl)

She won't need a lot of weight, so grip won't be an issue. She might need to practice balance unloded or lightly loaded. Don't get discouraged if balance is an issue at first.

And another thing. What she feels is not that important. If she can do 10 reps in good form with weight X, but not weight X+5, then you are getting a training effect.

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Wouter
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Post by Wouter » Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:18 pm

If your girlfriend is going to cycle, just be sure to give her a good bike (normally atleast $700 MTB or cross bike[eg. my bike is a 'Bulls CL-500'] and $1500 race) to increase performance greatly. She should also have a good position on the bike: the better the position, the better the performance WILL GET in some time (she'll also get better leg proportions).

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Post by George G » Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:41 pm

Wouter wrote:If your girlfriend is going to cycle, just be sure to give her a good bike (normally atleast $700 MTB or cross bike[eg. my bike is a 'Bulls CL-500'] and $1500 race) to increase performance greatly. She should also have a good position on the bike: the better the position, the better the performance WILL GET in some time (she'll also get better leg proportions).
I want to add that while cycling is great activity it still a limited ROM activity and therefore it is critical to have some sort of full ROM activity in the exercise plan in addition to cycling.

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Post by Matt Z » Tue Jan 23, 2007 12:45 pm

Prices probably varry greatly by location, but I think $700 is pretty steep. I've seen good quality steel and chromolly frame bicycles for a lot less. Of course, these will weight more than an aluminum alloy, titanium or carbon fiber frame bike, but if she's just trying to get a good workout, and not planning to race competetively then it shouldn't matter.

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Post by Wouter » Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:53 am

IRT Matt Z: It's not the weight of the bike that matters the most, but the quality of the parts: Shimano Deore shifters will allow for less friction and sudden movements (= less knee pain) while you shift then a low quality shimano "unknown" and the chains can break faster when they are of lower quality. Actually had that happen while sprinting = broken teeth and painfull balls.
But Shimano Deore/Ultegra,... certainly is good enough for regular, non-competition biking.

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Post by Matt Z » Wed Jan 24, 2007 11:20 am

I see your point. I'm not too sure about the friction issue, but there are definitly sturdy, affordable bikes out there. For example, I used to have a very inexpensive (under $150) Huffy Mountain Bike when I was younger. I beat the hell out of that bike over several years and put a lot of miles on it, both on and off-road, but it held up great. The only bad thing about it was that it was heavy. In fact, I only got rid of it because I outgrew it and upgraded to a Trek (the latter cost about $400 and I still have it).

Of course, this doesn't mean that all heavy bikes are sturdy. My father used to have a Specialized mountain bike that weighted a ton, but practically self destructed the first time he took it off road, so I guess you have to shop around.

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Post by Matt Z » Wed Jan 24, 2007 11:24 am

PS.) If she has bad knees, she may want to stick with road riding, since it's a lot jarring than most trail riding.

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Post by Matt Z » Wed Jan 24, 2007 11:28 am

All this talk about riding is making me miss my bikes. I used to ride a lot, but had to stop, since I don't have room for a bike in my appartment. Right now, both my bikes are at my parents house.

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Post by Mog16 » Thu Jan 25, 2007 4:37 am

single leg rdls met with some success (she got a little sore) but when I said she is flexible I mean she really is flexible, she went up against a wall and had one leg planted and the other leg up the wall 180 degrees to the other leg while bending over in the one legged rdl fashion. Needless to say I found it difficult to focus on my workout

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