Thoughts on Abs and Obliques

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Is direct abdominal and oblique work neccissary?

Yes
6
67%
No
3
33%
 
Total votes: 9

Matt Z
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Thoughts on Abs and Obliques

Post by Matt Z » Thu Jan 25, 2007 1:29 pm

Recently, I'm beginning to think that direct abdominal and oblique training may not be neccessary, or even very beneficial ... at least not for someone who does a lot of free weight training. For example, I've noticed that, as long as I'm lifting regularly, I can skip training abs and obliques for weeks at a time only to pick up right where I left off. This leads me to believe that my core strength is mainly the result of major compound lifts, not leg raises and side bends.

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Ironman
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Post by Ironman » Thu Jan 25, 2007 2:42 pm

I voted no, but I do 1 direct ab set. I think squat and deadlift variations get it real well. I don't think obliques need to be isolated, they contract when abs do. I do one set of heavy weighted situps on a decline, just to be sure and make sure my internal hip flexors get a little work too. Even though they probably get worked during romanian deadlift.

As far as doing hundreds of 10000 rep sets of unweighted ab work, I think it is a waste of time.

I don't do much direct work and my abs are about as big as I want them and rock hard. Now if I could just shave this last bit of fat off.......

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Post by Matt Z » Fri Jan 26, 2007 11:24 am

I'm also beginning to think that, with the exception of hammer curls and/or reverse curls, direct forearm training is a waste of time. Some might add direct calf work to this list, but on that score I strongly disagree. I've made substantial gains in the size and strength of my calves (which were never small), since I started training them, and definitely pay for it if I miss doing calf raises for more than a week or two.

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Post by Ironman » Fri Jan 26, 2007 1:30 pm

Forearms don't need much. 1 bicep set with a forearm emphasis, and 1 quick set each way for wrist and 1 for grip, all with no rest. For calves, I think the soleus does not need to be targeted. Squats gets them just fine. I think even lunges and leg press do. So no need for seated. I do train the gastrocs though. I train them like any other muscle though. They need heavy weight to grow just like anything.

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Post by PaulP » Sun Jan 28, 2007 9:34 am

I voted no. I do train obliques occasionally but I feel I get good results come from the squat and deadlift variations I do. I always try to build my workouts to include squatting or deadlifting.

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Post by TimD » Sun Jan 28, 2007 1:07 pm

Ivoted no, but I think the real answer is somewhere in between. I do a lot of 1 and 2 hand lifting off the floor, in addition to squats and Turkish getups, so I don't feel obliged at all to do any direct ab or oblique work, although I do. I think that IF you are Squatting and pulling off the floor, standing on your own to feet while lifting, there really isn't any need for it. However, if you are doing most of your routine seated, then yes, do some direct ab and oblique work.
Tim

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Stephen Johnson
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Post by Stephen Johnson » Sun Jan 28, 2007 11:45 pm

Most ab work isn't geared towards hypertrophy, since big ab muscles thicken the waist. So for most people, the answer is no - IF you're talking about the high volume, bodyweight-only ab exercises. If you're interested in strengthening the abs, and don't care about a thicker waist, the answer is yes - working the abs over their range of motion with increasing amounts of resistance will benefit them. A powerlifter in my gym trains abs with weights (weighted sit ups and leg raises) regularly. As a result, he never wears a belt except when he is maxing out on his lifts. He has a thick waist, but he could stop a bullet with it

Personally, I do ab work (moderate volume, bodyweight) on cardio/stretching days, apart form weight workouts.

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Post by leif3141 » Tue Jan 30, 2007 8:16 pm

I think if you want your abs to look nice, you should train them.

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