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Rod007
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Rest

Post by Rod007 » Wed Mar 07, 2007 3:40 pm

Anyone experiement with rest times between sets for the optimum in order to gain size and strength? I have tried 1min, 90 sec and 2 mins. I can lift more with 2min intervals but I don't get as much of a pump. Which is more critical for someone lookinf for mainly size and secondarily strength?

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Post by Scott Ismari » Wed Mar 07, 2007 5:09 pm

looking for size over strength...keep the rest time under 2 min for compound moves and usually 60 sec or shorter for isolation moves. 2 min is usually sufficient time for most people to recover to almost 85-90% of their max ability between sets, since you are going for size you dont need that extra little rest time after that becuase the weight amounts wont be as great as some one going for strength (4-6 rep range).

You can always vary your workouts to suit your needs....circuit style, strip sets, super sets, giant sets, tri sets..ect.....these all reduce rest period between exercises from 30 sec to no rest at all.....as a change of pace from the usual rest time taken. This is known as cycling.
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Post by Ironman » Wed Mar 07, 2007 7:39 pm

I have to disagree on that. I think sometimes it is good to train to failure and beyond and giving yourself 3 or 4 minutes is the only way to lift as much as possible. This is for low volume training. Then sometimes you want to train with less intensity and higher volume and then you want the lower rest times. The extreme end of that at least for me, is German volume training. When I do that, if I am doing isolation sets and going back and forth between 2 muscles that aren't involved on each others lifts (like biceps and triceps), I may go as low as 60 seconds.

It's going to vary from person to person though. Everyone is going to have different recovery needs.

Another way to do volume quickly, is keep reducing the weight on each set. Say you do chest and back. You can alternate bench press with bent over row, start heavy, do 30 seconds rest and just lower the weight each set. So by the time you change the plates, it's time to lift again.

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Post by Scott Ismari » Wed Mar 07, 2007 7:53 pm

Iron, I think we just about said the same thing....just worded abit differently..

training to failure is not always about how heavy you go before you crap out, it can also be about going to momentary muscle failure on a particular weight regardless of what % it is of your one rep max or if it be 8-10 reps or just 4-6.

All working sets should be trained up to or to failure and depending on your level of experience, yes beyond positive failure. This is where negatives and/or forced reps are introduced.

We pretty much stated the same thing on drop sets, circuit style and low rest sets. Its all cool.
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Post by TimD » Wed Mar 07, 2007 8:11 pm

I saw a very loose generalization on rest periods, and percentages, with some reps ranges t in. Again, this is very loose, and came out of one of Charles Poloquin's books
12 + reps w/ 65 1 Rm or lighter 60sec rest bw sets
10-12 w/65-75% 60-90 se
6-8 w/ 75-85% 2-3 mins
1-5 w / 85-100$ 3-5 mins
So much for generalizations, but they do correlate . 12+ for endurance mainly, 6-12 eing a comination of strength on the low end, hypertrophy twoards the high end, and the 1-5 eing mainly for neural strength, but does contribute to hypertrophy to a degree. No real black and white lines.
This was loosely based on times for the CNS (central nervous system) to recover from the various levels of stressplaced on it by the various set/rep/% combinations.
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Post by Ironman » Thu Mar 08, 2007 2:55 pm

For me, if I do 12 reps of my 12 rep max, I need 4 minutes if I want my 12 rep max to still be the same weight the next set. Same thing with heavier weight. If I do 3 reps of my 3 rep max, I need the same 4 minutes. Now if I do my 20 rep max for 10, I only need 60 to 90 seconds, same thing with doing my 6 rep max for 3.

I could be different though and it is true some of my ideas are based on what is true for my body. I do tend to be able to get more reps at a higher % of 1 rep max then most people. I am also starting to think, I may overtrain much more easily then most people.

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