hip adductor exercises

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GleepGlop
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hip adductor exercises

Post by GleepGlop » Thu Mar 15, 2007 12:30 am

Hello I am trying to do exercises from home. I find the sitting down 'thighmaster' style adductor exercise much better than the standing up one where at home i would have to use an elastic or something. The problem is I don't have a thighmaster. Should I get one? Is there an adjustable thighmaster out there? What do you recommend? When I squeeze my swiss ball my legs shake which means I could improve, if only that swiss ball allowed more of a compression, so I don't really think that way is much good either... Thanks!

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Ironman
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Post by Ironman » Thu Mar 15, 2007 1:05 am

My main one for targeting that area is the sumo deadlift. It is a wide stance deadlift with the toes pointed out a bit and the hands between the legs with a narrow grip on the bar. A wide stance squat is good also. A pyle squat which is a goblet squat with a wide stance (ie holding a dumbbell in front of you), wide stance leg press is alright. Sumo deadlift with dumbbells. If you do Romanian deadlift that gets it some too, but it is still good to target it. On the deadlifts you want the bar low to the ground by the way. The nice thing with these is they work the glutes too.

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Post by GleepGlop » Thu Mar 15, 2007 3:08 am

I guess I should add that my knees aren't in great shape: I try to avoid squats and such...

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Post by Ironman » Thu Mar 15, 2007 4:33 am

If you're knees aren't very good, running and leg extensions are things you should avoid. squats, deadlifts and leg presses are not bad for knees. Of course if you are overweight, you could be to heavy to squat. I suppose it may be possible to be too heavy to deadlift, but I doubt it.

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Post by GleepGlop » Thu Mar 15, 2007 5:02 am

hmm, running and extensions i am ok with, squats and presses i am bad with... but deadlifts arent bad on the knees now that i think about it... too bad i have a bad back! ...that's why im here, folks! i didn't consider that exercises outside of ones that make an adducting motion may be good for the adductors... maybe as stabilizers... i'm kind of a novice!

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Post by stuward » Thu Mar 15, 2007 11:18 am

You really need to do squats and deadlifts. Once I started, it required the whole stack of weight on the ab/adductor machines to challenge me at all. If your back is bad, try strengthening it first. Start with back extensions, etc. Squats and deadlifts are very knee friendly compared to machines. Stick with functional exercises. One legged exercises generally are easier on the back than the more common 2 legged variety so you could try those. Step Ups put no stress on your back but work your whole leg. You can get enough variations to focus the work on any part of the leg you want.

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Post by Ironman » Thu Mar 15, 2007 3:46 pm

well, I'm kind of an expert and I'm telling you, you've got it all wrong. If you have bad knees don't run or do leg extensions. Running is very high impact, you should do a low impact activity. Leg extensions are not a natural movement and put a terrible amount of pressure on the knee joint. Squat/press are natural movements that your knee was made for. As far as your back, I guess it depends on what is wrong with it. For most people it is the lower back and you probably need to build it up with isolation exercises for the lower back, abs and hip flexors. So right now you should be more concerned with that then the firmness of the muscle on the inner thigh. You can target thigh adductors without doing adduction. You should be using as little isolation as possible.

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Post by KPj » Tue Mar 27, 2007 6:39 am

I'm not an expert but someone who has been fixing a lot of 'imbalances' and making very good progress.

You might have bad range of motion on certain movements which won't help you with squats etc so for this, Dynamic stretching / mobility drills have made a huge difference for me.

As far as i'm aware, single leg movements (lunge, reverse lunge etc) are great rehab exercises and also good for 'working up' to squats DL's etc so it may be worth while basing a program around single leg stuff to start with.

Also, some terminlogy that you hear can be quite confusing if you don't have any kind of anatomy back ground. A very simple thing that has helped me is that you should try and minimise movement from your lower back (lumbar spine) and actually move from your hips. It's also very common for people to have weak glutes which can help give you lordosis (forward hips) which can help give you lower back problems.

Sorry if I am just repeating what other have said but in different words but from personal experience, alot of the problem is that people don't understand what they are being told.

To summarise, I think you should start with dumbel lunges and reverse lunges for a while them do squats. I would also do things like Rack pulls from your knees and cable pull throughs for a while then do dead lifts.

If you've read anything you should know by now not to bother with leg extensions. Stick with compound movements and variations of them.

KP

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