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Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 1:39 pm
by Onlyethic
What are thoughts on pushups with a neck problem? My guess is that it's bad (not my neck but a friend's who does pushups daily, for some weird reason).

According to him he lacks a natural forward curvature in the neck. This leads to daily pain. My intuition is that he, at very least, should be doing back exercise to balance the pushups, or just to strengthen.

I know my description of the problem is vague and inadequate, but just wanted to hear what people think about pushups with a wonky neck.

Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 1:44 pm
by stuward
My thought is that someone doing only pushups should do something like inverted rows or chin ups as well but I can't think of any reason pushups would agravate the neck.

Posted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 12:31 pm
by Skull_Crusher
I know this is over a year old but i wanted to chime in on how great this product actually is. Anyone who's had shoulder issues pick this up immediately...like right now, leave your house and get in the car. The real brainwashed people are the ones who dismiss the product as bull simply because its on tv. You dont know till you try it. Ive had problematic shoulders for years (dislocations and whatnot), and they havent felt better. This thing really strengthens the stabilizers in your shoulders. Also dont think because you can do 50 regular pushups that you'll plop this thing down and do 50. You'll be lucky if you hit 25 as your max. You wanna try and duplicate the move go right ahead, but it wont be the same. And for the someone with jacked up shoulders,...it wont be as safe. Dont be cheap, 40 bucks isnt the end of the world, hell i even got mine on sale for 30. Best 30 bucks i ever spent on a piece of workout equipment.

Posted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 1:43 pm
by VoK
If you want a challenging pushup, do one with your hands below your waist.

I can bang out 75-80 regular pushups in 2 minutes. I can barely do 1 set of 10 with these hands-below-the-waist variation.

Posted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 3:32 pm
by pdellorto
Skull_Crusher wrote:I know this is over a year old but i wanted to chime in on how great this product actually is.
How do they compare to pushups off rings or blast straps?

Ring pushups:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CPIfBrA6HMM
(watch that one through, it shows a progression)

Blast strap pushups:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjWq1jMq0xI

You can do those from suspended chains or ropes, too, but it's way eaiser with handles (even the rotating ones on the blast straps).

Posted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:14 pm
by Ironman
It's a lot like the perfect barrel-fish shooter, The perfect candy stealer, works on any infant. The log klutz, a perfect fall every time. Perfect pie is good. or the perfect cakewalk. Perfectly silly I think.

Even if pushups are challenging for you, I don't see why you need this. Now the perfect pullup I ca understand. That's just a pullup bar you can mount on something.

Posted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 11:19 pm
by ironmaiden708
ive tried it, didn't like it. I'll stick with my pushup handles and spend my cash on something more worthwhile.

Posted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 5:34 am
by daniel4738
I like the pushup, normally I make it harder by raising my feet on a bench and using dumbbells to increase the required depth and core strength required.

I used to do them in the British army (reserves) too. Standard 1.5mile run, 2mins push ups and 2 mins of sit ups. I remember being able to push out over 100 for both pushups and sit ups in less than 2 mins, which makes them pretty redundant. On the other hand, a lot of other people would barely manage 30, which makes them relatively useful.

We also used to do a lot of circuits while training in the field, when all you have is a bergen (rucksack) and patch of grass with 20-30 men to train, they are quite useful.

The other thing is that with weight training and 30 un-instructed guys, people will injure themselves in my opinion.

As a side note on the navy seal platoon commander thing, to gain entry to the UKSF (reserve) selection course all you need to do is pass a bleep test to level 11. I even heard of them pushing the markers closer to get more people to pass. I always find it amusing that some people actually apply without being able to get to lv11 (what do they think you do on selection).

Anyway, happy new year to all.

Posted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 6:53 am
by Jungledoc
It's not "brain-washing", it's just marketing. I'm surprised how little we (as in people in general) seem to understand that. If someone has a product to sell, to try to make some money to put bread on the table, should we be surprised that they give it a name that makes it sound like a good thing, or that they use a model for their ads who makes it look good? I've seen enough advertising (and you all have too) to know that there is no guarantee that the product will produce what the brand name implies.

If someone is naive enough to think that a product called "Perfect Push-up" will really put some sort of perfection in their exercises, then they deserve to be parted from their money.

Posted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 4:51 pm
by mattk25
I just read some of these posts and I read one that said pushups weren't that good of an exercise or that you wouldn't get anything out of it. Why's this? I've been reading that they are a great exercise. I've also tried the perfect pushup and I thought it was okay, but nothing much different than using dumbbells.

Posted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 5:39 pm
by Matt Z
Standard pushups are fine for developing strength endurance, but they're pretty limited when it comes to developing limit strength.

Posted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 10:47 pm
by brook011
I got mine for 20$ with a coupon at Dicks, I don't use em much anymore, but if I'm working alot over the weekend and don't have time for the gym, they are great for their depth. I don't feel anything from the back with em, or shoulders, but my abs hurt like hell from doing em no matter what.

Posted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:52 am
by ironmaiden708
It's not "brain-washing", it's just marketing. I'm surprised how little we (as in people in general) seem to understand that. If someone has a product to sell, to try to make some money to put bread on the table, should we be surprised that they give it a name that makes it sound like a good thing, or that they use a model for their ads who makes it look good? I've seen enough advertising (and you all have too) to know that there is no guarantee that the product will produce what the brand name implies.
Marketing in some situations can be considered brainwashing.
If someone is naive enough to think that a product called "Perfect Push-up" will really put some sort of perfection in their exercises, then they deserve to be parted from their money.
There are many of those people out there. At my GNC we are getting loads of people coming in for that stupid acai (Ahh-Sigh-EE) berry. How stupid are these people? It has an ORAC value of 2000-4000 units, less than eating a large granny smith apple and people still continue to buy it and totally disreguard that logic just because that big brown elephant Opera thought it helped her lose some weight. Good job people, you bought overpriced antioxidants that will do some cleansing and won't help you lose any weight. Very aggrevating.

Posted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 5:10 am
by KPj
Push ups are as limited as you want to make them.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=rmwIEnczY ... annel_page

Personally, I don't have chains. But I have a nice selection of bands, and they add a new eliment to the exercise.

KPj

Posted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 7:21 am
by Jungledoc
ironmaiden708 wrote:
It's not "brain-washing", it's just marketing. I'm surprised how little we (as in people in general) seem to understand that. If someone has a product to sell, to try to make some money to put bread on the table, should we be surprised that they give it a name that makes it sound like a good thing, or that they use a model for their ads who makes it look good? I've seen enough advertising (and you all have too) to know that there is no guarantee that the product will produce what the brand name implies.
Marketing in some situations can be considered brainwashing.
If someone is naive enough to think that a product called "Perfect Push-up" will really put some sort of perfection in their exercises, then they deserve to be parted from their money.
There are many of those people out there. At my GNC we are getting loads of people coming in for that stupid acai (Ahh-Sigh-EE) berry. How stupid are these people? It has an ORAC value of 2000-4000 units, less than eating a large granny smith apple and people still continue to buy it and totally disreguard that logic just because that big brown elephant Opera thought it helped her lose some weight. Good job people, you bought overpriced antioxidants that will do some cleansing and won't help you lose any weight. Very aggrevating.
So how do you deal with it if a customer shows an interest in a supplement that you don't personally feel is worthwhile or is over priced? Talk them out of it? Try to redirect them to a product that you think is better?