Am I doing something wrong?

Ask or answer questions, discuss and express your views

Moderators: Ironman, Jungledoc, jethrof, parth, stuward

Neb154
Novice
Novice
Posts: 56
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:22 pm

Post by Neb154 » Wed Dec 26, 2007 6:26 pm

aman wrote:Exercising 6 days is too much; you are not giving your muscles enough time to grow. Workouts only for 3 days in a week, work more on squats and dead lifts along with bench press.
You also have to figure out your calorie and protein requirements. You need 6 meals per day, 25 gms of protein in every meal.
Also you need to change your workouts plan every two weeks sticking to same routine, would not induce much of gains.
In addition to this , honestly speaking do you dont need cardio at all..just looking at your goals i said that.
I only exercise 5 days a week.

I've followed Ironman's recommendations (so I believe that deals with the squat and bench press critique).

I have figured out my protein and calorie requirements and I do try and follow the 6 meals a day plan.

And for the variety, that is my question. I was looking for suggestions on how to vary my repetitions and weights in my exercises.


User avatar
TimD
In Memoriam: TimD
In Memoriam: TimD
Posts: 3129
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 8:04 am
Location: Va Beach, Va

Post by TimD » Wed Dec 26, 2007 7:40 pm

Aman, why do you (and others) make these blanket statements like "you cannot workout 6 days a week"? That's just plain wrong/idiotic. You have to take intensity, areas involved, and volume into consideration. Most of the national OL teams around the world workout 6 days/week, on FULLBODY moves, 5 or 6 times a day. YES, they're elite, but they also BALANCE the above criteria. I go 7 times/week, fullbody, at age 58, but again, BALANCED. Only 2-3 times/week over 80%, and alot is with bodyweight, etc, and can be considered active recovery. in the old days, the bodybuilder/lifters used to do manual labor all day, then come homeand work out hard for 3-4 times a week.
Tim

aman
Novice
Novice
Posts: 67
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 7:58 am

Post by aman » Thu Dec 27, 2007 2:30 am

hi tim,

just by looking at his goal i said that. i feel , my statement should be taken in context of his post rather than as a general comment.
Four years ago , i was also one of those people who would excerise really hard in the gym for around five days...and would not grow. i feel its important that we do more of compound excersieses and eat plently of calories and protein to grow to achieve the goal he has for the best results.

aman
Novice
Novice
Posts: 67
Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 7:58 am

Post by aman » Thu Dec 27, 2007 2:33 am

Neb154 wrote:
aman wrote:Exercising 6 days is too much; you are not giving your muscles enough time to grow. Workouts only for 3 days in a week, work more on squats and dead lifts along with bench press.
You also have to figure out your calorie and protein requirements. You need 6 meals per day, 25 gms of protein in every meal.
Also you need to change your workouts plan every two weeks sticking to same routine, would not induce much of gains.
In addition to this , honestly speaking do you dont need cardio at all..just looking at your goals i said that.
I only exercise 5 days a week.

I've followed Ironman's recommendations (so I believe that deals with the squat and bench press critique).

I have figured out my protein and calorie requirements and I do try and follow the 6 meals a day plan.

And for the variety, that is my question. I was looking for suggestions on how to vary my repetitions and weights in my exercises.
you may look at dr.squat abc routines for the same besides plenty of information available on this website.

User avatar
Ironman
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 3992
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 11:40 am

Post by Ironman » Thu Dec 27, 2007 6:27 am

I think one of you is talking about working out in general and the other is talking about heavy weight training. Obviously, you can exercise every day, but you can't do heavy weight training every day.


Neb154
Novice
Novice
Posts: 56
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:22 pm

Post by Neb154 » Sun Feb 17, 2008 11:58 pm

An update:

I've had mixed results with the plan. While I definitely was pushing myself during the workouts, I think it was mostly my diet that held me back on real strength gains. I was eating like I wasn't sure if I wanted to gain or to cut, and the result was I really did neither.

I went from this:

Edit: Bench, Incline, and Shoulder are with DBs, i.e. 50 in each hand.

November 29
Lat Pull Down 8 x 140, 8 x 140
Pull Ups 8 x 50, 8 x 50, 8 x 50
1 Armed Dumbell Rows 8 x 60, 8 x 60, 8 x 60, 8 x 60, 8 x 60
Shrugs 8 x 50, 8 x 50, 8 x 55, 8 x 55
Bicep Curls 8 x 25, 8 x 25
Hammer Curls 8 x 25, 8s x 25
Rear Delt Rows 8 x 100, 8 x 125

Legs Dec 2, 2007
Squats 8 x 135, 8 x 135, 8 x 155, 8 x 155, 8 x 185, 8 x 185
Standing Calf Raises 8 x 125, 8 x 125, 8 x 125, 8 x 135 , 8 x 135, 8 x 135
Dead Lifts 8 x 95, 8 x 95, 8 x 95, 8 x 95, 8 x 95, 8 x 95

Chest and Shoulders Dec 5, 2007
Bench Press 8 x 50, 8 x 50, 8 x 55, 8 x 55, 8s x 55
Incline Press 8 x 35, 8 x 35, 8 x 40, 8 x 40, 8 x 40
Dips 8 x 50, 8 x 50, 8 x 40
Lateral Raises 8 x 20, 8 x 20, 8 x 20, 8 x 20
Shoulder Press 8 x 30, 8 x 35


To this:

Jan 3, 2008
8 x 150 8 x 150
8 x 40, 6 x 30, 4s x 20
8 x 60, 6 x 65, 4 x 70, 4 x 75, 4s x 80
8 x 60, 8 x 60, 8 x 60, 8 x 60
8 x 30, 4s x 35
8 x 25, 4s x 30
8 x 130, 4 x 145

Head Cold Jan 7, 2008
8 x 135, 8 x 155, 8 x 155, 8 x 155, 8 x 195, 8 x 195
8 x 155, 8 x 155, 8 x 155, 8 x 155, 8 x 155, 8 x 155
8 x 115, 8 x 125, 8 x 135, 8 x 135, 8 x 145, 8 x 145

Jan 8, 2007
8 x 55, 8 x 55, 8 x 55, 8 x 55, 8 x 55
8 x 40, 8 x 40, 8 x 40, 8 x 45, 8 x 45
8 x 40, 8 x 40, 8 x 40
8 x 20, 8 x 20, 8 x 25, 8 x 22.5
8 x 40, 8 x 40

This is when I started having shoulder trouble again. After a dislocation, I was out for a month, and now I'm off of the bench, shoulder press, incline, and dips.

I'm looking for a new program to do once I can get all my exercises in order (hopefully after this physical therapy). I was looking around, and the Super Squat routine seemed like something I might want to do (though I can no longer do backsquats because of my shoulder, and I am making the transition to front squats). I've been following stuward's advice and eating a lot more, hoping to gain on the few days I can lift.

I am looking for suggestions on what plans I may want to look at, so that with the right diet, I can finally achieve substantial results.


Thanks in advance.

shaf_43
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 24
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2008 7:24 pm
Location: Norfolk, NE

Post by shaf_43 » Mon Feb 18, 2008 10:49 pm

To get muscle hypertrophy (growth) concentrate more on your reps and recovery in between sets. You will find your best results if you increase your reps to 10-12 and rest 60-90 seconds between (3-4) sets. It is important to choose a weight that you can do your last rep as good as your first.

I've had best results doing a four day a week split routine for lifting, but still exercising 6 days a week.

If you would like specific examples i would be happy to respond to a personal message. (I don't have time to find the links that undeniably back up my statement) also take the advise of the folks that will hold may post under a microscope because the best answer is most likely a combination of reply's.

KPj
Deific Wizard of Sagacity
Deific Wizard of Sagacity
Posts: 3482
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:49 am

Post by KPj » Tue Feb 19, 2008 5:00 am

I disagree with this,
To get muscle hypertrophy (growth) concentrate more on your reps and recovery in between sets. You will find your best results if you increase your reps to 10-12 and rest 60-90 seconds between (3-4) sets. It is important to choose a weight that you can do your last rep as good as your first.
But my reasons are stated later on in your post :-)
because the best answer is most likely a combination of reply's
Personally, i've had better results for Hypertrophy lifting in the 2-5 rep range. I lift to one rep shy of failure, take a long rest between sets, and I lift as fast as possible in every rep. This was a surprise because admittedly, if hypertrophy was a focus I wouldn't have opted for that rep range. But really, there's more to building muscle than 'time under tension' (the amount of reps per set), Volume and load are just as important.

"The best program is the one your not doing"

To the OP,

Stick to your plan, monitor your results, if after 4-8 weeks the results are poorer than you expected, look at what you can change. Your body will eventually adapt, so change is necessary at some point.


KPj

Neb154
Novice
Novice
Posts: 56
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:22 pm

Post by Neb154 » Tue Feb 19, 2008 11:39 pm

KPj wrote:I disagree with this,
To get muscle hypertrophy (growth) concentrate more on your reps and recovery in between sets. You will find your best results if you increase your reps to 10-12 and rest 60-90 seconds between (3-4) sets. It is important to choose a weight that you can do your last rep as good as your first.
But my reasons are stated later on in your post :-)
because the best answer is most likely a combination of reply's
Personally, i've had better results for Hypertrophy lifting in the 2-5 rep range. I lift to one rep shy of failure, take a long rest between sets, and I lift as fast as possible in every rep. This was a surprise because admittedly, if hypertrophy was a focus I wouldn't have opted for that rep range. But really, there's more to building muscle than 'time under tension' (the amount of reps per set), Volume and load are just as important.

"The best program is the one your not doing"

To the OP,

Stick to your plan, monitor your results, if after 4-8 weeks the results are poorer than you expected, look at what you can change. Your body will eventually adapt, so change is necessary at some point.


KPj
Well I guess the issue is that I think I need change now, after using the program for 8 weeks or so.

pdellorto
Deific Wizard of Sagacity
Deific Wizard of Sagacity
Posts: 5252
Joined: Mon May 28, 2007 8:43 am
Location: New Jersey
Contact:

Post by pdellorto » Wed Feb 20, 2008 12:09 am

Neb154 wrote:Well I guess the issue is that I think I need change now, after using the program for 8 weeks or so.
I've read that the body adapts the fastest to new rep ranges and the slowest to new exercises. I'm not sure if that's true or not, but if it is the suggestion would be that you change your rep scheme up even if you don't change the exercises. Maybe go to 5 reps for some of your big lifts, go from 8 to 10-12 reps on some of the others. For example:

Squats: 5 rep work sets (say, 3x5 straight across or 5x5 increasing weight)
Calf Raises: 10 rep work sets (3 x 10 straight across, or maybe 5x10 increasing weight)
Deadlift: 5 rep work sets (5x5 is a lot after squats, maybe 1-3x5)

You can do that for a few weeks and then do a week of 8-rep sets and see where that's gotten you....

I know this works for me sometimes. I'll drop from 5 rep sets to 3 rep sets and up the weight for new PR, and then go back to 5 rep sets the next week. Or take a break from heavy 5 rep sets by doing multiple 10-rep sets instead as a change of pace.

Hope that helps,

Peter

DontPanic
n00b
n00b
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu May 29, 2008 3:09 am

Post by DontPanic » Thu May 29, 2008 3:14 am

Ironman wrote:No doubt, that sums up the problem with virtually every new poster that goes to any fitness or bodybuilding board. Yea "eat more and don't overtrain" is told to pretty much everyone. When you sign up for any board like that, on the form it should say "Not making progress?" "well, eat more and stop overtraining, more details available inside." lol That goes double for the young guys. They are the most notorious for being like 150 lbs, posting a diet with 3 meals and 1800 calories, and a workout that looks like Jay Cutler's pre-contest routine.
It's funny that you posted this right when I started working out.

By the time I recover from falling behing on my diet, while over doing it in the gym, I will likely be back to my starting weight.

User avatar
Ironman
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 3992
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 11:40 am

Post by Ironman » Thu May 29, 2008 4:38 am

Just eat a lot of protein. That should keep your gains. Then when you start back, start very low volume, like 1 set each. Then just progressively add to it. After a deload it doesn't take much to get the desired effect.

Manofsteel319
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 271
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 1:10 pm

Post by Manofsteel319 » Thu May 29, 2008 9:52 am

Ironman what is your definition of deload in your opinion.

DontPanic
n00b
n00b
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu May 29, 2008 3:09 am

Post by DontPanic » Thu May 29, 2008 3:02 pm

Assuming it means what I think it means, that's what I have in mind when I start back up. However, I'm going to go get something checked out by a Dr first because I don't think the last Dr (a few years ago) had my current goals in mind last time I talked to a Dr about it.

I figure I need to do more of a low weight/high rep core focus type thing for a few months but I'll leave that up to the professionals. :green:

Edit: Oh, and I've been supplementing with these 35g protein shakes starting earlier this week.

User avatar
Ironman
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 3992
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 11:40 am

Post by Ironman » Fri May 30, 2008 4:15 am

deload just means a short easy workout, less often. You do that for a couple weeks to recover.


Post Reply