How much body weight?

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recmatt
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How much body weight?

Post by recmatt » Fri Dec 14, 2007 7:22 pm

Hi Guys, I use weighted incline push-ups to simulate decline bench press. Does anyone know what percentage of your body weight you are pressing when performing a push-up on one foot? Just curious.

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Stephen Johnson
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Re: How much body weight?

Post by Stephen Johnson » Sat Dec 15, 2007 10:52 am

recmatt wrote:Hi Guys, I use weighted incline push-ups to simulate decline bench press. Does anyone know what percentage of your body weight you are pressing when performing a push-up on one foot? Just curious.
I think that I remember reading once that the standard push up uses between 60-70% of your bodyweight - but I'm not 100% sure.

If you have a bathroom scale, you can assume the start position of the exercise with your hands on the scale. That should give you a ballpark estimate

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Post by caangelxox » Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:38 pm

How can you perform a push up on one foot? I cannot picture that in my head. The only thing I can picture is doing a push up on your side in the side plank positon, but with arm straight instead of forearm on ground

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Post by Ironman » Sun Dec 16, 2007 1:57 pm

cross your legs.

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Post by caangelxox » Mon Dec 17, 2007 2:26 am

ohhh

is that the next level up after a regular push up?

There are also many variations as well. There is "Diamond Push Up", which I cannot really do yet and there is also wide grip push ups, which I can do.

I know that for pull ups - wide grips, neutral grip, overhand grip, and underhand grip must be used to get all the different areas of the shoulders/lats or whatever the person on here told me (I forgot the exact muscle movements for each). Are Push Ups pretty much the same way?

Do all the different variations work the same areas or different muscles? I know all of these target the chest and some triceps. What muscles do each below work and its rotation/extension or whatever? I know incline is different than decline, and regular is different than both of those.

- Diamond Push Up
- Regular Push Up
- Wide Grip Push Up
- Push Up on one foot (I am thinking that is probably the next level up from regular push ups and make it harder and the next level up is probably push up on one arm and opposite leg. Then I think after that is oblique push up on your side. I'm just guessing.).
- Decline Push Up
- Incline Push Up

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Post by RugbyExiSci » Tue Dec 18, 2007 2:05 pm

Oh so many push-up variations. One of these days I'll write a book I swear I'm going to...

Narrow grip
Wide grip
Elbows out (more pec)
Elbows in (close to body, more tricep)
Feet on various levels of stairs
One hand on med ball, transfer on ball to other hand, ball stays stationary
one hand on balance disc
two hands on stability ball
clap push-ups
box drop plyo push-ups
one-handers
one leg (other leg straight 6 inches off ground)
push-ups gripping dumbbells w/ alternating single arm row (watch the balance)

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Post by caangelxox » Tue Dec 18, 2007 2:57 pm

- Modified Push Up
- wide grip push up
- regular push up
- diamond push up
- medicine ball one hand push up
- medicine ball (2 balls) push up
- incline push up
- decline push up
- one leg off ground push up
- one leg/opposite hand off ground push up
- scap pushups
- Hindu
- One Arm Push Up

In order, what would you think the easiest to the hardest would be as far as strength building with bodyweight? I know Modified would be first, then regular push ups, and so on. The one hand ones would be last.

This is what I know of from searching around the internet...Also I don't know the name of all these veriations in this push up variations video, but its pretty cool how this guy made up a bunch of different ones. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QE2AcqxjmL8

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Post by caangelxox » Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:39 am

Okay I found this website (random) when reading posts on another fitness board.

http://www.ronjones.org/Coach&Train/Bod ... index.html All the Push up Variations that the owner of that website knows and levels. It starts off at the modified military, then goes to military, and so on. The only kind of push ups on that site I don't like is the headstand one and standing on the wall from seeing the pictures. I would never do anything upside down.

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Post by pdellorto » Wed Dec 19, 2007 3:01 am

Handstand pushups are a mainstay of Crossfit. One guy - the Beastskills guy - just passed a challenge workout doing them on rings - upside down on the rings, feet against the straps.

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Post by stuward » Wed Dec 19, 2007 6:39 am

Working upside down aids in training proprioception, which is being able to sense the relative position of neighbouring parts of the body. This fitness aspect is helpful in all sports, especially skill based sports like softball.

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Post by recmatt » Wed Dec 19, 2007 6:08 pm

I tried the bathroom scales and the weight of my body was 132pounds at the start of the movement and 121 at the top. I weigh 171 and I usually have my 6 year old son who weighs almost 50pounds sit on my upper back. However I don't know if I could push the equivalent weight (171 -182)on a decline bench for 8-10 reps.

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