Performance Standards and age factor

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tostig
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Performance Standards and age factor

Post by tostig » Sun Dec 23, 2007 10:23 pm

Does anybody know if weight lifting performance standards account for age?

Here's the site with the performance standard per experience and per body weight but no age factor is indicated.

http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifti ... ndards.htm


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Post by Matt Z » Mon Dec 24, 2007 7:14 am

Most strength standards are geared toward high school and college atheletes, so they aren't as useful for middle-aged and older adults.
Last edited by Matt Z on Mon Dec 24, 2007 7:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Matt Z » Mon Dec 24, 2007 7:23 am

PS.) Even among young adults of the same age, on the same program, some will progress faster or slower than predicted (and/or be stronger or weaker at the onset). However, strength standards can give you a good idea of where you are in terms of ballance and proportion. For example, if your "Advanced" in the Bench Press and only a "Novice" or "Beginner" in the squat and deadlift, then you probably need to focus more on legs.

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Post by Matt Z » Mon Dec 24, 2007 9:45 am

Also, I think the general descriptions are more useful than the actual time tables. For example:

An "Untrained" level of strength is described as the "Expected level of strength in a healthy individual who has not trained on the exercise before but can performit correctly. This represents the minimum level of strength required to maintain a reasonable quality of life in a sedentary individual." Meanwhile, a "Novice" level of strength is described as supporting the demands of vigorous recreational activities.

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Post by tostig » Mon Dec 24, 2007 11:12 am

I'm 46. I wouldn't think the values on these charts would be fully applicable to all ages, say for example 75 years old. So I was wondering if there was an age multiplying factor to apply to these values.

I'm heading off to the gym this morning and will be testing out what my calculated 1 rep max will be.


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Post by Matt Z » Mon Dec 24, 2007 1:29 pm

I don't know of any formula that would allow you to adjust for age. There are some strength atheletes your age and older who qualify for the elete category, and plenty of sedentary people my age (26) who can't do one good push up.

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Post by Matt Z » Mon Dec 24, 2007 1:33 pm

PS.) Many strength atheletes don't peak until sometime in the 40s. It's definitely not an are where young atheletes dominate.

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Stephen Johnson
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Re: Performance Standards and age factor

Post by Stephen Johnson » Mon Dec 24, 2007 5:36 pm

tostig wrote:Here's the site with the performance standard per experience and per body weight but no age factor is indicated.

http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifti ... ndards.htm
The link that you listed is unresolved. Did you intend to use this link?

As for your question about age-adjusted strength standards, it's something that this site should think about including. Maybe TimD or Ironman could show us how to make a request for age-adjusted strength standards (if available) to be added to this site.

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Re: Performance Standards and age factor

Post by tostig » Mon Dec 24, 2007 6:48 pm

Stephen Johnson wrote:...
The link that you listed is unresolved. Did you intend to use this link?
Yes, that's exactly right.
Stephen Johnson wrote:As for your question about age-adjusted strength standards, it's something that this site should think about including. Maybe TimD or Ironman could show us how to make a request for age-adjusted strength standards (if available) to be added to this site.
The good news is that I beat the Intermediate for the Bench Press, met the Advance on the Squats, and did better than un-trained for the Deadlift.

I don't dare do the Press or the Clean as I am worried about lower back problems (age, eh?).

The bad news is that I still need to work on my form.

This site is the only one I could find that makes any reference to age.
http://www.brianmac.co.uk/bpress.htm

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Post by Stephen Johnson » Mon Dec 24, 2007 8:56 pm

@tostig:

Another problem with the strength standards is that they're based strictly by bodyweight. I weigh 225-230 pounds, but stand 6'6". A person who is 6' or shorter and weighs 230 will probably move more weight than me, particularly if they have short arms and legs.

Still, my best lifts put me in the intermediate class for everything except the power clean, where I'm still a novice, at age 54.

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Post by Matt Z » Tue Dec 25, 2007 7:31 pm

Also, they don't account for body composition. This makes a big difference for people who are severely overweight, since someone who's 200 lbs and fat isn't likely to be anywhere near as strong as someone the same height and weight who's lean and muscular.

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Post by hoosegow » Thu Dec 27, 2007 11:00 am

Okay admittedly this is for my ego, but does anyone know of any charts/studies showing the number or percentage of men at certain weights?

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Post by Stephen Johnson » Thu Dec 27, 2007 11:10 am

hoosegow wrote:Okay admittedly this is for my ego, but does anyone know of any charts/studies showing the number or percentage of men at certain weights?
No, but you can determine where your weight stands among US men in your age group (as well as calculate your BMI) here.

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Post by hoosegow » Thu Dec 27, 2007 1:20 pm

Heck. I'll just drop it. If I ask any more questions, I'll appear to be a real mule hole. I don't need any more help with appearing as one.

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Post by Matt Z » Thu Dec 27, 2007 1:48 pm

http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifti ... dards.html

According to this, less than 1% of the weight training population will reach the elite level.


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