Performance Standards and age factor

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hoosegow
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Post by hoosegow » Thu Dec 27, 2007 3:21 pm

Maybe this would be a better question to ask. Are there any charts/graphs that shows what percent of the population can lift X amount of weight, regardless of how much they weigh?


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Stephen Johnson
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Post by Stephen Johnson » Thu Dec 27, 2007 4:31 pm

hoosegow wrote:Maybe this would be a better question to ask. Are there any charts/graphs that shows what percent of the population can lift X amount of weight, regardless of how much they weigh?
Sorry, I misunderstood you.

There probably aren't any graphs like that of the entire population - most people don't weight train

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Post by tostig » Mon Dec 31, 2007 3:34 pm

Matt Z wrote:Also, they don't account for body composition. This makes a big difference for people who are severely overweight, since someone who's 200 lbs and fat isn't likely to be anywhere near as strong as someone the same height and weight who's lean and muscular.
I respectfully disagree. Those charts are for standards (not norms) as indicated on the web page. So an overweight person must work towards one of those categories. When he reaches that goal, he would be on his way to becoming more fit.

Here's a site where the standard in age-related.
http://www.hamptonpd.com/employ/agility/pushup.htm

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Post by stuward » Mon Dec 31, 2007 4:12 pm

The YMCA Bench Press test is age specific as well:
http://www.exrx.net/Calculators/YBenchPress.html

You know what I find strange is that for a 51 year old man, the average number of pushups is 21 while for the 80# bench press the average number of reps is 13. I can go all day with an 80# bench press but I sure can't do that with pushups. I guess these tests aren't normalized for someone that's 6'2" and 205#.

I think this book probably has the information you were looking for:
"Norms for Fitness, Performance, and Health"
http://www.humankinetics.com/products/s ... 0736054836

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Post by Matt Z » Mon Dec 31, 2007 5:16 pm

http://www.hamptonpd.com/employ/agility/pushup.htm

You have to remember though, these are MINIMUM standards.


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Post by Matt Z » Mon Dec 31, 2007 5:37 pm

Also, these standards reflect performance trends within the general (mostly untrained) population. Performance trends for the weight training population are very different.

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Post by Matt Z » Mon Dec 31, 2007 5:46 pm

For example, most untrained men and women peak in terms of strength and muscle mass sometime in their late teens or early twenties, and steadily decline thereafter. Strength athletes on the other hand, often continue getting stronger straight through their twenties, thirties and even early forties, before their performance begins to decline.

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Post by Matt Z » Mon Dec 31, 2007 5:54 pm

Think about it. Who are the strongest guys at your gym? Or the strongest guys on this forum? Are they all 18 and 20-year-olds, or are most of them much older?

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Post by stuward » Mon Dec 31, 2007 6:12 pm

When I was googling around for strength norms there were lots of examples of grip strength norms. It seems that norms are relatively (+/- 10%) constant from 20 up to 50 and then they start to decline significantly in the 60s. I know that there is debate on whether hand grip strength correlates with general strength or not, but that would suggest that it's possible to retain most of your strength into your 50s.

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Post by hoosegow » Wed Jan 02, 2008 12:52 pm

Except for one ex-Division one offensive lineman (the guy is huge) all are in their mid 30's.

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Post by tostig » Wed Jan 02, 2008 12:57 pm

stuward wrote:The YMCA Bench Press test is age specific as well:
http://www.exrx.net/Calculators/YBenchPress.html
Would this test work for dumbells?


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