Can anyone help me with my imbalances (picures included)

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caangelxox
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Post by caangelxox » Wed Jan 02, 2008 7:43 pm

okay thank you=)

It would have to be spinal alignment because if it was bone length, the chiropractor would not of been able to do an adjustment and even out my legs. When he evens them out, I need to figure out how to keep them even.


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Post by KPj » Thu Jan 03, 2008 7:27 am

I'm going to have a more in depth look later on today, but after a quick glance over your posts and look at the pictures, I think you could be over reacting a little - don't panic!

Be careful not to look into things too much. First, just figure out which muscles are weak and which muscles are tight and over used. After all, that's all an imbalance really is, right?

I was pretty impressed with your posture... quite good foot position. Your hand position was also good - are these pictures your absolute natural / relaxed posture? Some things confuse me... Your shoulders from behind look a LITTLE internally rotated (left more than right), but from the front they don't as indicated by the palm of your hands pointing towards your legs (must weekend warriors will have palms facing behind them). Also from behind your shoulder blades look retracted and depressed but the right and left side pics show tight upper traps which also falls in place with internal rotation of the shoulders. You can tell this because your head is tilted slightly upwards in the left and right side ones which "suggests" that your upper traps have shortened in length / are tight.

There's a definite difference from side to side in your shoulders if you check the back pics and hand position. Also check your knees, your left knee is slightly externally rotated compared to the right, which is really your left femur that is externally rotated so that issue originates at the hips. So a definite left side dominance as you have stated, also with the lean to the left.

Biggest things for me is the side to side imbalance. Also, there's an anterior pelvic tilt (your hips tilt forward) and the upper back is rounded forward as well (kyphosis).

All very typical and common. As other people have stated, the human body is never perfectly symmetrical. Pictures don't allow us to see exactly what little discrepancies are natural and what ones are a concern (but do give us a great idea). Posture in movement is a much better analysis. But stick to the pictures for now and see what you can come up with.

RE the anterior pelvic tilt and rounded upper back - what this NORMALLY means is, from the ground up... tight / overactive ankles & calves, overactive quads.. weak hamstrings, glutes and lower back (posterior chain), weak abs / obliques, weak lower traps, middle traps, external rotators. Tight internal rotators, upper traps / levator scapulae.

Those imbalances are common in - probably - most of the population, so nothing should sound ground breaking. It translates to a tonne of posterior chain work, a tonne of mobility, and a tonne of soft tissue work. The posterior chain thing is the biggest thing. With the side to side imbalance, you just need to do a tonne of single leg stuff - lunges, loads of them, 1 leg dead lift variations, 1 arm rows etc until it balances itself out. Then you would go back to Deadlifts, squats etc

Some stretching, especially static, can actually make things worse, although you will need a lot of upper trap static stretching and hip stretches. In general, you don't need a lot of static stretching. Active recovery aside, static stretching is over rated but it has it's place.

LOL - i only meant to post these links just now, but there ya' go, I can't shut up about posture.

I would recommend highly that you read everything you can by these guys. I'm not saying anything else you've read is wrong, I just know from personal experience that this stuff works.

This is a guide, and not a quick fire answer. If you scan through the article series you will pic up some useful tips but it won't fix your posture. You need to study this and do what it tells you to. If i remember correctly, the first article is informative, geeky stuff. Next it will tell u to take pictures, tell you what to look for, lines etc to draw on them. They tell you to write colums i.e. "kyphosis" and will say things like "if this part does this, put a tick in the kyphosis colum. And you end up with lot's of things that you need to work on. it will then show you how to put into a program. It's quite heavy going but unbelievable info to get for free.

Admittedly I've not read the rest of your posts yet, just looked at the pics quickly and posted so I will come back later on and read through everything. I'm not saying I could fix it all but I have fixed my own posture and can provide loads of tried and tested info, mainly by the guys below.

Neanderthal No More - Eric Cressey and Mike Robertson
http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do?article=314nean2
http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do?article=315nean2
http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do? ... 4-training
http://www.t-nation.com/findArticle.do? ... 6-training
http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=535872

KPj

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Post by caangelxox » Sat Jan 05, 2008 3:00 am

By saying load of lunges - do you mean load of lunges for my left leg right (the back leg being worked in the lunges)? and I should do load of oblique/rotational work for my left side and weak rotational side too right?

Should I not work my strong side at all right now and just focus on my weak side for the strength training.....and no I don't do static stretching. I do dynamic stretches and PNF stretching using my own bodyweight, wall, rope, or floor. (passive, isometric, then passive again, then I go to the next muscle)

BTW did you ever have one leg longer than the other before?

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Post by KPj » Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:35 am

caangelxox wrote:By saying load of lunges - do you mean load of lunges for my left leg right (the back leg being worked in the lunges)? and I should do load of oblique/rotational work for my left side and weak rotational side too right?

Should I not work my strong side at all right now and just focus on my weak side for the strength training.....and no I don't do static stretching. I do dynamic stretches and PNF stretching using my own bodyweight, wall, rope, or floor. (passive, isometric, then passive again, then I go to the next muscle)

BTW did you ever have one leg longer than the other before?
Erm... I've got a bad habit of making things sound like they are way more than they actually are.

All you need to do is tailor your program to your posture, but still work towards your goals.

By loads of lunges, I mean at least a couple of exercises per week. Which has made me realise that I don't even know what your training for....

What are your goals?

on that note - have you had any previous injurys?

If you don't mind me asking, and without sounding cheeky - why do you do the PNF stretching? I don't know much about it, admittedly, just wondering why you would do it.

If I knew your goals or even your program I could give you more specific info.

Also, train both sides, just do the weak side first and don't do any more reps on the strong side. Or any more weight, obviously. So really your pushing one side and holding back on the other, but still training both.

Single Leg dead lifts sound like a great option for you to do. You need more posterior chain (as most do). I know you said in a previous post that your balance is all over the place - this is only more of a reason to do them!

You should prioritise getting your sides balanced and hitting the poster chain. Use the same principle in everything - weak side first. if single leg DL's are far too difficult, try suitcase dead lifts, they're probably a bit easier, but I guess it depends on the individual.

I've never "had" one leg longer than the other. It's actually very uncommon and difficult to diagnose. You can't just look at your thighs and tell, you need to go to a specialist. Most of the time this is actually a case of one hip being more tilted than the other, which makes one hip sit a little higher which gives the illusion of a longer leg.

If you did by chance have one leg longer than the other, you need to get orthotics put in your footwear to lift the shorter leg - i've not heard of any other solution and I don't even think orthotics get rid of the problem - just improves it but I could be wrong.

KPj

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Post by TimD » Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:38 am

Caang, I've stayed out of this so far, but I do have one leg longer than the other, however, it isn't bone lengths. My right side of the hip has curved upwards due to osteoarthritus, overcompensation from a partially clubbed foot, etc. I have mine in check right now with special orthopedic shoes (not cheap),but it sounds like you've already discussed this with a chiro. Go to him and whatever other specialist he / she may recommend and get some type of game plan going. BTW, you don't look like you're all that out of balance. In your case, to prevent whathas happened with me, get professional guidance.
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Post by caangelxox » Mon Jan 07, 2008 2:48 pm

KPj wrote:
caangelxox wrote:By saying load of lunges - do you mean load of lunges for my left leg right (the back leg being worked in the lunges)? and I should do load of oblique/rotational work for my left side and weak rotational side too right?

Should I not work my strong side at all right now and just focus on my weak side for the strength training.....and no I don't do static stretching. I do dynamic stretches and PNF stretching using my own bodyweight, wall, rope, or floor. (passive, isometric, then passive again, then I go to the next muscle)

BTW did you ever have one leg longer than the other before?
Erm... I've got a bad habit of making things sound like they are way more than they actually are.

All you need to do is tailor your program to your posture, but still work towards your goals.

By loads of lunges, I mean at least a couple of exercises per week. Which has made me realise that I don't even know what your training for....

What are your goals?

on that note - have you had any previous injurys?

If you don't mind me asking, and without sounding cheeky - why do you do the PNF stretching? I don't know much about it, admittedly, just wondering why you would do it.

If I knew your goals or even your program I could give you more specific info.

Also, train both sides, just do the weak side first and don't do any more reps on the strong side. Or any more weight, obviously. So really your pushing one side and holding back on the other, but still training both.

Single Leg dead lifts sound like a great option for you to do. You need more posterior chain (as most do). I know you said in a previous post that your balance is all over the place - this is only more of a reason to do them!

You should prioritise getting your sides balanced and hitting the poster chain. Use the same principle in everything - weak side first. if single leg DL's are far too difficult, try suitcase dead lifts, they're probably a bit easier, but I guess it depends on the individual.

I've never "had" one leg longer than the other. It's actually very uncommon and difficult to diagnose. You can't just look at your thighs and tell, you need to go to a specialist. Most of the time this is actually a case of one hip being more tilted than the other, which makes one hip sit a little higher which gives the illusion of a longer leg.

If you did by chance have one leg longer than the other, you need to get orthotics put in your footwear to lift the shorter leg - i've not heard of any other solution and I don't even think orthotics get rid of the problem - just improves it but I could be wrong.

KPj
My goals are to improve my posture, get my left leg to be the same size as my right leg before I do anymore 2 legged work (would make me look taller too), improve my strength for softball, and improve my flexibility. I have never been injured before and I do PNF stretching because static stretching has never worked for me. PNF stretching using either the wall, my own bodyweight and the floor.....is working for me.

BTW when I visit the chiropractor, he is able to make my left leg the same as as the right; however, it soon goes shorten again. I don't know why it does. and also my right QL is tight

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Post by KPj » Tue Jan 08, 2008 5:30 am

BTW when I visit the chiropractor, he is able to make my left leg the same as as the right; however, it soon goes shorten again. I don't know why it does. and also my right QL is tight
It's a little tricky trying to comment on it when I can't see what's going on. If your bone length is fine, and your Chiro is able to even out the hips / legs, then what you need to do is find out what compensation pattern is occurring. Sounds like a case of treating the symptom and not the cause - not that it's a Chiro's job of course, i'm just saying (no sarcasm intended).

Why don't you brainstorm with your chiro to determine the cause? You may as well get the most out of your sessions...

However, if an overactive QL is the cause, then you should go with Tony Gentilcores recommendations. Do you have a foam roller? Even a tennis ball? Both would be best...

He states that the TFL/IT Band is tight and causes the QL to compensate. So you need to work on it - this is easily one of the most painful areas to foam roll when you've not done it before. I've not seen anyone get on a foam roller for the first time and not hate this one, actually, so it's very common for this to be tight.

He also recommends strengthening the glute medias. Most people need that. Do you have bands? Do you know what X-band walks are?

I found this blog post from Eric Cressey
http://ericcressey.blogspot.com/2007_04_01_archive.html

It almost specifically mentions what your issue may be, and falls in line with Tony Gentilcores recommendations (they do work together, btw)...
Fixing the Flaws: Poor Frontal Plane Stability at the Hips

Frontal plane stability in the lower body is dependent on the interaction of several muscle groups, most notably the three gluteals, tensor fascia latae (TFL), adductors, and quadratus lumborum (QL). This weakness is particularly evident when an athlete performs a single-leg excursion and the knee falls excessively inward or (less commonly) outward. Generally speaking, weakness of the hip abductors – most notably the gluteus medius and minimus – is the primary culprit when it comes to the knee falling medially, as the adductors, QL, and TFL tend to be overactive. However, lateral deviation of the femur and knee is quite common in skating athletes, as they tend to be very abductor dominant and more susceptible to adductor strains as a result.

In both cases, closed-chain exercises to stress the hip abductors or adductors are warranted; in other words, keep your athletes off those sissy obstetrician machines, as they lead to a host of dysfunction that's far worse that the weakness the athlete already demonstrates! For the abductors, I prefer mini-band sidesteps and body weight box squats with the mini-band wrapped around the knees. For the adductors, you'll have a hard time topping lunges to different angles, sumo deadlifts, wide-stance pull-throughs, and Bulgarian squats
As with most common imbalances that I seem to read about, it comes down to the same principle - more posterior chain work and more single leg work.

Sounds to me like you should try the following (just concluding the 2 links really),

1. get a foam roller & tennis ball if you don't already and work on your whole lower body, namely hip region and especially TFL/ITband.

2. Static Stretch Hip Flexors

3. Isolate & strengthen the Glute medius via x-band walks

4. Strengthen the posterior chain, but most notably the glutes / hip region via a combination of dead lift and lunge variations.

I don't know much about PNF stretching at all, but it sounds like a similar principle to static stretching. What makes you think your inflexible? If your going to go with the above authors / coaches recommendations, you should know that they recommend static stretching only in certain muscles or situations, specific to the individual. It's generally thought that static stretching is very overrated. Dynamic stretching is where it's at. I guess what i'm trying to say, without trying to offend anyone is that you should drop the PNF stretching if you are going to follow those recommendations. Only static stretch what they recommend (hip flexors) and almost exclusively do dynamic movements to increase flexibility - not to mention stability.

Again, don't be put off your goals by common postural flaws. This is one reason so called 'functional training' gets a bad rap, because people realise they have an imbalance and then drop everything and do nothing but try and fix it. Imbalances are very common, you need to learn to work around them and fix them at the same time - this is why 'cookie cutter' training programs don't work for everyone.

If you see the solution recommeded by Cressey - Sumo deadlifts, lunges, pull throughs (basically a DL with a cable), split squats, box squats (starting body weight with mini band round knees to learn proper form/function) - it's not exactly limited, in terms of what you can achieve with it.

KPj

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Post by caangelxox » Tue Jan 08, 2008 1:15 pm

I have asked my chiro before about why things pop or whatever and he says my body is just adjusting and that every session I am improving. I asked about I can stop the leg that keeps shortening up from doing that and he says to me that my body takes a while to adjust after being in poor posture all my life and that after each session I am getting better and that nothing is coming out of place and a sound I hear doesnt mean anything and that my body is just adjusting to the new posture. What do you think about this? I am seeing him friday and I am going to try and explain better about my one leg keeps shortening up and getting shorter than the other and see what I should do to keep it from doing that. My mom won't let me see him more than once a month because of distance. The insurance pays for the session though (the reason why I am even seeing him. If the insurance did not pay for it, I would not be going there at all).



I have a softball, foam roller, tennis ball, etc and I am focusing on rolling my butt right now. after my leg workout yesterday, my left glute is sore, so thats a good thing that my left side was working. I was doing one legged work and more focusing on my left leg. one legged squat (sitting on a low bench and then coming up with my left leg), one legged RDL (not with my back leg straight, but bent because I get more balance that way), and I also did a different kind of one legged squat where I am bent over and my leg thats not on the ground is in back of me kind of like a deadlift position

What is the proper way to roll my upper trapz? should I start from the levator scapulae (where my neck starts) and then roll my way down as tension is releasing (next to my spine of course)? I tried that once, but then the tightness started up again later on and plus right after I did t, I still was not able to turn my head to the left side fully (something still blocking it)

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Post by KPj » Wed Jan 09, 2008 6:08 am

What do you think about this
Well, the Chiro is a pro so I would be inclined to take his word for it more than mine. I would of thought that he would be able to at least give you an idea of what muscles he thinks are 'shutting down' which in turn will cause your QL to be overactive - if a tight QL is the main symptom.

Maybe questions like, 'why is it tight?', or 'what would cause it to be tight?' or even 'what can I do outside of treatment to help?'. I know some Chiros will also specialise or have a particular interest in strength training, soft tissue work etc so you may be lucky and have someone like that - although you would probably know this by now.

It does take a while for posture to be 'fixed'. Depends how old you are and how severe your imbalances are. It's a mental challenge as well, a battle of will power. As well as a good exercise program, you need to consciously be aware of your posture 24/7. There's no other way. The perfect program won't fix anything if your in bad posture for the other 23 hours of the day.

I'm 9-10 months on from when my rehab started. Everything feels great but to be honest, i don't know if my posture is actually fixed yet, or if i'm just holding myself in good posture all of the time so it will always appears fixed. There was a time when it was painful to be in good posture, and I will always be conscious of it, so I think this could be as good as it gets.

Regardless of whether the chiro will give you the info you want, it's always helpful to pick the brains of a professional.

The physio I had for my issues was pretty much against weight training. She even said, and I hasten to say it, "i don't believe squats are a good exercise". If she didn't have her thumbs digging aggressively into my shoulders at the time, I may have got angry. But wincing in pain was good enough for me at the time. However, she was a great physio. it took allot but I didn't hold the squat comment against her. I actually told her about this site and advised she read the squat analysis.

Anyway, she was good for lot's of reasons, despite being against everything I believed - She got rid of the pain which is always good. Most of all though, she told me loads of information about the rotator cuff, shoulder blades and posture in general which was priceless as it allowed me to carry on learning between sessions and follow up with questions - they're job isn't to teach you, but you've got to try and get your moneys worth?

After getting so much conflicting info, you start to get an instinct as to what you want to take in and what you want to ignore. You'l start to notice the similarities in differing opinions, instead of being frustrated at the differences, but you've got to ask the questions in the first place.
What is the proper way to roll my upper trapz?
The one down side to foam rolling is that you can't effectively roll all of your muscles. The upper body is the most restriced, you can get to your lats, posterior shoulder, pecs and you can roll your upper back, middle & lower traps etc, but it doesn't feel very effective to be honest - if you do this, make sure to 'hug' yourself, if that makes sense, to get your shoulder blades out the way. If you think you can work your upper traps yourself then go for it, but really, you need some one to manually work on them. Y

You could try getting your mom or someone to do it, just tell them to be as brutal as possible, but you will find she will be fatigued after a few minutes and give up - when getting soft tissue work done by a pro, they will use thumbs, hands, elbows, and press there whole bodyweight into your muscles - it's pretty tough actually, but well worth it.

Do you know static stretches for upper traps & levator scapulae?

BTW, RE single leg DL - You don't need a straight leg, just a stiff leg. You can bend your leg enough as to let you complete the movement with a straight or arched back. A straight leg will more than likely cause rounding in the lower back. Some old timers will say that's OK, it may be the case (although I doubt it), I just don't like to take the chance with it.

KPj

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Post by KPj » Wed Jan 09, 2008 10:55 am

I have a softball, foam roller, tennis ball, etc and I am focusing on rolling my butt right now
Focus on the whole hip area. The tennis ball is much more effective for glutes but it's good and sometimes necessary to start with the foam roller.

REALLY focus on TFL/ITBand - outer part of your upper leg, rolling from practically the side of your glutes all the way down to the knee.

Adductors as well - inner thigh, rolling from top of inner thigh right down to the knee - close to the knee is probably where you find most adhesions / knots.

Hip flexors - quite tricky to find them (was for me anyway), but dig around and externally rotate the hip that your not rolling, it should expose more of it.

Glutes - Make sure you work the tennis ball into the side of your glutes, if that makes sense, sort of... towards the outer part - should find some interesting adhesions here. To get to the spot properly, it may require some leaning to the side. Be cautious not to let your whole body weight sit on the ball at first. What your really trying to get to is the 'piriformis'... Don't be alarmed if your head shoots through the roof.

If your gong to priotise any muscles over any other muscles, i would advise prioritising all of the above. You only need the tennis ball for Piriformis.

Other than that, a few tips on other lower body muscles...

Quads - Remember with any of this, you should progress onto one leg at a time, and then you stack the other leg on top of the one your doing to make it a little more intense. With quads, roll with the leg straight, and then do it with the leg bent - it exposes some other areas of the muscles, and more adhesions to get rid of.

Calves - One for the tennis ball, best advice is don't neglect any part of it. You basically want to hit the whole 'rear lower leg' if that makes sense.

In general, I would say frequency matters more than thoroughness. If you've got lots of knots, you could spend all day foam rolling and sometimes you can do more harm than good. If you give everything a decent going over at least every other day you should notice a very pleasant difference in 2-3 weeks...

One thing I do, as I usually don't have as much time as I would like, is roll as heavy as I can, about an inch at a time, stopping breifly on knots or 'hot spots', work them for 20-30 seconds, and continue. I might do that twice, but sometimes just once then on to the next muscle. I do my whole lower body and some of my upper body in 10 minutes this way, but it was longer to start with.

I've messed around with foam rolling, just on my own body though (so reference = 1). For me, doing 4 quick 'once over' sessions per week is definitely more effective than one very thorough session per week.

KPj

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Post by caangelxox » Thu Jan 10, 2008 2:10 am

when I find a knott, I hold it until it releases and then move an inch down the muscle again and hold. I have been focusing on my glutes and glute medius and pirformis. Anything below that on the side of my leg, I dont feel anything unless I turn over towards my stomach more for the hip flexors and quads.

Foam rolling used to work for my hips, glutes, and quads, but doesn't really work for that anymore. I have to use either a softball or a tennis ball to find the knotts in my glutes and hips. When I roll over the abductors with anything, I feel nothing..so there is no reason to roll there. I do feel something in between the quads and abductors, but I think thats all considered the quad. I dont feel anything on the abductor itself when I roll on the side of my legs.

By the way - how exactly do you roll the glutes? I am doing something wrong when I try to roll them (I dont exactly roll, but I go on a tight spot until it releases then moves on..maybe I am doing something one with the glutes/glute medius where nothing releases. there are a few spots that are too painful to hold onto with a lot of pressure. Unless I actually sit on the spot leaning to the side a little bit, I don't really feel anything. when I lift up my legs, I can really feel it and feels like I want to just stop doing it.

I was able to roll out the quads with my softball starting from my hip flexors up to my knee (the area right above my knee was the most painful, but the knott or scar tissue released and my legs feel good. I just rolled them out right before making this reply. I keep the ball or whatever object I am using on the painful spot until theres no pain at all and then I move an inch more and so on. After I did the foam rolling, I did stretching for my quads/hip flexors.

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Post by KPj » Thu Jan 10, 2008 4:48 am

Foam rolling used to work for my hips, glutes, and quads, but doesn't really work for that anymore
that's what I mean by frequency... If you quickly go over all these areas, even if you don't find any knots, chances are that they will stay reasonably knot free... If you leave them then it's only a matter of time before some knots accumulate.

Remember, all foam rolling (and massage) really does other than physically ironing out the knot is increase blood flow to the muscle your rolling - that can never hurt and is the reason why it's great to foam roll pre warm up or as part of your warm up... You will be doing some good even if your not working on big painful knots... You still have less obvious adhesions and scar tissue which will build up from normal everyday wear and tear, or wear and tear from training you do.. It will still loosen you up, even if it your not tortured in the process - this is a much better / healthier position to be in...

Some people get addicted to the pain though... I've ordered the 'foam roller plus' which is foam wrapping around a PVC pipe - so it will make the actual foam roller a bit more firm and less likely to soften... and if i decide that I really hate myself, I can take the PVC pipe out and roll on that :-)

You can also progress from tennis ball to Lacrosse ball to baseball if you hate yourself too... OK maybe not hate yourself, but the tennis ball isn't the best to be honest, too soft. But perfect to start with.
By the way - how exactly do you roll the glutes?
I started doing it with the foam roller because it was very painful even like that. But I use a Lacrosse ball now (previously tennis ball). I don't really feel anything except when I go for the piriformis, which seems to require alot of work to keep it at bay. But I quickly go over the whole glute area, pressing all my weight on to it, then focus on piriformis.
there are a few spots that are too painful to hold onto with a lot of pressure
These are the ones you want to really focus on. You don't need to knock your self out though. Just do what you can handle for 30ish seconds then move on. Eventually it won't be as sore, and one day you will be able to really press into and it will go away - these ones are the best to get rid of. The kind that make you perform a victory run around the gym when you get rid of them.

Some knots will just not budge even after a few sessions - much like if you get a pro to work on you. If you have serious issues, they will not be able to get rid of your knots first time. Again, this is the importance of doing it regularly.
After I did the foam rolling, I did stretching for my quads/hip flexors.
Foam rolling is meant to be great pre stretching... Just about everytime I train, its like this - foam rolling, static stretch for the hips (1, maybe 2) hten around 10 dynamic movements. Even if i'm feeling really tired before going to the gym, by the time Ive done this, I'm fired up ready to go. Can't beat it.

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Post by caangelxox » Thu Jan 10, 2008 4:55 pm

thanks. The only way the knott can go away if I just let the pain do its thing and then the pain will get less. the only way the knott can not go away is if I just not let the pain do its thing like I have been doing on my glutes. the knott is not exactly on the areas I sit on, but if I lean over on my right glute towar the side of my glute, I will feel the knott sitting on it. Even if its really painful, I have to do what I gotta do to get rid of it.

I also have big knotts in my triceps (very painful), but their the easiest to just lay on the ball becuase I just have to lay on my side and let my arms sink in. Also I can put my head on my biceps for more pressure in them too. Both triceps have really big knotts in and after I was rolling last night in bed, my fingers and arms felt a little numb and then went away soon after. Also, my forearms feel a little tight as well because my triceps are attached. The knott came back right away though when I thought I was done. I know that like I did with the foam roller, it will soon go away completly. Using a tennis ball is just the next step after a foam roller. I could of rolled longer last night and kept doing it until the knotts stopped coming back for that session of rolling, but I wanted to sleep and I knew that it would take at least 30 minutes to get a knott out of my glutes or triceps if I just try and ignore the pain and do the best I can to just think about something else while the ball and muscle is doing its thing releasing.

Speaking of knotts...the pain feels different on every muscle I do. For the upper trapz, I know they are really tight, but I don't feel any pain at all. Just a little tension feeling, so I don't know if the tightness has gone away or not really. maybe I should go from a tennis ball to finding a ball around my room that is a lot harder and a little smaller than a tennis ball.

My main focus right now is the whole glutes and pirformis and glute medius, and the triceps. Triceps are probably from softball or something.

Onlyethic
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KPj, please

Post by Onlyethic » Sun Jan 13, 2008 7:36 am

I'm going to jump in to this-- thought about starting a new thread, but my questions are very related so...

KPj-- Read your posture comments and went over the T-Nation links (I admit, not very well, but I realized there is too much background info I don't know for me to jump into those without some prior reading).

I looked in the mirror, front-wise and profile, after reading all this. I discovered to my shock and amazement, that I'm nearly a knuckle-dragger:

Meaning, my palms are not completely back-facing in a relaxed posture, but they're on the way. My shoulders are partially rounded, not terribly, but feels more as if they're being pulled downward.

And, my right arm is slightly longer than the left (though this might be unrelated).

I often have hip pain (discomfort, really) just from walking, and notice that walking, and even standing, my weight displaces outward, causing my feet to roll out, as if my legs are trying to be bow-legged.

I also have a very hard time sitting up straight. Seems as if that's a midback weakness.

I know that I have posterior chain weakness-- especially in hamstrings and lower back. Not as sure what's going on up top, though: I have a relatively easy time with push exercise (bench press) and am also quite strong an top-heavy pulls (pull ups). Things like bent over rows kills though.

I might be answering my own question here, but wanted to here what you think. I might get some posture photos done quickly to get a better assessment.

Thank muchly

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Post by pdellorto » Sun Jan 13, 2008 8:13 am

If you've got posture questions, you can always ask Eric Cressey and Mike Robertson directly here:

http://www.t-nation.com/tmagnum/readTop ... 2&pageNo=0

I asked them a couple questions on that thread, too. They aren't fast to answer, but it is free advice...


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