Stretching: Good or Bad?

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Post by stuward » Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:24 am

Jungledoc, I'll pitch in on a couple of your questions.

1. 1 leg RDL is a Romanian Deadlift on 1 leg. It's not pictured in the database but it's done holding a dumbbel or 2, straight back, working leg slightly bent and the free leg allowed to swing to the rear.

2. I also do OH squat as part of every warmup. I use a broomstick and it's more than of a dynamic stretch than an exercise. Sometimes I follow it with a 45# bar or heavier but then it's part of my conditoning phase and I rotate exercises there.

3. Kpj can probably explain this better than me.

4. Bridges are another gap in the database. Here is a side bridge from another site: http://www.myfit.ca/exercisedatabase/vi ... ises&ID=98

Stu


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Post by TimD » Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:26 am

Hi Jungledoc. Here is the RDL
http://jva.ontariostrongman.ca/RL.htm
For the one leg version, I just shoot my right leg back, balance on my left and go back and down.
Overhead squats: When I use them as part of my program I'll go up close to bodyweight, however, in a warm up, I use my6 ft breaker bar which is give or take 20 lbs. You could use a wooden dowel/rod, but I like having a little weight, it helps me keep correct balance. I'll do a se or two with this to loosen upthen a set or two with the reg Oly bar, empty. I usually do this every morning Doc, and /or before a workut. I'm one of the geezer's on this board, and have some pretty nasty arthritus in my right hip, and it loosens things up where I can walk comfortably, but if someone is just wanting overall core/shoulder girdle stability/hip ankle flexibility, it sure wouldn't hurt to use a dowel or empty bar5-7 times /wk. It's not like there's a lot of loading involved.

I'll leave the foam rolling to KPJ, I know he has a link for you
Front bridge. Lie face down on a mat. Keep pressure on your forehead while walking your feet closer in to your face. Your face, chest and stomach will come up off the mat, forming a "Bridge" and your weight will be supported by your feet and head. Back bridge, just the reverse. Start face up on the mat. Side bridge, just roll over on your side. You can look it up on any wrestling site. It's a common exercise.
Tim

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Post by KPj » Thu Mar 27, 2008 10:28 am

KPJ, interesting to note the 1 leg RDL for picking things up off the floor. Ha. I've got arthritus in the right hip, and thats about the only way I pick things up off the floor these days. Good hear I'm not alone.
lol, the only problem i've had with this is kicking people with the back leg! The k-word in my workplace is pretty small, and the heating system is loud so you don't hear people coming up behind you.
You know I disagree about avoiding lumbar flexion at all costs, and so do many coaches, we'll leave that one alone.
Yes... I did expect some response to that which is why I posted the newsletter and referenced Dr McGill. I know we've discussed this before but in the interest of balance I thought I should comment that there is plenty of good reason to believe lumbar flexion is OK. My personal opinion is simply 'why risk it' as you know. The McGill research as far as I know is quite recent, as with most of the 'anti lumbar flexion' stuff.

Although, my statement of 'avoiding it at all costs' admittedly was a bit drastic.

KPj

p.s I'll just dig out the foam rolling stuff and post separately.

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Post by KPj » Thu Mar 27, 2008 10:56 am

Jungledoc wrote: 3. KPj, what is "foam rolling"?
Foam rolling is a form of soft tissue work i.e. massage. Don't know if you've ever had a sports massage, but they're quite different from a normal, nice, relaxing enjoyable massage. With a sports massage, they find knots in your muscles and basically dig everything from their thumbs to their elbows in to try and get rid of the knot. It's quite painful - if you have lots of knots - but you feel amazing afterwards. The pains addictive, too.

Foam rolling is a poor mans sports massage. Instead of paying someone to do it, you buy a foam roller - big stick of hard foam. You lie on them with your body weight and roll up and down them, when you find knots, you stay on them and apply as much pressure as you can, rocking back and forth. The knot is gone when the pain subsides, which feels amazing. Foam rolling also gets rid of general adhesions and scar tissue which accumulate in muscles with general use / wear and tear.

These articles are great. Read both of them, first one has an actual foam roller, the second one is using a tennis ball. You could get a tennis ball and try stuff straight away - all you need to do is try it and you'll see how effective it is.

Foam rolling is very effective for your lower body in general. It's quite restricted in terms of what you can target in the upper body, but you can still cover a lot - lats, pecs, erectors, rear shoulder (very sore). I advise the tennis ball for your feet (plantar fascia), calves, glutes, rear shoulder. And foam roller for everything else.. Tennis ball might be too painful at first though...

Feel Better for 10 Bucks
by Eric Cressey and Mike Roberstson
http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=475832

Soft Tissue Work for Tough Guys
by Tony Gentilcore
http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1259323


KPj

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Post by ironmaiden708 » Thu Mar 27, 2008 11:08 am

1. Hip Mobility (including regular static stretching) - Amazing things happen when you loosen up the hips. You could hit the nail on the head and get Magnificent Mobility.
2. Ab / core and glute strength (to stop the need for compensation by the erectors). Think dead lifts, squats, over head squats, even reverse crunches, bar rollouts.. Isometric strength - front side bridges.
These two I can see myself sticking to. I will start with my stretching today. Dealifts or squats tomarrow.


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Post by corless319_ » Thu Mar 27, 2008 11:33 am

ironmaiden i can tell you right now that dead lifts are amazing for flexibility after a deal lift workout i can more than touch my toes you want flexibility in the hamstrings. And back <--- not too sure about back but I could touch the ground its awesome.

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Post by KPj » Thu Mar 27, 2008 11:39 am

I found this article, so something for you to try before DL day.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ss27.htm

It has a "supine bridge" in it. A friend of mine calls them 'butt clenchers' lol.

Would be interesting to know if it made an immediate difference doing the following... Static Stretch your hip flexors before your warm up for a good 15-20 seconds per side. Then do some supine bridges, all you need is 10-12 reps, make sure your lumbars don't compensate (focus on squeezing the glutes). If you put your hands on your quads it will stop the hams pitching in as much, too. Do it slowly and don't let your butt touch the floor between reps... Then do what you normally do. What your doing is weakening the hip flexors and switching on the glutes (tuning up your CNS)... I've witnessed it make an immediate difference to squats with someone with poor flexibility would be curious to see if you felt it straight away with your DL issue.

Also, I know the foam rolling is a tough one to sell... One thing you could try without any hassle or expense is the toe touching test you just did with the straight back. Do it once and measure (even approximately) your ROM. The get a tennis ball, roll the bottom of your each foot for atleast a minute, quite a lot of pressure (should feel a little discomfort), get all of the bottom of your foot, especially the arch. Then try the toe touching thing again, I guarantee you'll get further and your hams will feel a lot less tight... (this is explained in the Soft Tissue for tough Guys article) Then think of how good it would be if you done that to all the muscles you can get too...

(I don't blame you for not diving into foam rolling.. Was just as reluctant myself)

KPj

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Post by Jungledoc » Fri Mar 28, 2008 8:03 am

KPj--When I was reading through this thread last night, I stopped and looked up some hip stretches and tried a few a couple of times each. My back actually started feeling better. Thanks. I'll start doing some of that and some overhead squats in my warm up, and work some bridging into my workout.

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Post by KPj » Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:05 pm

KPj--When I was reading through this thread last night, I stopped and looked up some hip stretches and tried a few a couple of times each. My back actually started feeling better. Thanks. I'll start doing some of that and some overhead squats in my warm up, and work some bridging into my workout.
That's great to hear. As well as the over head squats, Body weight lunges are great as well. It's all low impact so it doesn't interfere with anything. Overhead lunge walks are good, too (reach over head and do 10 walking lunges). Lateral lunges are great but can be quite challenging at first.

It's always the basic stuff that's the best :-)

KPj

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Post by KPj » Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:07 pm

Also, when doing these and, well... Just about anything, consciously tense your abs and keep your chest up. Enforces proper movement patterns, posture, and hip alignment (I guess these are all the same thing really).

KPj

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Post by TimD » Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:08 pm

Hey , KPJ, speaking of lunges and overhead squats, the crossfit types use something called the sampson stretch, which, if I read it correctly is an overhead split squat. I like it. loosens me up really well.
Tim

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Post by KPj » Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:25 pm

TimD wrote:Hey , KPJ, speaking of lunges and overhead squats, the crossfit types use something called the sampson stretch, which, if I read it correctly is an overhead split squat. I like it. loosens me up really well.
Tim
Just looked this up - I actually do this quite a lot, too, and really like it. It's in Magnificent Mobility and it's called a "Warrior Lunge".

KPj

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Post by amivan » Fri Mar 28, 2008 5:08 pm

It's also great as a serious lifting exercise :)

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Post by TimD » Fri Mar 28, 2008 6:24 pm

Yes, it is. When I originally learned O lifting, I used the split style. I ;earned the squat syle, but the older I get, the easier it is to go with the split. Much more control over the bar if the pull is off. The thing that impressed me most, was one of America's best ever heavy weights (Norb Schemansky) would snatch split syle, so deep that his back leg, being almost straight, that knee would only be about an inch or so off the ground.
Tim


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