When to up the weight?

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tostig
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Post by tostig » Wed May 14, 2008 11:57 am

Because I don't have a spotter, when I increase the weight I would initially work out backwards: 8/10/12. So in my last rep with the lightest weight, although my arms would be shaking, I know I would be able to complete it without the risk of it crashing down on me.

Then when I get adapted to that, I would switch back to normal: 12(lightest)/10/8reps (with the heaviest).


Manofsteel319
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Post by Manofsteel319 » Wed May 14, 2008 12:00 pm

do you lift at home? I'll always ask for a spotter although I have noticed one or two people be like wtf and do it anyways I tell them how I want to be spotted and all that its good stuff.

tostig
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Post by tostig » Wed May 14, 2008 12:28 pm

No, most of my workouts are at the gym with barbells (Squats, Deadlift, BO Row, Bench Press, etc). I do have dumbells at home, though.

I'm lightweight. My BMI is 20 (5'7" 128lb). I would get intimidated asking someone to spot me with the comparably lighter weights I am using. But between my doctor and I, I have shown significant improvements and we're happy with it (regardless of what the trainer during the fitness test commented).

Manofsteel319
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Post by Manofsteel319 » Wed May 14, 2008 12:43 pm

You are who you are and you should be happy with any gains that you make. If some ahole trainer downs you don't listen to him. I mean obviously he has valuable information but if anyone puts you down because your thin they're not worth your time. Do what YOU can and progress you can only get bigger and stronger and if thats your goal aim for it and get it.

Manofsteel319
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Post by Manofsteel319 » Wed May 14, 2008 12:45 pm

also really strong spotters are great cause they can make you work for a rep make sure if your goal is to lift with as much as you can make sure your spotter doesnt lift it all for you they are there to help you not hurt you.


tostig
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Post by tostig » Wed May 14, 2008 1:26 pm

Thanks for the encouragement. This site is one of the reasons for my progress: fundamentals, proper form, etc.

I've basically givenup on machines (except for Lat pulldowns as there are no barbell or dumbell exercises for lats).

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Post by Chris_A » Wed May 14, 2008 1:32 pm

tostig wrote:I've basically givenup on machines (except for Lat pulldowns as there are no barbell or dumbell exercises for lats).
Hold on!! :grin:

Bentover Barbell rows, Bent Dumbbell Rows, BB and DB pullovers....all of these are great for lats!

Manofsteel319
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Post by Manofsteel319 » Wed May 14, 2008 2:04 pm

Don't forget wide grip pullups really hitts the bi's and the lats. I need to work mine! haha :roll:

tostig
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Post by tostig » Wed May 14, 2008 2:49 pm

I get new exercises from this site:

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/exercises.htm

Those exercises (BO rows, Pullovers) work the main muscles along the spine (Rhomboids) with the Lats as secondary.

Fine, but I wanted to look for Lats as the Primary.

BTW, I've also been concentrating on my core and skipping my arm exercises. I guess with all the compound exercises I'm doing, my arms will take care of themselves.

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Post by Chris_A » Wed May 14, 2008 3:03 pm

BO Rows are a compound exercise that allows you to go really heavy, even without a spotter. If you fail, then weight just goes back to the floor. It’s a fantastic general back exercise that calls the lats into heavy play.

The Pullover is considered an isolation exercise that specifically targets the lats as the prime mover. As such, you can’t go as heavy, and strict concentration on form is paramount.

http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Lat ... lover.html

The Front Pulldown is a compound exercise with emphasis on the lats. I personally always do the BO Row first, then follow with the Pulldown.

EMG studies have shown that the Barbell Bent-over Row and the Single Arm Dumbbell Row stimulate the lats more than the Front Pulldown.

Latissimus dorsi (back)
Bent-over Bb rows ---------------------------93%
One-arm Db rows -----------------------------91
T-bar rows ----------------------------------89
Lat pulldowns to the front ------------------86
Seated pulley rows --------------------------83

http://www.myfit.ca/archives/viewanarti ... 20Activity

Matt Z
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Post by Matt Z » Wed May 14, 2008 3:31 pm

Is there even any consesis in the scientific community that EMG activity is a valid model?

Also, your tossing out numbers without any explanation of how the study was conducted, sets, reps, loading, grips, etc.

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Post by Chris_A » Wed May 14, 2008 3:40 pm

Matt Z wrote:Is there even any consesis in the scientific community that EMG activity is a valid model?

Also, your tossing out numbers without any explanation of how the study was conducted, sets, reps, loading, grips, etc.
The EMG (Electromyography) is a tried and trusted test of muscle activity. It is generally trusted and relied upon by Doctor’s and Physiologists the world over. As for the numbers, follow the link and read the article. Numbers for all exercises tested are given. I didn’t just toss them out there, but did a cut-n-paste of the pertinent data (lats).

The particular study that gathered those numbers that I tossed out were conducted by by Tudor O. Bompa, PhD & Lorenzo J. Cornacchia and was published in their book “Serious Strength Training” which is, by the way, advocated and for sale through this very site.

http://www.exrx.net/Store/HK/SeriousStr ... ining.html

Manofsteel319
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Post by Manofsteel319 » Wed May 14, 2008 3:42 pm

funny thing is matt that i feel that the emg tested decline dbell bench press is amazing. I don't know about you but if I do one rep and its hitting my pecs 93% I would assume all the other reps would be at that percentage or close. Althouh everyone knows compound lifting dead lifts squats and bench are really good for ya.

Manofsteel319
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Post by Manofsteel319 » Wed May 14, 2008 3:43 pm

So your saying bent over rows hit the lats? I don't feel it in the lats. Pullovers I would think hit the lats harder...hmmmm

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Post by Chris_A » Wed May 14, 2008 3:49 pm

Manofsteel319 wrote:So your saying bent over rows hit the lats? I don't feel it in the lats. Pullovers I would think hit the lats harder...hmmmm
I didn’t do that study, and like some others, I admit that I was a bit surprised that the BO Row hit lats harder than a Chin or a Pulldown. Still, the lats are a strong shoulder adductor, and when you go super heavy on a BO Row, you can imagine that the lats are working big time to move the weight.

But, as I said before, I follow the BO Row with a lat pulldown! :smile:


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