Weight Gain Rate

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Neb154
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Weight Gain Rate

Post by Neb154 » Wed Jun 18, 2008 5:51 pm

Two quick questions for the forum:

1) What is considered a "good rate" to be putting on weight?

2) And what is a "good ratio" of muscle to fat for this weight?

I am hoping to compare these answers to my own progress:

In the past 3.5 weeks I have put on 7.5 lbs through a combination Madcow's Intermediate 5x5 Plan and eating everything in sight (a little less healthy than usual, but not much). According to my at home body fat monitor / scale, 3.5 of this is muscle and 4.0 is fat.

I am not overly concerned with the exact numbers, as I know the scale is going to be off.

Thanks in advance.

Note: I was fairly skinny, though not incredibly so when I started, at 6'2" 178.5. I have also been lifting for awhile.


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Post by ironmaiden708 » Wed Jun 18, 2008 6:34 pm

1) 1-2 lbs of muscle in a month.
2) All muscle no fat.

Kenny Croxdale
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Re: Weight Gain Rate

Post by Kenny Croxdale » Thu Jun 19, 2008 7:58 am

In the past 3.5 weeks I have put on 7.5 lbs through a combination Madcow's Intermediate 5x5 Plan and eating everything in sight (a little less healthy than usual, but not much). According to my at home body fat monitor / scale, 3.5 of this is muscle and 4.0 is fat.
David Barr's "Big Bulking Tips" article is a good one.
http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=781428

As Barr notes in the article, your going to put on fat, "That's why it's called "bulking" and not "delicately adding lean mass."

Barr also states, "If you're adding fat too quickly then you need to analyze what you're doing and adjust accordingly."

If the 7.5 pound of weight you gained was fat, that means 53% of the weight you put on was body fat. That may or may not mean your adding body fat too quickly.

The "may or may NOT" is dependent on what your body fat percentage was at the start of your program.

Your being 6'2" 178.5 at the start of your program, lead me to believe you were pretty lean to begin with.

I agree with Barr's assment that, "most skinny guys can afford to put on a little fat." And 6'2" 178.5 put you in the skinny catagory.
I am not overly concerned with the exact numbers, as I know the scale is going to be off.
Yes, the scales and hand held body fat measuring devices are VERY inaccurate.

Kenny Croxdale

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Post by unexpected » Thu Jun 19, 2008 6:02 pm

Kenny, a little off topic but:

what do you think is the best way for the home user to measure their body fat? Not all of us have a hydrostatic chamber....

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Post by ironmaiden708 » Thu Jun 19, 2008 7:17 pm

Skin Caliper, most accurate and economical.


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Post by Kenny Croxdale » Thu Jun 19, 2008 9:10 pm

unexpected wrote:Kenny, a little off topic but:

what do you think is the best way for the home user to measure their body fat? Not all of us have a hydrostatic chamber....
Hydrostatic weighing is not as accurate as most think it is. Hydrostatic weighing is based on five cadavers that were cut up an measured. And none of those individuals was very healthy, thus their demise.

The reliability of data is based on big number. The greater the number of individuals in a study, the more likely the validity.

Five cadavers does not provide a very sound base...very small data base.

Calipers are based on the hydrostatic research of those five cadavers. So, that means skin calipers are very inaccurate.

What make skin calipers reading even more flawed is that the majority of calipers provide you with a "ball park" method of measuring an individual.

The exrx site provide you with some good information on how to use skin calipers. http://exrx.net/Calculators.html Click on "Body Composition."

A good technician can get a pretty good reading with a fairly cheap pair of callipers.

If the technician is not using a tape measure and marking on you with a pen, the precise palce to measure...they don't know what they are doing.

If you don't know what you are doing, you won't get a very good measurement.

Also, measuring youself and coming up with a good reading won't work.

If you absoolutely need to know what your body fat percentage is, locate a good technician. Good luck on that. There are a ton of idiots out there who think they know.

I am a proponent of the tape measure and a mirror. You won't know you body fat perecentage number but the majority of indivuduals who think they know their number, don't.

Kenny Croxdale

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Post by Jungledoc » Thu Jun 19, 2008 9:32 pm

How reproducible are skin-fold body fat determinations? How meaningful are serial determinations on the same individual?

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Post by unexpected » Fri Jun 20, 2008 10:09 am

What about those Bod Pods? I've located one in my area, and it's $20 to use.

I hate calipers, it's too easy to cheat, especially if you measure yourself.

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Post by Neb154 » Sat Jun 21, 2008 11:25 pm

Thanks a lot for your comments.

I think that I will keep eating for a caloric excess, though probably tone it down a little bit, and monitor how things go over the next two weeks or so. If I maintain the same muscle gain, with lower fat, then it'll have been a great success. Yet if I fail to gain muscle, then I'll probably know that I cut too much out.

Thanks again.

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Post by ironmaiden708 » Sun Jun 22, 2008 6:46 am

What about those Bod Pods? I've located one in my area, and it's $20 to use.
The most accurate to date would most likely be DEXA. Those bod pods are good but there are precautions you must take to get an accurate reading.
I hate calipers, it's too easy to cheat, especially if you measure yourself.
It's a $20 peice of equiptment. You are welcome to use other cheaper and less accurate devices.
Last edited by ironmaiden708 on Sun Jun 22, 2008 10:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Kenny Croxdale » Sun Jun 22, 2008 8:02 am

unexpected wrote:What about those Bod Pods? I've located one in my area, and it's $20 to use.
I am not very familiar with the Body Pod. However, I would question the accuracy of it along with hydrostatic and calipers.
I hate calipers, it's too easy to cheat, especially if you measure yourself.
I don't believe it is a case of cheating so much as not having the training and hand on experience to take an accurate measurement.

And no matter how much experience you have, one cannot take their own body fat percentage and obtain a very accurate measurement.

With that said, the best pair of inexpensive body fat calipers that I have seen are the Slim Guide that are sold on the exrx web site. http://www.exrx.net/Store/Other/SlimGuide.html

But again, the accuracy of the Slim Guide is dependent on the individual using them.

It like firing a rifle at a target. If the sites on the rifle are lined up correclty, the accuracy of hitting the target comes down to the shooter...or in the case of measuring ain individual's body fat percentage, how good the technician is.

A small mistake of miscalculating an individual's body fat percentage by 1-2% is huge. On a 200 lb person that would an individual would have 2-4 pounds more muscle and/or fat.

Kenny Croxdale

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Post by Ironman » Sun Jun 22, 2008 1:53 pm

It's really just suppose to give you a ballpark figure of how many pounds of fat you need to loose. But really you just stop when what you see in the mirror matches your goal.

There is some argument as to what different percentages look like. If one is right I have more fat, but I don't have to go as low. If the other is right I have less fat but have to go lower. Either way I have to lose the same amount of fat.


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