rollerblading...

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tyler
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rollerblading...

Post by tyler » Sun Jul 13, 2008 7:13 pm

Would u recommend this to someone over something say like, running or jump roping, because the fact they have had some serious sprained ankles? It seems like it would be safer as the rollerblades are pretty padded...


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Re: rollerblading...

Post by MrWonderful » Sun Jul 13, 2008 8:47 pm

tyler wrote:Would u recommend this to someone over something say like, running or jump roping, because the fact they have had some serious sprained ankles? It seems like it would be safer as the rollerblades are pretty padded...
Rollerblading is fine. But having bad ankles is no excuse for not doing your aforementioned activities if you enjoy them. Buy a pair of shoes that have ankles support e.g. high tops and continue running or jumpropeing. Or you could just work on your ankles strength.

When I sprained my ankle really bad I went to see a physical therapist about it. She said that when you have ankle injuries you ankle becomes inherently weaker even though after a couple of weeks you can run on it like normal. So after every ankle injury you are more susceptible to having more of them unless you properly rehab it, which mean strength training for your ankle.

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Stephen Johnson
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Re: rollerblading...

Post by Stephen Johnson » Sun Jul 13, 2008 9:00 pm

tyler wrote:Would u recommend this to someone over something say like, running or jump roping, because the fact they have had some serious sprained ankles? It seems like it would be safer as the rollerblades are pretty padded...
Rollerblading is a much lower impact form of cardio than running or jumping rope, which are high impact cardio exercises. Yet it has many of the same benefits as running (especially when done uphill). A good rollerblader can burn 500-700 calories per hour - which are fewer calories expended than running or jumping rope the same amount of time requires, but still a considerable amount.

If you have ankle trouble, you should have them checked out by a physician - preferably one who is sports-oriented. And you can twist your ankle while blading. But the short answer to your question is yes, rollerblading is a good way to get your cardio.

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Re: rollerblading...

Post by Jungledoc » Sun Jul 13, 2008 9:29 pm

MrWonderful wrote:So after every ankle injury you are more susceptible to having more of them unless you properly rehab it, which mean strength training for your ankle.
Rehab is half of the equation. Proper care of the acute sprain is the other half. People who insist on "playing through the pain" or continuing their usual activities without caring for the ankle are setting themselves up for further injury. If the ligaments are left lax, no amount of rehab will restore full stability to the ankle. It's important to use a support method that unloads the sprained ligament for 2 weeks, and then for several more weeks when walking on uneven ground, or doing sports that pose a danger of re-injury.

Wearing the support (including braces, high-tops, etc) is only a temporary measure while the ligaments are healing, and not a substitute for good rehab. Strengthening the ankle in all planes of movement, as well as proprioceptive exercises are important.

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Post by KPj » Mon Jul 14, 2008 3:34 am

I've had a couple of bad ankle sprains,(ruptured ligament) in my right ankle. That ankle has been the source of an injury in the opposite knee as well as pain in my lower back and hips, due to a big loss in mobility which I overlooked after the injury. Just waited until it was pain free and started lifting again as normal. I lost just over 3 inches of ROM in it, when it felt completely 'heeled'.

Not only that, if I don't work on mobilising it at least 4times a week, I lose mobility in it rapidly. It's been a real 'thorn in my side', to be honest.

It's obvious even now that there's loads of crap stuck in there (scar tissue ) and I still can't get it right. It locks up practically over night, when I mobilise it during my warm up, I increase mobility by about an inch, just by loosening it up. I've got it even now, and learned a lot of different ankle mobilisations in the process, but it still 'feels' restricted, and ROM in that ankle will probably always need to be a priority, or I'll just lose it again.

Point is, you need to get your ROM back before anything else. You may not have lost much if any, depending on how bad the sprain was, but it's worth checking.

Surrounding soft tissue quality is very important as well. If the ankle is lacking in ROM, get a tennis ball or baseball into your calves and the bottom of your feet and get rid of any knots you come across...

KPj


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Post by tyler » Thu Jul 17, 2008 12:26 am

How do you strengthen the ankle? What exercises would u recommend exactly for this? And about the ROM...i'm not sure if I quite understand what you are referring to/recommending...

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Post by tyler » Thu Jul 17, 2008 12:31 am

and what is proper rehab? As far I knew...it was ice, rest, elevation and compression. Correct me if I am wrong.

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Post by KPj » Thu Jul 17, 2008 5:20 am

tyler wrote:How do you strengthen the ankle? What exercises would u recommend exactly for this? And about the ROM...i'm not sure if I quite understand what you are referring to/recommending...
You need to let it heal properly. Ligaments and tendons are delicate when they've been damaged, they take longer to get better. You strengthen the ankle by strengthening the muscles around it. Probably most important is 'mobility' in the ankle joint i.e. the 'knees over toes' part. Although It can also move to either side / in circles. It's a joint designed for movement. A sprain will lock it up, temporarily (depends how bad the sprain is). A common method of restoring normal function quite soon after the injury, for example, is imagine writing the letters of the alphabet with your foot - the point is just to get it moving in the directions that it's supposed to move in.

The most common area your bound to lose that mobility is the 'knees over toes' range. Check the video below, it's 'Wall Ankle Mobilisations'. Test your ROM either side. Keep your weight on your heels, chest up, toes close to wall, and move the knees over the toes until your knee touches the wall - keep moving your foot back a centimeter or so until your heel starts to lift. Try and find the furthest away point that you can touch the wall without your heel lifting, and do both sides. It's likely that the side with the sprain will be significantly less. What you need to do is restore that ROM by doing the mobilisation in the video frequently. You should also feel both sides loosining up as you do the mobilisations.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaaU4EZpmE8

This should be enough for a typical sprain, it gets tricky when it's not. If there is a big difference from side to side, do 3 sets on the restricted side for every one on the good side. Be gentle with it, too, don't force anything.

Also, the sprain causes the loss in ROM. This makes you more vulnerable to future sprains but what it also does it makes you far more likely to experience injury further up your body when lifting, and especially if there's a big side to side discrepancy. If your aware of it now and take it seriously, you may never experience any of those potential issues 'down the line'.


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Post by KPj » Thu Jul 17, 2008 5:28 am

I was just going for my second coffee of the day there and the name of this article shot into my head like a flash back from a horrific accident.

The Ankle Paradox
http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=1941581

Certain aspects seem too faraway from the joint to matter that much. But nothings further from the truth. For example, it's likely that you can increase ROM in your ankle just by getting a tennis ball into your calves and bottom of your foot and working away at all the knots for a few minutes.

Just about everyones lower leg is way out of balance with the calves receiving far too much abuse and the Tibialis Anterior (front of shin) being very weak. Simply training the Tibialis Anterior and doing soft tissue work and stretching your calves can go a long way for healthy ankles and knees. I actually started taking this lower leg balance thing more seriously because of a knee injury but noticed positive results in my ankle, too.

Force absorption work and 'more bear foot stuff' are things I'm a big believer in, too.

KPj (yeh, i'm obsessed with ankles, too)

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Post by Jungledoc » Thu Jul 17, 2008 8:57 am

tyler wrote:and what is proper rehab? As far I knew...it was ice, rest, elevation and compression. Correct me if I am wrong.
RICE is acute care. First aid, really. The second part of good healing is a support that allows flexion/extension but controls lateral movement. It can be done with tape, but it is labor intensive, and requires a pretty knowledgeable person to do it. There are several commercially-made supporters that are easy to use, allow you to wear your regular shoes, and work very well. The support should be used until the ankle is pair-free, and then for risky activities until the strengthening and ROM are complete.


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