Fibromyalgia-Osteoarthritis and Joint Hypermobility Syndrome

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Jungledoc
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Post by Jungledoc » Fri Sep 26, 2008 7:08 am

First of all, this isn't nearly as bad a list as I expected from your original post. I just looked back and saw that you mentioned how many pills she takes per week. This really isn't a very meaningful thing to pay attention to. How many total medicines she takes may mean more. The NHS is very cost-conscious, which means that they use many older generic meds, many of which have short half-lives, and so must be taken more often. The first on on your list, for instance; she takes 21 pills per week, but if she were taking a newer, more expensive anti-inflammatory, she could take it only once a day, and she'd only be taking 7 per week. But the effects, either good or bad would (at least potentially) be about the same.

I don't see any glaring red flags on the list. None of the meds are necessarily bad.

I wouldn't stop more than one at a time. I'll mention which can or should not be stopped without tapering. If you stop a med, and the target symptoms get worse, well, then you know it's been helping. If your wife is no worse off without it, leave it off. Give it a couple of weeks before stopping another.

One thing to clarify is your use of the word "coeliac". I suspect there is a difference in the British and the American use of the term. The literal meaning is "of or relating to the abdominal cavity." We use it as short-hand of "celiac spru" which is a condition of sensitivity to gluten. A couple of the meds you use it with are laxitives, but a couple are not used as such commonly in the US. On your side of the pond, does "coeliac" mean the same as "laxitive" on ours?
Rik-Blades wrote:Dicloflex 50mg-one, three times a day (anti-inflammatory)
Don't know the brand name, but it sounds like diclofenac, one of the older anti-inflammatories. No one anti-inflammatory is necessarily any better than the others, but sometimes a particular one will work better for a person than another. If it's working well, leave it alone. Side effects are usually apparent, so if she's not having problems, leave it alone. If it's not working, ask to try a different one. If she's not sure if it's working or not, stop it for a couple of weeks. If she doesn't get any worse, it wasn't working very well. If she does get worse, then start it up again. No need to taper.
Rik-Blades wrote:Bisacodyl 5mg-one in the Morning-two in the Evening (Coeliac)
Stimulant laxative. Can lose effectiveness over time. No problem with stopping to see what happens. I wonder about two different stimulants at once.
Rik-Blades wrote:Clomipramine 50mg-two at Night (OCD)
Also used for chronic pain. Common side effects are dry mouth, sedation (which may be a good thing in some cases), can cause a little constipation. 100mg is a small dose. If it's working, and no side effects, I'd leave it alone. Otherwise, there are a number of newer meds that are very effective for OCD. OCD can be disabling, so this may be a much-needed med. If she stops it, she should taper. 50 mg for a week, 1/2 tab for a week, then off. Re-starting, reverse the order of the doses.
Rik-Blades wrote:Metoclopramide 10mg-one, three times a day (Coeliac)
I know this med well, use it a lot for various GI problems, but not very often for constipation. Very low in side effects. No need to taper.
Rik-Blades wrote:Senna 7.5mg-three in the Morning three in the Evening (Coeliac)
Another stimulant laxative. Same as above.
Rik-Blades wrote:Simeticone 100mg-one, three times a day (Coeliac)
Often used in the US in over-the-counter products for gasiness. A pretty mild product. No need to taper.
Rik-Blades wrote:Zamadol 50mg-two, three times a day (Pain)
I don't know this med, at least not under this name. Sorry.

In the laxatives, good possibilities are lactulose, polyethylene glycol and sorbitol. Just ideas. They are not expensive in the US, so they maybe on the formulary in the NHS.

I hope this helps.


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Post by jeffrerr » Fri Sep 26, 2008 7:22 am

Just having a look Jungledoc and Zamadol is Tramadol Hydrochloride, an Opiod analgesic! The benefits of being a Lead Clinicians PA is the latest BNF (British National Formulary) in your office!!!!

When I had the elbow break a couple of years ago I was taking Tramadol for pain for the first five or six days, it did give me a bit of bowel upset/diarrohea the first 2 days but fine after that. I would suggest talking to a local doctor before stopping this one as if she's been on it for a long time there could be withdrawal symptoms involved!

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Re: Fibromyalgia Osteoarthritis etc

Post by Newbie » Tue Nov 04, 2008 4:48 am

Hello

I am a 59 year old female and stumbled across this thread when looking for a solution for back pain/fibromyalgia osteoarthritis. Well maybe not a solution, but perhaps some moral support and/or advice. :lol:

Some years ago after a CAT scan, I was told I had scoliosis. It didn't present too many problems, although my hips would scream if I tried using a treadmill and I'd get lower backpain if I used an exercycle. Needless to say I gave up both activities and took up walking instead!

A couple of years ago I went to a physiotherapist for pain in my arms which was actually RSI/OOS. She, however, determined it was caused by my back and proceeded to manipulate my spine even after I told her I had scoliosis. After 2 treatments I decided I was never going back as I now had pain in my thoracic spine that I'd never had before and my arms and legs tingled. It took months to settle down and no way was I EVER going to go back for more help from anybody. Later on I requested a back xray and was told the discs were all normally spaced and the orthopaedic surgeon I saw told me that the pain I would have suffered was simply the pain anybody would experience after any arthritic joint was moved in any way. When I told him I was experiencing tingling and burning, he replied that it would be because of my long standing diabetes. Funny that I'd never had this problem before the manipulation! He also said that I didn't have scoliosis at all, that the curvature in my spine was considered 'normal'. Totally dissatisfied, I gave up and have had the odd Bowen Therapy treatment. It appears that I also have fibromyalgia which doesn't help anything!

A few weeks ago, feeling reasonably ok, I attempted some heavy duty spring cleaning. The result was that my back became painful and I was burning and tingling in far too many places! I took to my bed for some rest and then managed to lift something too heavy and ended up with what felt like nerve twinges in my groin. More rest and that pain went away and the burning and tingling is improving.

What I need to know is: Would osteoarthritis/age related disc degeneration cause these sypmtoms? The worst pain is in the thoracic area of my spine and is where the worst pain eventuated after the physiotherapy. I was scared witless that the physio had herniated a disc there and even now I don't want to believe this could be a possibility. It seems a complete waste of time talking to my doctor about it as I just get fobbed off with age related conditions, which it could well be of course. I was also told that no way could a manipulation herniate a disc. As this last flare up happened only recently, I know it will take time to settle down again, but sometimes it is difficult to bear this all alone. I am not so bad that I need painkillers.

I really don't know what kind of help I want, but just writing it out may have some cathartic value!

Many thanks for 'listening'.

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Post by Jungledoc » Tue Nov 04, 2008 5:40 am

Sorry to hear of your difficulties. This is a bit outside the focus of this forum, but I'll make a couple of brief comments. However, there may be other fora that are more focused on the type of concerns you mention.

I'm not familiar with the abreviation RSI/OOS, so I'm afraid I can't comment on this.

I suppose that symptoms could be caused by osteoarthritis and disc degeneration, but it sounds like a pretty complex set of symptoms. I can't really comment. I can't think of a point along the spinal cord where an injury could cause tingling in both arms and both legs at once.

This is something that you need to discuss with your own doctor. If he or she won't listen, then you need to get a different doctor. If, on the other hand, your doctor has listened and has attempted to do a thorough work-up (you started out by mentioning a CT scan!) and the eveluation has failed to show a physiologic basis for the symptoms, you need to try to find out if something deeper may be responsible for them. And I would hope that your doctor would help you find a way to do that as well.

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Post by stuward » Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:29 am

Jungledoc wrote: I'm not familiar with the abreviation RSI/OOS, so I'm afraid I can't comment on this.
http://www.rsi.org.au/whatis.htm
Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) and Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS)


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Post by stuward » Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:36 am

Whatever your condition, proper exercise can help stabilize the joints and reduce pain. You need to strt light and increase intensity in a reasonable manner. Your heavy spring cleaning was probably too much relative to your current condition. A proper strengthening program earlier probably would have prevented the problem.

Many people find arthritis limits what they can do with repect to exercise but my experience is that moving more and strengthing exercises has actually reduced the pain in my joints over time.

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Post by TimD » Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:50 am

First, Jungledoc is correct in that this is pretty much way above the scope of thise forum, but we are lucky to actually have a legitimate physician onboard (Jungledoc, he just doesn't play one on the forums-he's for real). It is a valid topic, even though we probably don't have the ability or knowledge to get into advanced treatment.

As Stu mentione in regards to arthritis, I have a real bad case, in my left hip, and it's degenerative.It aches just to roll over and get out of bed, and my ROM on my right side is worse than terrible. I also can't bear too much weight on the right side anymore. Squatting heavy weights went out the window when after it worsened 10 years ago when I was around 50. The right side basically just provides balance these days. Not a real problem though. Like Stu said, exercise is a must, for joint stability and to ease the pain. I have a bodyweight squatting and hip stretching routine I do every morning and prior to workouts. It loosens things up and really eases the pain. I would try some light stuff, but first thing you have to do is go to a personal physician and get checked out. Sounds like you need multiple opinions, as your symptoms seem to be very complicated. The Fibromyalgia ould complicate things as well, as it wasn't even recognized until very recently.

All that said, feel free to use this forum for support though. I know there are severalof us oldster's around that are dealing with arthritus/joint issues.
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Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue, Gluten

Post by Newbie » Tue Jun 30, 2009 11:48 pm

Hi Guys

It's a long time since I posted my first message in here and firstly I want to thank JungleDoc for replying to my post, which I now cannot find, of course! In that post I said that I was burning and tingling all over. Well I've come a long way since then (no thanks to any doctors I might add!) IN sheer desperation, I Googled fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue and found a very helpful site that suggested removing gluten from the diet. I decided I had nothing to lose, but really didn't think it would make any difference. How wrong can you be? After 2 days gluten free, my chronic fatigue simply disappeared and now only reappears if I accidentally ingest gluten. The awful burning I used to get, sometimes everywhere, other times just in my head has disappeared also.

I have done loads of research into gluten and gluten intolerance since then and I am staggered at the list of diseases and conditions an undiagnosed gluten intolerance can cause. The list is endless and gluten intolerance is responsible for almost every disease known to man some of which I've had since childhood. Gluten intolerance is massively underdiagnosed. Why doctors are not doing routine celiac disease and gluten intolerance tests amazes me. The conditions that can be and are caused by an underlying gluten intolerance range from acne, asthma, diabetes, thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, fibromyalgia, pancreatic insufficiency, multiple sclerosis, motor neurone disease, IBS, Crohn's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Addison's Disease, psoriasis, schitzophrenia, sinus infections, GERD, weight problems, osteoporosis, lupus etc etc. People have cured themselves of some of these diseases simply by removing gluten from their diets. As I said, the list is endless. If this post helps somebody, anybody, then it was worth posting it, although I'm not sure where it will end up as I couldn't find the end of this thread so had to jump in at the end of the first page.

http://www.free-easypublications.com/ar ... article=14

http://jccglutenfree.googlepages.com/

Good luck!


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