standing press confusion

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uvhst3p
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standing press confusion

Post by uvhst3p » Thu Oct 09, 2008 8:48 pm

hi guys! i really don't know the difference between a standing military press and a standing shoulder press. can you help me out?

i have looked at the exercises in the directory but i am still confused. :eek:


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Stephen Johnson
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Post by Stephen Johnson » Thu Oct 09, 2008 9:37 pm

uvhst3p wrote:hi guys! i really don't know the difference between a standing military press and a standing shoulder press. can you help me out?

i have looked at the exercises in the directory but i am still confused. :eek:
Shoulder presses aren't done standing, and military presses aren't done seated.

The primary difference between the two exercises is that there is involvement of the upper chest in the military press. In fact, so many Olympic lifters arched their backs to get their chests more involved in the lift that eventually the military press was dropped from the Olympic lifts. Bodybuilding purists claim that the shoulder press forces stricter use of the deltoids and triceps. Note that the upper chest is a synergist for the military press, but not for the shoulder press.

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Post by Jungledoc » Thu Oct 09, 2008 10:07 pm

I've also been confused by the terminology. As I searched around, I found that most people seem to define them just as Stephen does, but I found one writer (I probably can't find it again) who distinguished "standing chest press" from "military press" by foot position; in "military press" the heals are together. I didn't understand what difference that would make, except perhaps add an element of instability.

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Rik-Blades
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Post by Rik-Blades » Fri Oct 10, 2008 3:41 am

I'm sure it was Mark Rippetoe that made the distiction between the two.

Exactly like JungleDoc said. Heels together for the Military, Wider stance for the others.

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Post by jeffrerr » Fri Oct 10, 2008 4:14 am

The other thing I was taught when I was being coached was that the Military Press normally uses a slightly narrower grip. If you look at the smooth rings in the knurles of an olympic bar the difference was I would have my pinky on there for military and my 1st finger and thumb around it for presses, so it's not a huge difference but enough to slightly change the joint angles. Not sure what muscle incorporation changes it makes though!

John


uvhst3p
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Post by uvhst3p » Sat Oct 11, 2008 1:42 am

thanks for the inputs guys. hmmm...i wonder what press i'm doing. my grip is just a tad bit wider than shoulder width and my stance is also wider than shoulder grip

Kenny Croxdale
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Post by Kenny Croxdale » Sat Oct 11, 2008 5:35 am

Jungledoc wrote:I've also been confused by the terminology. As I searched around, I found that most people seem to define them just as Stephen does, but I found one writer (I probably can't find it again) who distinguished "standing chest press" from "military press" by foot position; in "military press" the heals are together. I didn't understand what difference that would make, except perhaps add an element of instability.
The "Military Press" was also a press performed in an stiff "attention" like stance. There was no bending or bowing of the lower back in elevating the weight. Thus, the name "Military Press."

What I'd like to know is how the "Roman Chair" (hyperextension/back extension) got it's name. I have yet to find any information on that?

Kenny Croxdale

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Post by stuward » Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:08 am

Kenny Croxdale wrote:
What I'd like to know is how the "Roman Chair" (hyperextension/back extension) got it's name. I have yet to find any information on that?

Kenny Croxdale
I think it had to do with it's similarity to this:
Image


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