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Tim Donahay Youtube Site..

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:09 am
by wilburburns
I think Peter was the one who first pointed me to the Tim Donahay Youtube Site for the Mark Rippetoe Instructional Videos. Thanks Peter.

However, I see he has posted a couple of new videos in the last few days, which I don't understand.

IE: HOW NOT TO DO THE POWER CLEAN

I'm new to actually doing this lift, therefore, I don't see what is being done wrong. Can someone explain what is wrong in this video.

The only thing I "think" I see wrong is that he doesn't seem to have a powerful Shrug/Pull from the Shoulders and upper back. It appears as most of the Power is coming from the initial Leg Drive.

Thanks,
Cliff

Re: Tim Donahay Youtube Site..

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 10:37 am
by daniel4738
wilburburns wrote:I think Peter was the one who first pointed me to the Tim Donahay Youtube Site for the Mark Rippetoe Instructional Videos. Thanks Peter.

However, I see he has posted a couple of new videos in the last few days, which I don't understand.

IE: HOW NOT TO DO THE POWER CLEAN

I'm new to actually doing this lift, therefore, I don't see what is being done wrong. Can someone explain what is wrong in this video.

The only thing I "think" I see wrong is that he doesn't seem to have a powerful Shrug/Pull from the Shoulders and upper back. It appears as most of the Power is coming from the initial Leg Drive.

Thanks,
Cliff
A power clean is supposed to be a powerful movement, an explosive drive of the hips, through the feet, lifgting with the shoulders and finally snapping underneath the bar.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=6TlbDQUWs0s

This video is a very good instructional video for the power clean.

The guy in the video is doing the movement slowly enough for it to be a strength movement. he doesn't look comfortable.

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 12:18 pm
by ellerbus
Question on the "proper-form" video, your feet .. do they typically come off the floor? Just seems uncontrollable to me (i can be accident prone).

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 1:34 pm
by TimD
Good question Ellerbus. Even top level coaches disagree on theat one. Yes, they will come off the floor a bit, because the pulling position foot stance needs to be opened up for the receiving position. However, jumping as high off the floor as shown in the video is somewhat discouraged by OL coaches. They want a good solid jump shrug, but would rather have it much shallower to facilitate getting under the bar quicker and deeper in a full squat clean. Some, Javorek, even promote flat foot pulling and not concentrating on the rise on toes. Big debate I'm not going to touch. For non O lifters, in particular sprinters and jumpers, the height in the video would be desireable for powercleaning (shallow receive position).
Tim

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 2:45 pm
by wilburburns
OK, So to clarify for me.

The Bad video is bad because the lifter just isn't Explosive enough and did not Jump from the Floor.

BUT, in the Good Video, It's not always desireable to Jump that high.

Now for the Average Lifter (Myself Maybe), Would somewhere in between the two videos mentioned be more desireable.

Cliff

Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2009 6:58 pm
by Ironman
I don't like either. The first guy wasn't explosive and didn't give much on the catch. The 2nd would be good if it wasn't for the jump and high catch. I don't think jumping is desirable at all. I can see doing that on a high pull where you lift off a bit anyway, but not a power clean.

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:44 pm
by daniel4738
Ironman wrote:I don't like either. The first guy wasn't explosive and didn't give much on the catch. The 2nd would be good if it wasn't for the jump and high catch. I don't think jumping is desirable at all. I can see doing that on a high pull where you lift off a bit anyway, but not a power clean.
Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't the high catch and jump what makes the power clean different from the clean?

I practice both, that is a strength based clean+jerk where I pull with a slow acceleration and catch into a deep squat. And the power clean (60% of the full clean) where I perform the movement as fast as possible, which results in catching high.

It is also something I am quite interested in, I was watching a Canadian coach getting a Canadian team member in my Gym doing a power snatch with a high pull and catch. It made me consider the power movement in the hips a lot more. I would be interested to know if what I am thinking is complete and utter poop. :D

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 1:52 pm
by Ironman
I thought it was just pulling it up higher and as fast as possible. I thought the catch was the same. I'm not an Olympic lifter though. I thought pulling from a power rack was part of it too, but I don't know if that's true.

It could be people just catch it higher because it is usually done with lighter weight. I know when I'm doing a light weight clean and press for the purpose of weight loss, I don't catch without bending at all, but I don't bend very much. I bend a lot more when I do it heavy.

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:15 pm
by stuward
A power clean is lighter and the catch is higher than a clean. As I understand it, The definitional difference between the two is whether the catch is in a below parallel squat or not. The low catch is sometimes called the squat clean. The squat clean is more technical but more weight can be moved as the distance isn't as great.

I like Gayle Hatch's video's. I tend to find them more credible than youtube. He actually explains the movements.
http://www.aceathlete.com/hatch/video.htm

Posted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:42 pm
by wilburburns
Thanks Stuward

Good Link and Great Videos...

It looks like Gayle prefers much less Jump/Hop, but more Widening of the stance after the Jump. I really like how he shows and teaches the Clean Pull first and truly breaks down the entire lift into it's smaller movements.

I have saved this link....

Cliff

Posted: Sun Jan 18, 2009 6:25 am
by daniel4738
Thanks for the replies Ironman and Stu. It seems as if I was along the right track, as usual it is always good to take a step back and review something to ensure you are doing it correctly.

Dan.