curls...what exercise is best?

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hari
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Post by hari » Sun May 03, 2009 10:09 pm

I dont think that All of the isolations biceps work is wasting time.
example, heaviy barbell curl like 3setsx5reps is great option.
Even MMA fighter have done the barbell curl in 4x5reps and even Bruce lee he did 4x6 reps.

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Post by brook011 » Sun May 03, 2009 10:53 pm

Low rep range isolation exercises make no sense to me.

hari
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Post by hari » Mon May 04, 2009 12:03 am

brook011 wrote:Low rep range isolation exercises make no sense to me.
some of low reps isolation exercises is like you said no sense or no meanings but not all.

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Post by frogbyte » Mon May 04, 2009 1:43 pm

Stephen Johnson wrote:Other than dumbbell hammer curls, I don't do much isolation biceps work. Once I became able to do chin-ups and dips for reps, my arms stopped being lagging bodyparts.
Chin-up seems like the only other exercise that hits the biceps at all significantly at the end of the range of motion, but even then not as much as curl. Lat pulls and rows certainly don't, and face pulls only a little. In light of that I'm surprised by all the curl haters. It's a natural movement, and as long as you're standing and not doing a preacher bench thing it's not a pure isolation either - it hits my shoulders a little in a way similar but slightly different to doing front raises, and I feel it in my wrist stabilizers more than any other exercise (other than wrist curls).
hoosegow wrote:You are going to generate more HGH and T from squatting which will cause your biceps to grow from stimuli from other lifts.
Where's the evidence of that? I'm all for hitting big muscle groups, but why do you think squats would be better for HGH than HIIT on a bike or sprints?

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Post by Rucifer » Mon May 04, 2009 2:45 pm

frogbyte wrote:
Stephen Johnson wrote:Other than dumbbell hammer curls, I don't do much isolation biceps work. Once I became able to do chin-ups and dips for reps, my arms stopped being lagging bodyparts.
Chin-up seems like the only other exercise that hits the biceps at all significantly at the end of the range of motion, but even then not as much as curl. Lat pulls and rows certainly don't, and face pulls only a little. In light of that I'm surprised by all the curl haters. It's a natural movement, and as long as you're standing and not doing a preacher bench thing it's not a pure isolation either - it hits my shoulders a little in a way similar but slightly different to doing front raises, and I feel it in my wrist stabilizers more than any other exercise (other than wrist curls).
hoosegow wrote:You are going to generate more HGH and T from squatting which will cause your biceps to grow from stimuli from other lifts.
Where's the evidence of that? I'm all for hitting big muscle groups, but why do you think squats would be better for HGH than HIIT on a bike or sprints?
It depends on how you row or chin first off all. You can row with your palms facing each other and its like doing a hammer curl. And you can chin underhand and its just like doing a standing curl. Only with these exercises, you also use other muscles. This is why I see no point in curling. I'm not arguing the hormone stuff just that curls, IMO, aren't much more effective than these two done right and are wasting precious time at the gym (unless you have no life of course). And I would say rowing provides more functional use in life than curling, even if you are moving boxes around for instance. It starts off as a deadlift and if you have to lift it up higher generally you don't stop all movements in your body and only use your biceps.

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Stephen Johnson
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Post by Stephen Johnson » Mon May 04, 2009 3:13 pm

frogbyte wrote: In light of that I'm surprised by all the curl haters.
I'm not a curl hater - I'm just not a curl fanatic, as many lifters with arm fixations seem to be. There are legitimate reasons why lifters include curls into their routines. But for me, two or three sets of one curling movement towards the end of the workout are enough for one workout. Routines that have lifters doing six different curling movements make me scratch my head.

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Post by frogbyte » Tue May 05, 2009 5:00 pm

I do agree with placing them at the end of the workout. I used to do them early - my logic at the time was to hit biceps early so that lat pulls and rows could be more focused on the other muscles with the biceps already fatigued. The reality in my experience was mainly that form suffered in the other exercises.

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