why does it hurt most after NOT using it?

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sks24
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why does it hurt most after NOT using it?

Post by sks24 » Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:53 pm

Last week I couldn't lift because I was out of town. My left knee, which has been bothering me for about a month now, got very stiff after my fourth day of no lifting. This morning I lifted for the first time in seven days, and now, in the early evening, my knee feels much better than it has since that fourth day.

I've noticed this with other injuries. If I lay around too much, sometimes my mid-back will start hurting. Now I'm seeing that with this knee.

I firmly believe that my injured soft tissues become even more inflamed (and joints more stiff and painful when bent) if they are not subject to stress at least twice a week (which is how often I do my full-body lifts).

If that's true, then it might also be true that these tissues - ligaments and tendons - heal faster if they are regularly, and carefully, stressed.

Is there research on those last two points? If so, could you point me to it?

BTW: my squats and deadlifts don't hurt a bit after I get warmed up.

(The injury I posted about back in April cleared up very nicely. And it was my other knee. And yes, the problem was form; I was collapsing my knees during squats.)

Thanks in advance for your help,
Scott


caangelxox
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Post by caangelxox » Wed Aug 05, 2009 9:45 pm

my knee pain was fixed from foam rolling. there was something tight in the quads or abductors or VM causing a trigger point that brought knee ache. I also went to my chiropractor for it and that also helped. My Chiropractor told me my knee was stiff and also something in my foot was out of alignment as well due to how I used to have my feet and not notice it when sitting at the computer (feet should be flat, not on its side like I had at times).

My chiropractor is a full body one from head to toe (about 104 moves he knows), so if you want one for your knees and/or ankles or feet or just a full body adjustment, make sure the chiropractor can do the whole body and not just the back. It should say on the window outside the chiropractors place what he/she does

before you think about a chiro, try the foam rolling first or even better, a massage therapist.

check out these url that helped me....

http://askthetrainer.com/posture-problems.html It talks about the cause of posture problems, whats tight

there is one good paragraph in there saying about chiropractors, therapists, etc..and not just professionals thinking this, clients and us people as well. Like I would refer a chiropractor that fixes full body first before a doctor depending on condition due to my good experience I had with one. The downside is that its hard to find a really good chiropractor or even a real good PT that knows what they are doing.


here is the paste from the website about this and yes this is true...
_________________________
If You ask Professionals from Different Fields you may get Different Answers
A chiropractor may tell you that your spine is out of alignment and that causes posture problems. A podiatrist (foot doctor) may tell you your whole body is out ob alignment because of a bad fitting pair of shoes or flat feet.

A psychologist may even tell you that your bad posture is due to depression. The point is, there are many different ways to look at posture problems and there may be many ways to solve them.

You don't have to be a personal trainer, doctor or specialist who deals with the human body to see that muscle imbalance is a likely cause of posture problems.

sks24
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Post by sks24 » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:00 pm

Thanks Caangelxox,

It's almost certainly the case that these knee issues are flexibility related. This latest injury happened while stepping forward with my right leg, leaning over, picking up an empty bag, and then, while stepping back with that same right leg, I felt a tiny burning sensation on the inside of my left knee.

So I must have twisted it just so, and that in such a way that a small tear was made in the soft connective tissue somewhere. It wasn't till the next day that it became stiff and sore.

That happened about three weeks ago.

The only time the pain becomes sharp is when I try to bring the heel of my foot all the to my glutes, as if I were trying to stretch my quads. Very sharp pain on the lower inside part of my knee.

What's interesting to me about these joint injuries is that they start out not hurting very bad at all. But then they get much worse before they get better.

I'm just thinking that they get better faster if I continue to stress the joint as it heals. Or, at the very least, I can maintain strength while the wound heals at whatever rate it would heal, exercise or no exercise.

Probably tough to do controlled studies on this question, but I'll bet there are some out there.

There's never been any swelling that I can see, and aspirin kills most of the pain.

Chiropractors scare me. I didn't take my foam roller with me last week. That was a mistake, especially in light of the fact that (as with you) it was the roller which helped with my other knee.

My posture has always been terrible. I've tried to work on it myself, but I think it's time I had a PT observe me.

Thanks again,
Scott

caangelxox
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Post by caangelxox » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:31 pm

yeah read the url I gave you and it will tell you what may be causing your knee pain due to a muscle tightness or the way you had your posture.

My knee problem was the inside of my knee when I sprint and kick my butt with my heel. That was solved by massaging myself. The chiropractor helped with alignment issues and knee stiffness, but only massage was able to stop the pain when I kick my butt with my heel in sprinting. The trigger point I found for the inside of the knee when the butt goes to the heel is the piriformis. I held a tennis ball or baseball on top of my hip flexor laying on it (prone) until the pain went away and then moved the ball around to make sure it went away. Part of the reason why I had problems was the way I was sleeping for a while and found out I went into a bad sleep position with my legs. I had them too straight while sleeping.

I no longer have to wear a knee sleeve when playing softball and doing sprint/agility work. Knee does not bother me anymore. if there is a knott in the hip flexors, the pain goes through the leg and the knee. go under "tight piriformis" on the url I gave you and thats where I massaged myself. Try that.

KPj
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Post by KPj » Thu Aug 06, 2009 3:21 am

I use the term 'use it or lose it' when it comes to the body. My theory, specifically on why things get worse when you don't do anything is really down to the theory of adaptation. Your muscles adapt to the stress you place upon them. In todays society, just getting on with life and not doing any exercise will keep a lot of muscles in a very shortened state for long periods of time and so they adapt to that by losing range of motion, which causes 'tightness', which can cause 'achyness'. I've not seen any specific research on this but i've never looked either. I'm sure there's some out there somewhere. Although things like strapping up injured shoulders and putting legs in casts after a break have changed due to this, as 'they' figured out that keeping joints completely immobile for long periods of times just created some fresh new problems as the joints would kind of seize up. So they try and get you moving around as soon as possible now. The problem maybe isn't even specifically not doing exercise but more about just not moving around enough.

I would advise you go see a PT, too. Some times you have so many restrictions in a muscles that stretching does nothing (or hurts), and a little manual therapy can sometimes be all you need to get things going. If they're good they'll be able to tell you what you need to know in one session.

KPj


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