Resistance training/aerobics question

Ask or answer questions, discuss and express your views

Moderators: Ironman, Jungledoc, jethrof, parth, stuward

User avatar
stuward
moderator
moderator
Posts: 6650
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:44 pm
Location: Halifax, NS

Post by stuward » Fri Apr 02, 2010 3:11 pm

There are guys here that have more rehab experience than I do and hopefully they'll offer some advise. You and I seem to be the only ones here today. It's good that you're trying. I think that anything is better than nothing. Just walking without strengthening is asking for trouble in the long run.


anzafrank
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 1:26 pm
Location: Anza, So. Calif. Mountains

Post by anzafrank » Fri Apr 02, 2010 3:29 pm

stuward wrote:There are guys here that have more rehab experience than I do and hopefully they'll offer some advise. You and I seem to be the only ones here today. It's good that you're trying. I think that anything is better than nothing. Just walking without strengthening is asking for trouble in the long run.
Stu,

The VA says don't work out, but they are only covering the're you know whats.

Didn't know - Just walking without strengthening is asking for trouble in the long run.[/quote] I seem to be learning more in the last two days than I can't remember.

Frank

User avatar
stuward
moderator
moderator
Posts: 6650
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:44 pm
Location: Halifax, NS

Post by stuward » Fri Apr 02, 2010 4:01 pm

I can't back it up with research although I'm sure it's been tested. Walking and running would put compressive stress and repetitive random stresses on the spine. Strengthening the spinal erectors and other core muscles would stabilize the spine and make it sturdier resulting in less pain and less chance of injury due to just living. The risk is in going too hard too fast or in doing exercises that place the spine in a compromised position. The GMs and RDLs are easy to adjust load so you can start out extremely light. They also work the spinal erectors isometrically as nature intended leading to more back stability. Exercises like back extensions work the erectors dynamically by changing the angle between the vertebrae. This could potentially put undue stress on specific spots.

I assume with your machine you can do high pulls and low pulls. Is there anyway to do a pull from the middle.

3 cable exercises I like are asymmetric and work the core isometrically.
http://www.viddler.com/explore/chrisgrayson/videos/78/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpkCXg2FRk8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfaOAi1- ... re=related
The idea is to go light and try to keep your torso from rotating.

anzafrank
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 1:26 pm
Location: Anza, So. Calif. Mountains

Post by anzafrank » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:01 pm

stuward wrote:I can't back it up with research although I'm sure it's been tested. Walking and running would put compressive stress and repetitive random stresses on the spine. Strengthening the spinal erectors and other core muscles would stabilize the spine and make it sturdier resulting in less pain and less chance of injury due to just living. The risk is in going too hard too fast or in doing exercises that place the spine in a compromised position. The GMs and RDLs are easy to adjust load so you can start out extremely light. They also work the spinal erectors isometrically as nature intended leading to more back stability. Exercises like back extensions work the erectors dynamically by changing the angle between the vertebrae. This could potentially put undue stress on specific spots.

I assume with your machine you can do high pulls and low pulls. Is there anyway to do a pull from the middle.

3 cable exercises I like are asymmetric and work the core isometrically.
http://www.viddler.com/explore/chrisgrayson/videos/78/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpkCXg2FRk8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfaOAi1- ... re=related
The idea is to go light and try to keep your torso from rotating.
Stu,

Thanks for the advice on back extentions! If you think doing GMs and RDLs is ok, then I will try them. I only have dumbells. Yes, I can do almost straight pulls (rowing) with my chest against the preacher, and pulling the curl bar back towards my chest from the other end of the machine.

3 cable exercises I like are asymmetric and work the core isometrically.

When you say core, are you talking about the stomach also? I will look at the exercise's from your links, but I'm on dial up, and it will take for ever to download.

I've wanted to work out my stomach for five years, but every time I did, the back injury would set me back for several months.

Finding out that I know nothing about my back, let alone working out my back has got me sort of afraid to do anything on my own. So very much more to this than I ever dreamed! What a stroke of luck you saw my original post. Thanks for taking the time to help!

Frank

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Fri Apr 02, 2010 6:15 pm

This is such a great thread just between the two of you that I hate to interrupt, but I'm wondering, Frank, if you would be willing to say what your "triglyceride-lowering" medicine is. Would you be willing to let us know any other meds as well? I obviously can't really evaluate the treatment without seeing you, having access to all your lab results, etc., but I might be able to say if any of the meds could be contributing to the lack of energy and the feeling of weekness, and might (MIGHT) be able to suggest alternatives.


anzafrank
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 1:26 pm
Location: Anza, So. Calif. Mountains

Post by anzafrank » Fri Apr 02, 2010 6:53 pm

Jungledoc wrote:This is such a great thread just between the two of you that I hate to interrupt, but I'm wondering, Frank, if you would be willing to say what your "triglyceride-lowering" medicine is. Would you be willing to let us know any other meds as well? I obviously can't really evaluate the treatment without seeing you, having access to all your lab results, etc., but I might be able to say if any of the meds could be contributing to the lack of energy and the feeling of weekness, and might (MIGHT) be able to suggest alternatives.
Jungledoc,

Thanks very much for chiming in. It seems I've hit the jackpot!

For the triglycerides I'm taking Triplix as of the last two months. For several years before Triplix I've been taking Gemfibrozil. My regular Dr. pulled blood a few months back, and the tri's were 3000. He refered me to a indocrinoligest, and she put me on Triplix. Last blood test from her the trie's were 325. I have lost some weight, lowered the carbs, so I'm hoping the next blood test will be better.

For my hypothroide problem I'm taking Levothroxin 250mcg. I also take Omeprazole 20mg twice per day for years. I also take some propranolol 40mg for palpatations, I think brought on from using smokeless tobacco. I quit smoking five years ago, but can't seem to get off tobacco. I know the propranolol makes me sleepy. I know I'm a mess, but I'm trying to turn it around.

Also, the Indo said that if I don't get my blood sugar down, she will put me on diabetes meds. Like I said, I've lost a some pounds, and cut the carbs except for lasts nights popcorn frenzy. Sorry to burden you with all the [email protected]@p.

Frank

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:26 pm

Frank--I'm guessing that your endocrinologist is on top of things, but here are a few thoughts that might result in your asking a few questions.

With triglyceride levels in the 1000+ range, it is unlikely that you can lower it enough by any one means. You have to use medicine, diet and exercise in concert.

With triglycerides in that range it is important to distinguish between something called Type I dyslipoproteinemia, and Type V dyslipoproteinemia. Type I is benign, type V is not. I'll bet your doctor has checked this, but may not have discussed it much. The distinguishing is complicated, and the doc may not want to devote time to the explanation. The distinction has to do with whether the triglycerides are carried in chylomicrons, or in LDLs and VLDLs.

Triplix is newer fibric acid derivative, similar to gemfibrizole. It may be better at lowering LDL than gemfibrizole is, but I don't see any other clear advantages. It's more expensive; if the VA is providing your meds that's not of much immediate significance (although it brings up public health issues that we can't get into here), but if you are paying for your meds personally might be an issue. It is usually used in conjunction with a statin (like Zocor--they all have "statin" in their generic names). Those can cause muscle inflammation, moreso when used with a fibric acid derivative. Do you know why you aren't on a statin? If not, I'd suggest asking the doc.

Hypothyroidism contributes to high triglycerides, so maintaining your thyroid dose in the effective range is important. Checking TSH levels and adjusting the dose accordingly is critical. Remember that HIGH TSH means LOW thyroid, and vice versa.

Diabetes or even insulin intolerance increases triglyceride levels (in addition to the fact that both hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes have causes in common). I know that adding medications is emotionally difficult, controlling the diabetes is important for many reasons. Diabetes damages your arteries, and works in conjunction with many other factors to increase your risk of heart attacks and strokes. Taking diabetes meds MAY make the triglycerides easier to control, may make you feel better overall, and may significantly prolong your life. If you take them, you can continue to improve your diet and exercise, and might be able to get off them in the future.

Propranolol can increase triglyceride levels a little. There are other beta-blockers that do not, so you might ask your doc about this. The ones that do not are the ones that have "intrinsic sympathomimetic activity". The doc will know what that means. If you could get off the beta blockers by cutting the tobacco... well, what do you think you should do?


As far as diet is concerned, the most important factor is carbohydrate restriction, especially simple sugars and grain products. Restriction of fats can either lower or raise your triglycerides under different circumstances. The "standard" recommendation is to lower your fat intake to no more than 10% of total calories. How a person can do that while still restricting carbs is beyond me. It would require 70 or 80% of your food to be protein, and as much as I love my meat and eggs, I don't think I could handle THAT.

One thing that is quite clear is that increasing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (O-3 PUFAs) in the diet can dramatically lower triglycerides. The best source of O-3 PUFAs is fatty fish. The easiest way to get enough is by taking fish oil capsules. The two main O-3 PUFAs in fish oil are called DHA and EPA. An article that I was just looking at mentioned that the actual content of DHA and EPA in fish oil varies from 400 to 1000 mg in each 1000mg fish oil capsule. I went and checked the capsules that I have been taking--they only contain 300 mg each! The recommendation for lowering triglycerides is 4000 mg of O-3 per day, so that would require 13 of my capsules per day. The cost of that would not be insignificant. If you aren't taking fish oil or eating a lot of fatty fish, this might be something to explore. If the VA doc prescribes fish oil, I think that the VA would provide it.

I would suggest that along with increasing O-3 PUFAs, you should also be trying to reduce O-6 PUFAs in your diet. Again, that comes back to grain. Avoid using grain oils, and if possible use grass-fed, not grain-fed meat.

Aerobic exercise has been shown to lower triglycerides. I think your walking fulfills this. I'd agree with what Stu said about the bike--use it for some more intensive intervals for a few minutes 2 or 3 times per week. Maybe only 4 or 5 minutes.

I'd also agree with what he said about the weight lifting.

The abdominal and the back muscles work together to protect your spine, so strengthening them both is important. You need to distinguish muscle soreness from doing unaccustomed exercise from pain of spinal injury, which may be hard to do. Often people with back pain start exercise, and have muscle soreness, and assume that they have made their back condition worse, whereas they are actually starting on the road to making it better. Muscle soreness usually starts a few hours after the exercise, peaks at 24 to 48 hours after the exercise and then resolves.

Although I wouldn't usually recommend this for someone who is not a fairly advanced lifter, it might work well for you do a body-split routine. Have one workout that is a lower body only, and another that is upper body only. Whether you lift 2, 3 or 4 days per week, just alternate the workouts. If you work out every-other day, this would give you a 4-day rest for each body area. By the way, it is the lower-body work that will give you the greatest return in lowering triglycerides.

I'd agree with all the exercises that Stu recommended. Learn to do them all with a "tight core". Tighten your stomach and low back muscles before doing the lifts. Take a breath by expanding your belly. It will feel like you are sucking the air into your abdomen. Hold the air while you tighten the belly and back muscles. Then gently let a little air out after you pass the hardest point in the lift.

I love the Pallof "press" because it is so easy to adjust the difficulty by either changing the weight or by changing how long you hold the extended-arm position. You can start those really light, and gradually increase them. GMs and RDLs can be started with just body-weight, and increased very slowly.

Wow. Sorry to prattle on for so long. It's a day off for me, my wife is out, and I'm just sitting here doing forum, facebook, email, etc. I need to get off my duff, move around, read, and then go lift!

anzafrank
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 1:26 pm
Location: Anza, So. Calif. Mountains

Post by anzafrank » Sat Apr 03, 2010 1:29 pm

Jungledoc wrote:Frank--I'm guessing that your endocrinologist is on top of things, but here are a few thoughts that might result in your asking a few questions.

With triglyceride levels in the 1000+ range, it is unlikely that you can lower it enough by any one means. You have to use medicine, diet and exercise in concert.

With triglycerides in that range it is important to distinguish between something called Type I dyslipoproteinemia, and Type V dyslipoproteinemia. Type I is benign, type V is not. I'll bet your doctor has checked this, but may not have discussed it much. The distinguishing is complicated, and the doc may not want to devote time to the explanation. The distinction has to do with whether the triglycerides are carried in chylomicrons, or in LDLs and VLDLs.

Triplix is newer fibric acid derivative, similar to gemfibrizole. It may be better at lowering LDL than gemfibrizole is, but I don't see any other clear advantages. It's more expensive; if the VA is providing your meds that's not of much immediate significance (although it brings up public health issues that we can't get into here), but if you are paying for your meds personally might be an issue. It is usually used in conjunction with a statin (like Zocor--they all have "statin" in their generic names). Those can cause muscle inflammation, moreso when used with a fibric acid derivative. Do you know why you aren't on a statin? If not, I'd suggest asking the doc.

Hypothyroidism contributes to high triglycerides, so maintaining your thyroid dose in the effective range is important. Checking TSH levels and adjusting the dose accordingly is critical. Remember that HIGH TSH means LOW thyroid, and vice versa.

Diabetes or even insulin intolerance increases triglyceride levels (in addition to the fact that both hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes have causes in common). I know that adding medications is emotionally difficult, controlling the diabetes is important for many reasons. Diabetes damages your arteries, and works in conjunction with many other factors to increase your risk of heart attacks and strokes. Taking diabetes meds MAY make the triglycerides easier to control, may make you feel better overall, and may significantly prolong your life. If you take them, you can continue to improve your diet and exercise, and might be able to get off them in the future.

Propranolol can increase triglyceride levels a little. There are other beta-blockers that do not, so you might ask your doc about this. The ones that do not are the ones that have "intrinsic sympathomimetic activity". The doc will know what that means. If you could get off the beta blockers by cutting the tobacco... well, what do you think you should do?


As far as diet is concerned, the most important factor is carbohydrate restriction, especially simple sugars and grain products. Restriction of fats can either lower or raise your triglycerides under different circumstances. The "standard" recommendation is to lower your fat intake to no more than 10% of total calories. How a person can do that while still restricting carbs is beyond me. It would require 70 or 80% of your food to be protein, and as much as I love my meat and eggs, I don't think I could handle THAT.

One thing that is quite clear is that increasing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (O-3 PUFAs) in the diet can dramatically lower triglycerides. The best source of O-3 PUFAs is fatty fish. The easiest way to get enough is by taking fish oil capsules. The two main O-3 PUFAs in fish oil are called DHA and EPA. An article that I was just looking at mentioned that the actual content of DHA and EPA in fish oil varies from 400 to 1000 mg in each 1000mg fish oil capsule. I went and checked the capsules that I have been taking--they only contain 300 mg each! The recommendation for lowering triglycerides is 4000 mg of O-3 per day, so that would require 13 of my capsules per day. The cost of that would not be insignificant. If you aren't taking fish oil or eating a lot of fatty fish, this might be something to explore. If the VA doc prescribes fish oil, I think that the VA would provide it.

I would suggest that along with increasing O-3 PUFAs, you should also be trying to reduce O-6 PUFAs in your diet. Again, that comes back to grain. Avoid using grain oils, and if possible use grass-fed, not grain-fed meat.

Aerobic exercise has been shown to lower triglycerides. I think your walking fulfills this. I'd agree with what Stu said about the bike--use it for some more intensive intervals for a few minutes 2 or 3 times per week. Maybe only 4 or 5 minutes.

I'd also agree with what he said about the weight lifting.

The abdominal and the back muscles work together to protect your spine, so strengthening them both is important. You need to distinguish muscle soreness from doing unaccustomed exercise from pain of spinal injury, which may be hard to do. Often people with back pain start exercise, and have muscle soreness, and assume that they have made their back condition worse, whereas they are actually starting on the road to making it better. Muscle soreness usually starts a few hours after the exercise, peaks at 24 to 48 hours after the exercise and then resolves.

Although I wouldn't usually recommend this for someone who is not a fairly advanced lifter, it might work well for you do a body-split routine. Have one workout that is a lower body only, and another that is upper body only. Whether you lift 2, 3 or 4 days per week, just alternate the workouts. If you work out every-other day, this would give you a 4-day rest for each body area. By the way, it is the lower-body work that will give you the greatest return in lowering triglycerides.

I'd agree with all the exercises that Stu recommended. Learn to do them all with a "tight core". Tighten your stomach and low back muscles before doing the lifts. Take a breath by expanding your belly. It will feel like you are sucking the air into your abdomen. Hold the air while you tighten the belly and back muscles. Then gently let a little air out after you pass the hardest point in the lift.

I love the Pallof "press" because it is so easy to adjust the difficulty by either changing the weight or by changing how long you hold the extended-arm position. You can start those really light, and gradually increase them. GMs and RDLs can be started with just body-weight, and increased very slowly.

Wow. Sorry to prattle on for so long. It's a day off for me, my wife is out, and I'm just sitting here doing forum, facebook, email, etc. I need to get off my duff, move around, read, and then go lift!
Jungledock,

Thanks so much for taking the time that you probably don't have a lot of.

Your right about the Endo Doc not explaining a lot of things to me. I'm seeing her with medicare, (my va doc is a dope. He forgot to call out for blood sugar on a blood test) but now that medicare cut the dr's back by 21 percent, I hope she will still see me in a few weeks.

The visits last about 10 minutes, so no, she hasen't explaned a whole lot, Nothing like you came up with. She did say I could eat fruit and vegies and whole grains, but not bread. I've been sneaking in a slice or two of sprouted grain (no flour) bread.

On a good day (mosty) for breakfast I have some frozen spinish, two big table spoons of ground flax seed, a small amount of berries, small amounts of raw almonds, wallnuts, sunflower seeds, and 1/3 can of beans. Was eating an egg or two, but was afraid of the fat etc. Should I not be eating this for breakfast? Should I be on the atkins diet, and not be able to poop again? Ha!


"Do you know why you aren't on a statin?" I asked her about that, but she said no. Maybe she is waiting to see if I can help with diet and exercise first?

Thanks for the info about dibetes meds! I just thought it would be the end of the world taking meds for that.

This might not be the right place to be spilling my gutts out, but I have beem drinking beer alcoholically for years. I had to cut it back to eight beers every sat. (once per wk.) because it made my heart race. I have had my heart rate (next day) race to 180, then to irregular. Two sats. ago I drank the same eight beers, but my I couldn't keep my heart from racing even with propan. In other words, I'm trying to stop drinking. Was really hoping dumping the beer and exercising would turn things around. It's a little embarressing airing out my little secrets for all to see.

The Indo doc. did tell me to step up the fish oil to three times the recommended dosage. I take carlsons liquid at about three teaspoons. I think that is well over the 4000 you recommended. Each teaspoon is 1600. Just wish it would improve my memory. It's been getting bad for several months.

Thanks for all the advice doc.! You might be helping a lot more people than just me. I will copy your response, and study it.

Basically, I'm eating lean (or close to) proteen, vegies, fruit, and some whole grains. Maybe you could give some advice on changing my diet if need be? Sure could go for a giant dark chocolate bar! It's Easter! I know I can't.

Frank

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Sun Apr 04, 2010 11:46 pm

Wow, Frank. You can be brutally honest when you need to be. Even in a relatively anonymous setting like an on-line forum, it would not be easy for most people to talk about the alcohol. I'm guessing that alcohol is a major contributor to both your high triglycerides and the heart racing. One way or the other, you've got to stop it completely. I'd suggest that you ask about treatment for that at the VA--they probably have a program there. If not, just find 2 or 3 near-by AA groups to visit, and then start going to one faithfully, and start working the program.

It is not too surprising that the Endo doc doesn't explain much. If she's limited to a 10 minute visit, she has to be pretty selective in how she uses the time. You might ask if you can have a longer appointment, or if she has an email address that you can use to ask questions in advance, then discuss at your visit. Also, think through ahead of time what your main questions are, have them organized in your head or on paper, and then just go ahead and ask. Right at the beginning of the appointment say something like "I have a couple of questions that I'd like to ask today." There is nothing more frustrating to a doctor than when they think they are done, and about to go out the door, and the patient says "oh, by the way" and asks a question that requires several minutes to discuss (or introduces a whole new problem).

Also, you need to tell the endocrinologist about the alcohol, if you haven't already.

User avatar
stuward
moderator
moderator
Posts: 6650
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:44 pm
Location: Halifax, NS

Post by stuward » Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:07 am

Sending her a copy of this thread would probably help.

anzafrank
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 1:26 pm
Location: Anza, So. Calif. Mountains

Post by anzafrank » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:14 pm

Jungledoc wrote:Wow, Frank. You can be brutally honest when you need to be. Even in a relatively anonymous setting like an on-line forum, it would not be easy for most people to talk about the alcohol. I'm guessing that alcohol is a major contributor to both your high triglycerides and the heart racing. One way or the other, you've got to stop it completely. I'd suggest that you ask about treatment for that at the VA--they probably have a program there. If not, just find 2 or 3 near-by AA groups to visit, and then start going to one faithfully, and start working the program.

It is not too surprising that the Endo doc doesn't explain much. If she's limited to a 10 minute visit, she has to be pretty selective in how she uses the time. You might ask if you can have a longer appointment, or if she has an email address that you can use to ask questions in advance, then discuss at your visit. Also, think through ahead of time what your main questions are, have them organized in your head or on paper, and then just go ahead and ask. Right at the beginning of the appointment say something like "I have a couple of questions that I'd like to ask today." There is nothing more frustrating to a doctor than when they think they are done, and about to go out the door, and the patient says "oh, by the way" and asks a question that requires several minutes to discuss (or introduces a whole new problem).

Also, you need to tell the endocrinologist about the alcohol, if you haven't already.
Hi Doc,

Thanks for the reply. Yes, I told the endo about my drinking 8 beers over a 7 hour period once per week. She asked if I drink hard stuff, I said no. She suggested I only drink a few per day, not eight in one. My Liver comes up good with the blood tests, and I can pass for 48/50, so I don't look like a drunk.

I'm going to bring notes from your post to ask her about. I couldn't bring the whole text, as she wouldn't have time to read it, especially now that they cut her back 21%. Thats fair isn't? Make it so no doc's will take it anymore? Saves a lot of $.

Do you think I should stop consumption of all grains and fruit? Even ground flax seed?

Speaking of beer, I don't think I will be drinking anymore. Just the thought of it driving my tri's up is enough to keep me away. Not to mention the racing heart thing.

One guestion: Have you ever heard of people eating salty and or spicy meals, and then getting palpatations? I've asked many doc's about this, and none have ever heard of it. The va has done 24hr holters, ultra sounds, and if nothings up with that, they won't allow me to get in front of a cardiologist. Been going on for years.

Frank

User avatar
stuward
moderator
moderator
Posts: 6650
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 5:44 pm
Location: Halifax, NS

Post by stuward » Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:14 pm

There are 3 main reasons for limiting grains. The first is due to the carbs. The more refined the grains are the more like sugar your body treats them. Limiting grains and sugar will improve your tris just because the carbs are being limited. The second reason is due to the anti nutrients in the grains. various ones have detrimental effects according to your sensitivities. Gluten is usually the most offensive, especially to those with Celiac disease. The third reason is due to the fat profile of the grains. Grains are generally high in Omega 6 which can cause a number of issues in large qtys. For this reason vegetable oils need to be avoided. Exceptions are ones high in other fats, like olive oil, avocado, coconut and flax.

anzafrank
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 1:26 pm
Location: Anza, So. Calif. Mountains

Post by anzafrank » Mon Apr 05, 2010 5:02 pm

stuward wrote:There are 3 main reasons for limiting grains. The first is due to the carbs. The more refined the grains are the more like sugar your body treats them. Limiting grains and sugar will improve your tris just because the carbs are being limited. The second reason is due to the anti nutrients in the grains. various ones have detrimental effects according to your sensitivities. Gluten is usually the most offensive, especially to those with Celiac disease. The third reason is due to the fat profile of the grains. Grains are generally high in Omega 6 which can cause a number of issues in large qtys. For this reason vegetable oils need to be avoided. Exceptions are ones high in other fats, like olive oil, avocado, coconut and flax.
Thanks for the input Stu,

About the only grains I have on most days is the flax seed I have at breakfast. Lunch a lot of times is a few pieces of fruit, and dinner is vegies (low carb type) and chicken-turkey-fish etc. I sometimes have a slice or two of low glycemic non flour bread, but not every day.

I haven't been eating sweets with my wife for about three weeks, or drinking beer for that matter. We only use olive oil, and have for years.

What I described is on a good day. Sat and sun I OD'ed on ham. Thanks for explaining it in detail Stu. I need to hear it.

Frank

User avatar
Jungledoc
moderator
moderator
Posts: 7578
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:11 am
Location: Kudjip, Papua New Guinea

Post by Jungledoc » Mon Apr 05, 2010 10:10 pm

Probably the reason that the doc didn't say to cut out the beers completely is because she just assumed that you couldn't do it. If you can, it would be best to stop altogether.

Ditto what Stu said about grains.

I haven't heard specifically about salty or spicy meals causing palpitations, but if that's what you experience, that's true for you. If I were you, I'd just cut down on the salt and spice, rather than try to argue with the VA. If they ever do a Holter again, eat lots of spice and salt to see what turns up.

anzafrank
Apprentice
Apprentice
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 1:26 pm
Location: Anza, So. Calif. Mountains

Post by anzafrank » Tue Apr 06, 2010 11:57 am

Jungledoc wrote:Probably the reason that the doc didn't say to cut out the beers completely is because she just assumed that you couldn't do it. If you can, it would be best to stop altogether.

Ditto what Stu said about grains.

I haven't heard specifically about salty or spicy meals causing palpitations, but if that's what you experience, that's true for you. If I were you, I'd just cut down on the salt and spice, rather than try to argue with the VA. If they ever do a Holter again, eat lots of spice and salt to see what turns up.
Thanks Doc,

She did say stopping the beer would be best. Thanks for the advice about what to ask her. I will bring a small list with me, and I'm hoping not drinking will improve the numbers along with diet. You popped my bubble about no grains at all.

Frank


Post Reply