Resistance training for a 62 yr. old

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anzafrank
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Resistance training for a 62 yr. old

Post by anzafrank » Mon May 24, 2010 3:57 pm

I will be 63 this summer and have a question. You guys told me to work body parts twice per wk. as in; mon/upper, tue./legs, thurs./upper, fri./legs etc. I'm wondering at my age if hitting everything once per wk. as in; mon./upper-push, wens./upper-pull, fri./legs might be better. Any thoughts? Thanks,

Frank

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Stephen Johnson
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Re: Resistance training for a 62 yr. old

Post by Stephen Johnson » Mon May 24, 2010 7:38 pm

anzafrank wrote:I will be 63 this summer and have a question. You guys told me to work body parts twice per wk. as in; mon/upper, tue./legs, thurs./upper, fri./legs etc. I'm wondering at my age if hitting everything once per wk. as in; mon./upper-push, wens./upper-pull, fri./legs might be better. Any thoughts?
If it makes you feel any better, I'll be 57 next month. So I'm not that far behind you. :wink:

But getting back to your question, it depends on your goals. If you are looking to maintain your current level of development, training a bodypart once a week is fine. But if you're looking to improve either muscle size or strength, it probably won't work, even at your age.

Hopefully, you aren't lifting heavy all four days. One heavy and one light workout for both upper and lower bodyparts will keep you from burning out as well as keep you from becoming detrained between workouts.

If you would rather cut the number of days that you want to spend in the gym from 4 to 3, you could also do a light full body workout one day, and heavy upper and lower workouts on the others. Or vice versa.

Good luck, happy training, and happy birthday early. Keep on trucking.

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Re: Resistance training for a 62 yr. old

Post by anzafrank » Mon May 24, 2010 8:00 pm

Stephen Johnson wrote:
anzafrank wrote:I will be 63 this summer and have a question. You guys told me to work body parts twice per wk. as in; mon/upper, tue./legs, thurs./upper, fri./legs etc. I'm wondering at my age if hitting everything once per wk. as in; mon./upper-push, wens./upper-pull, fri./legs might be better. Any thoughts?
If it makes you feel any better, I'll be 57 next month. So I'm not that far behind you. :wink:

But getting back to your question, it depends on your goals. If you are looking to maintain your current level of development, training a bodypart once a week is fine. But if you're looking to improve either muscle size or strength, it probably won't work, even at your age.

Hopefully, you aren't lifting heavy all four days. One heavy and one light workout for both upper and lower bodyparts will keep you from burning out as well as keep you from becoming detrained between workouts.

If you would rather cut the number of days that you want to spend in the gym from 4 to 3, you could also do a light full body workout one day, and heavy upper and lower workouts on the others. Or vice versa.

Good luck, happy training, and happy birthday early. Keep on trucking.
Thanks Stephen,

If it makes me feel better? Of course it doesn't! Your still a child! Ha! I was really hoping for a easier way to work out, but it's just not going to happen and it's all your fault. [email protected]@ kids now a days...

Frank

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Post by Jungledoc » Mon May 24, 2010 10:25 pm

You could also do a full-body w/o each time, but vary the exercises. You could do 1 lower-body lift, 1 upper push and 1 upper pull, but alternate exercises. Example:

1 Squat, press ("military"), row

2 Deadlift, bench, chin-ups

3 Good mornings, pushups, face-pulls

You could think of dozens of variations. If it were me, I'd probably have 2 different rep-weight combinations for each lift, and alternate them. That way the first day might be higher-rep, lower-weight squats, etc., then the next day the DL would be lower-rep, higher-weight, the GMs light, and then squats heavy. Does that make any sense at all? It does to me, but then again, that doesn't always mean much.

You need to be more cautions about the total load (combination of weight loading and reps) than either a younger beginner, or an older experienced lifter. Take it really easy at first, and increase gradually. Even if it's really easy at first, if you gradually increase the load, you will be making progress. You don't want to make yourself tired and sore all the time!

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Post by anzafrank » Mon May 24, 2010 10:57 pm

Jungledoc wrote:You could also do a full-body w/o each time, but vary the exercises. You could do 1 lower-body lift, 1 upper push and 1 upper pull, but alternate exercises. Example:

1 Squat, press ("military"), row

2 Deadlift, bench, chin-ups

3 Good mornings, pushups, face-pulls

You could think of dozens of variations. If it were me, I'd probably have 2 different rep-weight combinations for each lift, and alternate them. That way the first day might be higher-rep, lower-weight squats, etc., then the next day the DL would be lower-rep, higher-weight, the GMs light, and then squats heavy. Does that make any sense at all? It does to me, but then again, that doesn't always mean much.

You need to be more cautions about the total load (combination of weight loading and reps) than either a younger beginner, or an older experienced lifter. Take it really easy at first, and increase gradually. Even if it's really easy at first, if you gradually increase the load, you will be making progress. You don't want to make yourself tired and sore all the time!
Thanks for the info doc. Each time you guys give me advice I give it a try. I'm being too careful now in fear of my back, and therefore not progressing much, but that will hopefully change soon. Thanks,

Frank

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Post by quadfrog » Mon May 24, 2010 11:15 pm

I'm 60 and have been lifting since age 13, with a 6 yr. involvement in competitive bodybuilding, mostly with the NPC. These days, I mainly do compound movements, two days-a-week, including bent-over rows, barbell curls, military presses, benching, and squats. I always start with a warm-up set of 12, then do three sets of 8-10 with enough weight to require moderate effort. On the other day, my in-between day, I join the yuppies and girls on the machine circut and include some light dumbell or cable work. It's great being my age, because I don't have to prove anything to anyone but myself; I actually look forward to and enjoy my brief workouts at the gym as much as my outdoor activities.
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Re: Resistance training for a 62 yr. old

Post by Kenny Croxdale » Tue May 25, 2010 7:35 am

anzafrank wrote:I will be 63 this summer and have a question. You guys told me to work body parts twice per wk. as in; mon/upper, tue./legs, thurs./upper, fri./legs etc. I'm wondering at my age if hitting everything once per wk. as in; mon./upper-push, wens./upper-pull, fri./legs might be better. Any thoughts? Thanks,

Frank[/
amzafrank,

A once a week program works for increasing muscle mass and/or strength. I started performing my training once a week back in the early 1980s and am still doing well with that method of training today, thirty years later.

Kenny Croxdale

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Re: Resistance training for a 62 yr. old

Post by anzafrank » Tue May 25, 2010 9:21 am

Kenny Croxdale wrote:
anzafrank wrote:I will be 63 this summer and have a question. You guys told me to work body parts twice per wk. as in; mon/upper, tue./legs, thurs./upper, fri./legs etc. I'm wondering at my age if hitting everything once per wk. as in; mon./upper-push, wens./upper-pull, fri./legs might be better. Any thoughts? Thanks,

Frank[/
amzafrank,

A once a week program works for increasing muscle mass and/or strength. I started performing my training once a week back in the early 1980s and am still doing well with that method of training today, thirty years later.

Kenny Croxdale
Thanks Kenny - Workout requency is confusing to me. Some sites claim that no matter what age, a once a week (hitting all muscle groups) program is all that is needed to build muscle as it takes 7 to 10 days recovery time between workouts. Others say twice.

My thinking was telling me that at my age recovery time would be longer, and that I would need a week in between workouts. Also, I could increase the number of sets and throw in more exercises. Very confusing.

Frank

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Post by anzafrank » Tue May 25, 2010 9:51 am

quadfrog wrote:I'm 60 and have been lifting since age 13, with a 6 yr. involvement in competitive bodybuilding, mostly with the NPC. These days, I mainly do compound movements, two days-a-week, including bent-over rows, barbell curls, military presses, benching, and squats. I always start with a warm-up set of 12, then do three sets of 8-10 with enough weight to require moderate effort. On the other day, my in-between day, I join the yuppies and girls on the machine circut and include some light dumbell or cable work. It's great being my age, because I don't have to prove anything to anyone but myself; I actually look forward to and enjoy my brief workouts at the gym as much as my outdoor activities.
I'm guessing you don't feel the need to do 3 exercises per group like bench, then flys, then pullovers etc.? Thanks for all the tips!

Frank

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Post by stuward » Tue May 25, 2010 10:00 am

Frank, recovery time between workouts depends on how intense you exercise. I'm sure Kenny has it figured out how hard he can go and still progress on a 7 day cycle. Some people would become detrained over 7 days or at least deconditioned without at least 1 light workout in between. Others, especially those doing slow sets to failure, could require more than 7 days between workouts. If you are lifting light weights, you probably need more frequent workouts. The other aspect of infrequent training is the potential for more delayed onset muscle soreness. To me that's worth training more often. The final factor is phycological. I train every day. That helps with building habits that I don't have to think about. The only decision is what type of training I do, not whether to train. My fear is that if I don't do something, I'll do nothing as my natural tendancy is to be sedentary. My father could barely get out of a chair by himself when he was my age and died at 58. That's not going to happen to me. The bottom line is that you have to do what works for you.

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Post by anzafrank » Tue May 25, 2010 10:27 am

stuward wrote:Frank, recovery time between workouts depends on how intense you exercise. I'm sure Kenny has it figured out how hard he can go and still progress on a 7 day cycle. Some people would become detrained over 7 days or at least deconditioned without at least 1 light workout in between. Others, especially those doing slow sets to failure, could require more than 7 days between workouts. If you are lifting light weights, you probably need more frequent workouts. The other aspect of infrequent training is the potential for more delayed onset muscle soreness. To me that's worth training more often. The final factor is phycological. I train every day. That helps with building habits that I don't have to think about. The only decision is what type of training I do, not whether to train. My fear is that if I don't do something, I'll do nothing as my natural tendancy is to be sedentary. My father could barely get out of a chair by himself when he was my age and died at 58. That's not going to happen to me. The bottom line is that you have to do what works for you.
Hi Stu, you said you train every day. Are you talking 7 days? I was walking every day until I injured myself, and my tendancy also is to do nothing. When I workout, I don't really hit it hard enough to get sore much, so maybe I need the extra workout day. I also still need to loose weight. My dad died at 57. Thanks,

Frank

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Post by stuward » Tue May 25, 2010 10:32 am

I generally go to the gym Monday to Friday and I vary the intensity and focus for each workout. I ussually go to the gym with my son on the weekend and help him with his workout. On the other day we usually do some outdoor activity if the weather's good.

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Post by TimD » Tue May 25, 2010 11:41 am

Anza, it all kind of depends on what your goals are, of which I'm not clear on. If you're trying to build muscle, and strength, you might want to take Kenny's suggestion. He's a competitive Powerlifter at age 60 plus and knows what he's talking about. However, if you're just into being physically fit, you might want to go with 2-3 days/week as Doc and Stu suggested, varying schedules and intensities for recovery purposes. I'm 61 myself, and by varying intensities, can train 4-6 days/week
Tim

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Post by Stephen Johnson » Tue May 25, 2010 12:08 pm

stuward wrote: My father ... died at 58. .
anzafrank wrote: My dad died at 57.
Maybe I'll cancel my next birthday and stay at 56 :wink:

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Post by anzafrank » Tue May 25, 2010 5:11 pm

TimD wrote:Anza, it all kind of depends on what your goals are, of which I'm not clear on. If you're trying to build muscle, and strength, you might want to take Kenny's suggestion. He's a competitive Powerlifter at age 60 plus and knows what he's talking about. However, if you're just into being physically fit, you might want to go with 2-3 days/week as Doc and Stu suggested, varying schedules and intensities for recovery purposes. I'm 61 myself, and by varying intensities, can train 4-6 days/week
Tim
Tim, apparently i'm still confused. I thought that if you just want to keep what you have, then it's once per wk. If you want to build, it's twice per wk. I would like to build some muscle and strength if it's possible at my age, but if i'm lifting light, I don't think it will happen. My back is getting much better, and eventually I will be able to hit it much harder.

If you don't mind, could you explain one of your typical weekly workout? Thanks

Frank

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