Will this confuse the muscles?

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frankie123
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Will this confuse the muscles?

Post by frankie123 » Sun May 30, 2010 6:13 pm

So let say im doing A1 exercise for bicep then the month after i do A2. Here comes the question: On the third month, can i just go bak to A1 or do i have to have a A3?


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stuward
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Post by stuward » Sun May 30, 2010 6:23 pm

Either.

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Post by frankie123 » Sun May 30, 2010 7:35 pm

^^^
errr mind telling me how then? thanks. changing reps n weights n sets?

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Stephen Johnson
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Re: Will this confuse the muscles?

Post by Stephen Johnson » Sun May 30, 2010 9:48 pm

frankie123 wrote:So let say im doing A1 exercise for bicep then the month after i do A2. Here comes the question: On the third month, can i just go bak to A1 or do i have to have a A3?
How long have you been lifting?

What is your goal (besides confusing your muscles)? Getting bigger, stronger or training for a sport?

What does your current workout look like? (Exercises, sets, reps)

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Post by Jungledoc » Sun May 30, 2010 10:43 pm

Frankie, don't change just to be changing. If the current exercise is providing the desired effect, stay with it. If you are bored, find a new exercise, and maybe come back to the first one later. Yeah, you should change the set-rep scheme from time to time. For instance, do 3x8 for a while, then maybe 5x5, then maybe 2x12. It's not rocket science. You're not going to do some sort of irreparable damage to yourself if you don't the the right set-rep scheme, or if you chose close-grip bench when some guru thinks you should do push-downs. Just try stuff. Go ahead and do it. You'll learn.

Do you read? Where do you live? Do you have access to a library? Do you read any exercise blogs or other sites besides this one? Start learning, and you won't have to ask people like us to give you a pat answer to things that you could really answer better yourself if you were just willing to try things.


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Post by nygmen » Mon May 31, 2010 12:36 pm

Jungledoc wrote:Frankie, don't change just to be changing. If the current exercise is providing the desired effect, stay with it.
This, so bad this.

Why fix something that isn't broken?

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Post by TimD » Mon May 31, 2010 4:11 pm

Frankie, this isn't meant to slam you. But the good Doc and Shawn are right on the money. You're young, and going down the path of a lot of young novices. You've obviously been doing your homework and reading up on various theories. There are a lot of them out there. Unfortunately, most are geared for advanced or high intermediate bodybuilders. You don't need to be concerned with that at this point. Right now, you should be striving to get stronger on the basics. Squatting, Deadlifting, rowing , pressing, throw in a little arm work if you have gas left over in a workout. Things will take time, and they will also take care of themselves. A year or two or three down the road, when you stall out, then start thinking change, periodization, heavy light etc, but for now just lift heavy, and go on a "seefood diet", meaning eat any and everything you can get your hands on. Don't worry too much about getting fat, but do keep an eye on the waistline and bring food consumption down as needed to still gain good lean muscle. Follow Nygmen (Eric's) advice. He talks the talk because he's walked the walk.
Tim

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Post by nygmen » Mon May 31, 2010 6:52 pm

TimD wrote: Follow Nygmen (Eric's) advice. He talks the talk because he's walked the walk.
Tim
Wow, thanks Tim.

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Post by frankie123 » Mon May 31, 2010 10:57 pm

thanks for the replies guys, i m generally just trying to get as cut as possible. n ya mayb i shud change the reps n sets a bit since i havent been doing that much.

thanks

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Post by TimD » Tue Jun 01, 2010 1:33 am

From that reply, I guess you just don't get it , do you. The last thing you need to do right now, judging from your pictures, is to get cut. Get some muscle first. Forget about rep numbers.
Tim

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Post by Ricky » Tue Jun 01, 2010 3:11 pm

"Confusing the muscles" can be a good thing... If you stick to one workout for a long time it can be beneficial to add some variety.

That said, there is no "correct way" to develop a routine. Everyone's body is different and that's why you'll get all kinds of answers asking questions like this.

This should be stating the obvious but as a rule of thumb I say whatever workouts make you the sorest after are probably the ones that work the best for you. If the muscles you are trying to work out are getting sore after the workout you're probably doing something right.

Stick to what works for you and if you find you're not getting sore, *then* you might want to consider changing your routine a bit.

.02

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Post by Jungledoc » Tue Jun 01, 2010 4:56 pm

Soreness is NOT a measure of the effectiveness of a program.

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Post by pdellorto » Tue Jun 01, 2010 4:57 pm

Jungledoc wrote:Soreness is NOT a measure of the effectiveness of a program.
Nope. But going up in weight or reps is. If you go from 5 x 185 to 5 x 190, you're stronger, no matter how sore you are or aren't.

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Post by Ricky » Tue Jun 01, 2010 5:31 pm

Jungledoc wrote:Soreness is NOT a measure of the effectiveness of a program.
From everything I have ever read, soreness is directly correlated with (or at least an indicator of) stress put on the muscle which is pretty much what you're aiming for, right? Of course it's not good if you're overtraining but I seem to get pretty good results this way :roll:

If I'm way off here let me know why.

Going up in weight/reps is a good indicator *over time* but doesn't really help if you're trying to test a new workout. If you do a new workout and you don't get sore it didn't really do anything as far as I'm concerned. It does state in Wikipedia however:
Although DOMS is a symptom associated with muscle damage, its magnitude does not necessarily reflect the magnitude of muscle damage.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delayed_on ... e_soreness

Still, I think you can safely say you should be getting sore from a workout and it is a good indicator if it worked or not.

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Post by stuward » Tue Jun 01, 2010 6:04 pm

You could say it's an indicator of where you lack conditioning. In other words, you're using muscles you might have been neglecting before. You can make progress without pain. You can also have pain without progress. Overall though, you should feel different after your workout.


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