deadlift grip switching to straight bar

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frogbyte
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deadlift grip switching to straight bar

Post by frogbyte » Thu Jun 24, 2010 2:44 pm

We recently got a straight bar which I'm now using for deadlifts etc instead of the easy curl bar. I previously had my hands out on the sides where the easy curl bar was almost straight. However "almost" is the key word here - there is an almost imperceptible tilt up of a few degrees. I never really noticed what an impact it had until switching to a truly straight bar.

Now grip is a major issue due to the huge increase in torque - it felt like someone had a wrench on the bar and was trying to twist it out of my hands. I did 4 working reps last time. I'm certain the rest of me could have done at least 5 this time, but my grip gave out at 3. I'm pondering whether to stick with pronated grip, etc...

Any thoughts?


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Post by Jason Nunn » Thu Jun 24, 2010 2:51 pm

I'm assuming by pronated grip, you mean double overhand? I would recommend learning to use an alternatining grip (one hand pronated, one supinated) or learn to hook grip (thumb under).

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ApolytonGP
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Post by ApolytonGP » Thu Jun 24, 2010 3:05 pm

Deadlift machine? (has a hammer grip)

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Post by frogbyte » Thu Jun 24, 2010 3:13 pm

No, I am not using a deadlift machine, even if I had access to one. If I wanted to cheat I could just go back to the ez curl bar.

Yes, been doing double overhand.

Hmm, I'll go back and read the SS bit about hook grip again.

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Post by frigginwizard » Thu Jun 24, 2010 3:57 pm

theres a deadlift machine?


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Rik-Blades
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Post by Rik-Blades » Thu Jun 24, 2010 3:59 pm

I'd just stick to the pronated grip and keep lifting normaly. I bet you regain your grip strength in a coule of weeks.

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Post by Jungledoc » Thu Jun 24, 2010 3:59 pm

frigginwizard wrote:theres a deadlift machine?
There must be a machine for everything.

You can do neutral-grip DLs with a trap bar, if you can find one.

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Post by Jason Nunn » Thu Jun 24, 2010 4:07 pm

Jungledoc wrote:
frigginwizard wrote:theres a deadlift machine?
There must be a machine for everything.

You can do neutral-grip DLs with a trap bar, if you can find one.
Hammer Strength makes one. It's actually pretty useful if your training for a side handle, car deadlift event. Other than that, I'd stick to trap bars and barbells.

Adding to my first comment, if you really want to work on the hook grip, do it for your first couple sets (as long as you can stand the pain). Then, switch to alternating grip for your working sets. Also, if you take some athletic tape and tear it in half long ways and tape just above and below the thumb joint, it'll help releave some of the pressure and cause a little less pain.

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ApolytonGP
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Post by ApolytonGP » Thu Jun 24, 2010 4:27 pm

straps?

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Jungledoc
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Post by Jungledoc » Thu Jun 24, 2010 4:33 pm

ApolytonGP wrote:straps?
They'll help with the lift, but that will take any grip training out of the equation. I don't want my grip weakness to limit my DL, but since I started using hook grip it hasn't been an issue. I never found hook grip to be painful, just weird feeling at first. Now it seems natural, and I find that I use in unconsciously, even on light lifts. I prefer to use straight double pronated for all but the heaviest lifts, just to try to improve my grip strength.

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Post by Han » Thu Jun 24, 2010 5:25 pm

Frog, even alternating grip will give you a benefit if you don't want to go straight to hook grip.

Also after a period of doing straight leg dead lifts, when I came to back to conventional, my grip was much stronger due to the additional "time under tension" for my grip on the SLDLs. So that could be an option if you want to change it up.

Having said that, I'm now running out of grip on my deads for anything over sets of 3, so I'm either going to have to try hook grip or move to straps (will probably just use straps on the last set).

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Post by Nevage » Thu Jun 24, 2010 8:19 pm

Hook grip? As in the way you hold dumbells in hammer curls? I've always done an alternating hook grip. I used to do an overhand grip years ago but the alternating hook grip made an instant impact on strength gains. I figured out talcum powder works like chalk as well and with the bar glued to my hands I feel a good 10kg being added in the next few months!

Anyway, I'd just stick through it and lower the weight slightly using the straight bar. I think after a few weeks when your external rotators have loosened up in your arms you will notice a big difference. I had a similar problem with my wrist flexibility during squats, I used to put the bar on my upper traps but as the weight got havier and my rear delts got bigger I had to adjust to using them, it's way better but just took a few weeks with flexibility.

Also, my gym at uni has a bar weighing the same as my gym at home. The only difference is its shorter in length and thicker. I find it a lot harder with the long thinner bar in squats and deadlifts so that might be something to thnk about as well, easy curl bars are a lot smaller.

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Post by Jungledoc » Thu Jun 24, 2010 9:43 pm

Hook grip as in wrap your thumb on the bar first, then put the index and middle fingers over the thumb.

Talc shouldn't work like chalk. Opposite. It would lubricate a bit. It would dry your hands a bit though, if that's what the issue is.

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Post by Nevage » Fri Jun 25, 2010 6:26 am

Oh I see, I've never tried the hook grip then, it must feel like you're pulling your thumb off! Yeah it dried my hands out, I just caked them in it. The issue was mainly a slippery bar/sweaty hands so it helped my grip out a lot. Not a bad substitute while I wait for chalk.

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Post by Jungledoc » Fri Jun 25, 2010 8:13 am

I got used to the hook pretty quickly. Now it's almost automatic.


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